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Review: I Spent AN EVENING WITH BEVERLY LUFF LINN So You Don't Have To (Unless You Really Want To)

Three words: Not. Greasy. Enough. For those whom such brevity does not suffice (such as the Screen Anarchy editors), I'll elaborate. An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn represents the sophomore effort of The Greasy Strangler helmer Jim Hosking. The relative...

Vancouver 2018 Review: NO. 1 CHUNG YING STREET Champions the Spirit and Courage of Hong Kong

No. 1 Chung Ying Street is the latest from director Derek Chiu, a well-established figure in the Hong Kong film industry. The movie takes place during two periods of political unrest in Sha Tau Kok, a neighborhood that borders mainland...

Vancouver 2018 Review: LUSH REEDS Balances Comedy Expertly with Uneasy Dread

Xiayin (Huang Lu) is a journalist in Nanjing, living with her professor husband and her dog, and expecting her first child. Increasingly frustrated by the restrictions put upon her reporting by her supervisor, she goes against his wishes to investigate...

Blu-ray Review: HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL, a Fun Product of Its Time

The 1999 remake of William Castle’s (1959) House on Haunted Hill by William Malone was a very strange film, and not one I’d seen in a long time, possibly since its video store days. Going back, its quite “Nineties,” down...

Vancouver 2018 Review: THE DARLING, Sadness and Dark Hilarity Abound

The Darling finds a young Korean actress, Lee Sun-hwa (played by Jang Jieun), spending some time abroad in Vancouver, ostensibly to visit her sister and brother-in-law. As she takes in the sights and interacts with the locals, it becomes clear...

Review: THE GUILTY, The Longer He Talks, The Higher the Stakes

If Larry Cohen lived in Copenhagen, he might have written The Guilty. Veteran filmmaker Cohen, of course, has written dozens of screenplays that start with a clever idea and then expound on it with a wicked, pulp sense of humor...

Review: HALLOWEEN, Michael Myers Is Back For Laurie Strode In This High Profile Retcon

Forty years after that immortal Halloween night in 1978, the butcher of Haddonfield returns to finish the job he started in David Gordon Green's Halloween. The co-writer and director reunites the original stars of John Carpenter's iconic slasher cycle starter...

Blu-ray Review: MY MAN GODFREY Gets Spruced up by Criterion

With the Great Depression in full effect, the eloquent and witty Godfrey (William Powell) quickly and hilariously goes from “forgotten man” to “my man.”  The possessor in question is Irene Bullock (Carole Lombard), the youngest and least abrasive woman of...

Review: MID90S, Jonah Hill's Debut As Director Is Funny and Humane

Eleven years after Superbad finally made him stand out as a comedic actor, and seven since Moneyball turned him into an Oscar nominee, Jonah Hill debuts as writer/director with Mid90s, a coming-of-age film that’s funny and, at the same time,...

Sitges 2018 Review: 70 BIG ONES, Crime Thriller That Keeps You Guessing

While Spain is slowly emerging from the economic crisis of the early 2000s, it still hasn't recovered completely, and even the most skilled worker can face themselves with extreme circumstances for which they need money. A lot of it. Now....

Busan 2018 Review: ALPHA, THE RIGHT TO KILL Declaws Duterte's War on Drugs

Arriving hot on the heels of Eric Matti’s similarly plotted but decidedly more entertaining BuyBust, Brillante Mendoza’s Alpha, the Right to Kill is a down and dirty frontline take on Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte’s controversial war on drugs. Seen from...

Review: THUNDER ROAD, Funny, Messy, Cathartic, Downright Heartbreaking

Those fortunate enough to have seen Jim Cummings' Sundance winning short film, Thunder Road (2016), won't soon forget it. Some found it hilarious, some found it awkward, some found it hilariously awkward, perhaps in the vein of human train-wrecks like...

Sitges 2018 Review: KNIFE + HEART, Delightfully Queer, Sensuous and Cruel

An editor looks through reels of a gay porn film, making decisions about what to cut, with the image of a beautiful young man flashing before her. At the same time, this young man is at a club, surrounded by...

Review: BAD TIMES AT THE EL ROYALE, Crime Thriller With A Split Personality

There are at least two sides to every story, and writer/director Drew Goddard uses that conceit to craft a meticulously told tale of crime and punishment in Bad Times at the El Royale. This twisty, turny tale of mischievous double...

Review: LIYANA, Charming and Inspiring Stories That Need to be Told

Liyana documents the inspiring story of a young girl in rural Swaziland, whose parents die from AIDS, and whose little twin brothers are stolen by child traffickers after she and her frail grandmother are assaulted and abused. Liyana must then...

Lund Fantastic 2018 Review: LIVERLEAF, Teenage Drama and Stylized Violence Collide in a Messy Crash

Full disclosure, I am not familiar with the manga Liverleaf (or as it is called in Japan, Misumisô) was based upon. With that, I fear some of my criticisms may be pointed to the source material and not the film....

New York 2018 Review: In THE IMAGE BOOK, Godard Points Us In the Right Direction

With Image Book, there seems to be a concerted effort for Godard to point us in the direction where he sees a corner of the world that is underexposed, underseen and misrepresented by the western world.

Vancouver 2018 Review: EDGE OF THE KNIFE, Immersed in the 19th Century

Edge of the Knife (aka SGaawaay K'uuna) is a film whose reputation will precede it, but for all the right reasons. Its existence marks the first ever feature entirely in Haida, an indigenous language that is spoken fluently by less than...

Review: FIRST MAN, Incredibly Cinematic and Nerve-Wracking

Damien Chazelle has not disappointed. Now onto his third excellent feature in a row, safe-hands Chazelle seems to be on a roll that knows no bounds -- and in many ways, First Man is a perfect, meteoric success. Perhaps Chazelle's...

Sitges 2018 Review: KEEP AN EYE OUT, Another Funny, Crazy And Worthy Film By Quentin Dupieux

The first scene of Keep an Eye Out, another crazy film by France’s Quentin Dupieux, evokes that memorable speech from Rubber about how all the great films have stuff with "no reason" to be. That’s because in said sequence, we...