Tag: hirokazukoreeda

Toronto 2018 Review: SHOPLIFTERS, Scavenging on Multiple Levels

It’s a common platitude, the choices we make defining us. But what about those we don’t make? The country we live in, the class we’re born into, our family, etc. They may or may not define who we are, but...

New York Asian 2018 Dispatch - Japanese Films: Smut Peddlers, Angsty High Schoolers, Enigmatic Murderers and Edo Sisterhood

The Japanese films in this year’s edition of the New York Asian Film Festival are typically eclectic and mostly accomplished, ranging from fresh takes on period films (Kakekomi, Sekigahara), dark and often disturbing depictions of high school life (River’s Edge,...

Busan 2017 Review: THE THIRD MURDER Ponders the Unknowable in Quiet and Electric Mystery

Known for his controlled and humanistic family dramas, acclaimed filmmaker Hirokazu Koreeda tries his hand at the bread and butter of the Japanese mainstream, the murder mystery. The result, which he directed from his own script, is the ruminative and...

Review: OUR LITTLE SISTER Packs A Most Gentle Punch

For years now, Japanese director Kore-eda Hirokazu has been making films that have an uncommonly humanist core. Often emotional, sometimes openly feel-good even, his films somehow never become the saccharine dross they would undoubtedly be in lesser hands. One of...

Ard's Dozen Of Musings About 2015

While I saw more films in 2015 than I had in 2014, I can almost use the same text here that I wrote for my "dozen of musings" article of last year. For again I have a big backlog of...

Kore-Eda Hirokazu's AFTER THE STORM Details Announced

Kore-Eda Horokazu's next film, After the Storm (Umi yori mo Mada Fukaku), will be released in Japan on May 21, 2016, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Kore-Eda's previous two films (Like Father, Like Son and Our Little Sister) debuted at...

Camera Japan 2015 Review: OUR LITTLE SISTER Shows The Cold Through Blissful Warmth

For years now, Japanese director Kore-eda Hirokazu has been making films which have an uncommonly humanist core. Often emotional, sometimes openly feel-good even, his films somehow never become the saccharine dross they would undoubtedly be in lesser hands. One of...

Vancouver 2013 Dispatch: STRAY DOGS, AIN'T THEM BODIES SAINTS, And LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON

Stray Dogs, the perhaps-last-ever film from Taiwanese master Tsai Ming-liang, is a devastatingly sad, quirk-ily mysterious and slithery film. It's hard to pin down the details of the characters' (a father and his two young children) lives, how much time...

Cannes 2013: First Teaser for LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON

If you're one of the fans anxiously awaiting the first word on the newest picture from Hirokazu Kora-Eda, the man behind such critically acclaimed films as Nobody Knows, Still Walking, and I Wish, you might want to check out the first...

Fantasia 2010: AIR DOLL Review

[A bit of a divisive film, Kore Eda's Air Doll is being shown on the big screen at Fantasia, and here is Niels' very positive take on the film.]When I first heard Koreeda was going to do Air Doll I...

AIR DOLL: Review

When I first heard Koreeda was going to do Air Doll I was extremely pleased to see him return to what he does best: magical realism a la Japonais. Even though most Koreeda fans seemed a little weary of his...

IFFR 2010: AIR DOLL review

Why does an inflatable sex doll come to life and proceed on a journey of discovery looking to explore the human condition? It just does, apparently. Hirokazu Kore-Eda's Air Doll is quietly unapologetic about its status as a winsome...

Vancouver 09: AIR DOLL Review

[Our thanks to Teresa Nieman for the following review.] Hirokazu Koreeda is one of today's most consistently excellent filmmakers, with his recent movies Still Walking and Nobody Knows being critical hits worldwide. Because of this, it seems strange to say...

TIFF 09: AIR DOLL Review

[Our thanks to Moko for the following review.] An uninformed moviegoer may read the initial premise of Air Doll and think, "Wow, a Japanese movie about a sex doll that comes to life? That MUST be zany! There's absolutely no...