Trailer for COCAINE BEAR. Need We Say More?

How about it stars Keri Russell (The Americans), Margo Martindale (The Americans), Ray Liotta in one of his last roles (Goodfellas), Alden Ehrenreich (Solo: A Star Wars Story), O’Shea Jackson Jr. (Straight Outta Compton), Jesse Tyler Ferguson (Modern Family), and Brooklynn...

Review: THE ETERNAL DAUGHTER, Just the Right Level of Creepiness

It might be something bred into us when we're in the womb: a need to please our parents. Or at least, to have some kind of effect on them. The memory of how we either succeeded or failed can haunt...

Review: LEONOR WILL NEVER DIE, Cheerful Tribute to Classic Asian Action Movies

It's a very fine line to walk when your film is metatextual; movies about the making of a movie, particularly the movie that's being made, means understanding the language of cinema deeply enough to make the references without killing the...

THE ARTIFICE GIRL, MAD HEIDI, LOLA and More Win at Trieste Festival

The Trieste Science+Fiction Festival wrapped up this weekend, and awards were given to some worthy winners. Having been on a jury myself at this festival, I can attest to the quality of their selections and the difficult deliberations to choose...

Blu-ray Review: DAISIES, Still Fresh, Subversive, and Relevant, Now Beautifully Restored

While there might be filmmakers who more readily come to the minds of cinephiles when you mention Czech New Wave cinema of the 1960s, I'd argue that there is no more important film of that era than Daisies. Věra Chytilová's...

Review: SOMETHING IN THE DIRT, Inward and Upward, Expanding

Isolation can do funny things to the mind. Even if you like spending time alone, isolation, and the silence that comes with it, is something different. Rather than calm and contentment, it can breed fear, distrust, and obsession. It can...

Review: NOCEBO, Revenge of the Exploited

I've always found the expression 'it's all in your head' to be a bit odd; well, yes, things are in our head, as that's where we process the information that we're given by our senses and our experience in the...

Review: DREAM LIFE, A Field Study in Women's Desire

It's 1970 in Montréal. The Quiet Revolution is finished, having transformed Québec from a conversative region to the verge of being Canada's most culturally significant region. The '69 Expo introduced the world to a city of cultural diversity, with French...

Review: PLEASE BABY PLEASE, A Queer Neon-Noir Musical Seduction

For those in the queer community, and allies of it, we're (hopefully) aware that sexual and gender identity is still that strays outside the heteronormative is still taboo (to put it mildly) in much of the world, even in societies...

Blu-ray Review: LA LLORONA, The Haunting Cries of the Oppressed

There are some historical events, ones whoe political and social impact is so devastating, on large and small scales, that realistic depiction is insufficient. This is, often, where folk tales, mythologies, and legends come from: not always from good things,...

SISU, HUESERA, IRATI, and Quentin Dupieux Win Big at Sitges 2022

The Sitges International Fantastic Film Festival of Catalonia wrapped up this past weekend. The festival was fully back in person, and it was wonderful to experience the energy of this wonderful place once more. And to see so many amazing...

Sitges 2022 Review: STORIES TO KEEP YOU AWAKE Season 2 Delights, Terrifies, Intensifies the Fears

Narciso Ibáñez Serrador's series Historias para no dormir remains one of the most important and influential in Spanish television history; part Twilight Zone, part horror anthology, it has been revived a few times, in the early 2000s with works by...

Sitges 2022 Review: UNIDENTIFIED OBJECTS, Close Encounter of the Queer Kind

The road trip movie is tailor-made for the journey of self discovery; more so perhaps in North America, where the distances are long, the population sparse, and the lack of anything to do besides face yourself dominates. This can be...

Sitges 2022 Review: EMILY, A Soul Driven to Create a Masterpiece

There is a reason why Emily Brontë's novel Wuthering Heights has remained a literary favourite, a mainstay of school books lists, and had several adaptations in film and television: it is very well written, and it is terrifying. One of...

Sitges 2022: PIAFFE, Embracing Animal Behaviour

We too often forget than humans are animals. Too many of us have divorced ourselves from the natural world, the world of our, for lack of a better phrasing, animal instincts. We clothe ouselves, eat (usually) with utensils, as if...

Sitges 2022 Review: IRATI, Basque Epic of Pagan Women & Giants

There isn't a culture on the planet without its myths and folklores (or if there is, I don't want to know about it). These are the stories than can tell a people where they came from, who they were, perhaps...

Sitges 2022 Review: INCREDIBLE BUT TRUE, Hilarious and Ridiculous, Signature Dupieux

French filmmaker Quentin Dupieux might be one of the most prolific filmmakers of our time, and he's also one of the strangest. From sentient, killer tires to jackets that drive people to madness to giant flies, he finds a completely...

Sitges 2022 Review: LEONOR WILL NEVER DIE, A Delightful Homage to 80s Asian Action

It's a very fine line to walk when your film is metatextual; movies about the making of a movie, particularly the movie that's being made, means understanding the language of cinema deeply enough to make the references without killing the...

Sitges 2022 Review: EVIL EYE, Blood & Magic Abound in Modern Mexican Fairy Tale

It's not easy to be the sibling of an ill child. You're expected to be more of an adult than you're prepared for, accept less attention from your parents, be brave and kind, when you yourself are still growing up...

Sitges 2022 Review: THE FIVE DEVILS, The Making of a Witch

Power can be dangerous in the hands of a child. They too often don't quite know what the power is, don't know how to stop it, and don't realize (or sometimes don't care) who they hurt in the process. They...