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Fantasia 2018 Review: ROOM LAUNDERING Is A Cutesy Film About The Dead Teaching Us How To Live

Another solid entry in the quirky-Japanese-comedy genre, Katagiri Kenji's Room Laundering is the sweet tale of a girl who sees dead people. The basic premise is based upon the law stating that landlords must divulge to potential tenants when a...

Fantasia 2018 Review: CAM Is A Frightening Meltdown of Identity and Ego

In the twentieth century, it used to be decades (more often never) for our technological fears, and their refracted social mores, to manifest themselves into some kind of actuality. Now it seems the cycle-time of what we can conceive of,...

Fantasia 2018 Review: THE MAN WHO KILLED HITLER AND THEN THE BIGFOOT Falls Far Short Of Its Potential

Any director with the balls to title their film The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot has got to have a little bit of chutzpah to even attempt to do it justice. Unfortunately, first time feature director Robert...

Fantasia 2018 Review: UNDER THE SILVER LAKE, Underwhelming Story, Overwhelming Cliches

David Robert Mitchell had a critical and audience hit with his second feature film, It Follows, in 2014; so much so that his third feature was readily accepted into the Cannes feature competition this year. Obstensibly a neo-noir thriller about...

Fantasia 2018 Review: MEGA TIME SQUAD, A Whipsmart Rush of Time Travel Tomfoolery

One fine day in his sleepy coastal New Zealand town, after being booted out of living in his mom's garage, petty criminal wannabe (in the local parlance, "Bogan") John, and his dopey pal Gaz, decide to screw over their boss,...

Fantasia 2018 Review: NEOMANILA, A Ripped From The Headlines Neo-Realist Masterpiece

Young street kid Toto is in a very tough spot. His drug dealing brother is in jail, and the local meth pushers think Toto is ratting them out to get the police to secure his release. He spends the few...

Fantasia 2018 Review: COLD SKIN Never Quite Warms Up

A weather scientist, looking to escape his former life with twelve months of dutiful isolation to the Crown on the eve of World War I, is assigned to a small island in the South Atlantic, just inside the Antarctic circle....

Fantasia 2018 Review: PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF DESIRE, A Disturbing Look at China's Ecosystem of Internet Celebrities

There are some frightening dynamics of China’s capital and technology sectors at play in People’s Republic Of Desire, a documentary on the YY Live streaming platform. Relatively unknown in the West (who have their own online addictions issues with Facebook,...

Fantasia 2018 Review: NIGHTMARE CINEMA, Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Grue

The time honoured Anthology film. There are no shortage of them on the festival circuit, particularly in horror-genre circles. Rarely, however, do they come with such pedigree as Nightmare Cinema. It seems Mick Garris has not entirely scratched the itch...

Review: THE UNSEEN, a Gritty-Indie Take on the Invisible Man

In a cluttered single-wide trailer in a snow-covered, anonymously dreary logging town in northern British Columbia, Bob Langmore finds himself disappearing. That it not to say that running away from his wife and daughter almost a decade ago to live...

London Indian 2018 Review: UP, DOWN, & SIDEWAYS, The Song Of Nagaland Fascinates

They're called "li". The traditional working songs of the rice farmers of Nagaland in India's Northeast. A kind of mesmerizing polyphonic conversation among the many men and women who might be out in the paddies at a given time, the...

Review: TIK TIK TIK Tap Tap Taps Into A New Genre For India, Space Masala!

A sixty kilometer wide asteroid is heading straight for the Bay of Bengal off the coast of southwestern India. If the asteroid hits, at least 40 million lives will be lost in the southern states of Tamil Nadu and Andhra...

Review: DAMSEL, Laughs Aplenty in Zellner Brothers' Western

Western tropes get punched straight in their often male-driven faces by a heroine in the Zellner Brothers' newest film.

London Indian 2018 Review: VILLAGE ROCKSTARS Follows A Young Girl's Dream Of Becoming A Musician

Written, directed, and shot by young filmmaker Rima Das, Village Rockstars is a beautiful expression of passion and hope based in a small village in rural Assam in northeast India. The Western perspective of what it means to be a...

London Indian 2018 Review: MEHSAMPUR Is A Challenging, Bracing Hybrid Documentary

On March 8th, 1988, Punjabi folk music icon Amar Singh Chamkila and his partner Amarjot Kaur were shot and killed as they pulled into the Punjabi town of Mehsampur. The crime remains unsolved, and the killers were never caught. In...

Oak Cliff 2018 Review: I AM NOT A WITCH, A Superb Film From A Prodigious New Talent

A young girl, unremarkable in any way, is walking down a path in rural Zambia. Suddenly, a woman walking ahead of her carrying a large bucket or water falls to the ground, losing her load. As the fallen woman looks...

Oak Cliff 2018 Review: VIRUS TROPICAL Explores The Life Of One Young Girl Searching For Her Grand Adventure

From first time feature director Santiago Caicedo, Virus Tropical is a wonderful look at the challenge of growing up through the eyes of a middle class girl from Quito in Ecuador. The film is a black and white animated feature...

Blu-ray Review: Prognosis for THE CURED is Bleak

Released at festivals in 2017 as The Third Wave, David Freyne's first narrative feature (now released as The Cured) nabbed not just Ellen Page (Hard Candy, Juno), who loved the script enough to sign on as both actor and producer,...

London Indian Film Festival 2018 Review: WHAT WILL PEOPLE SAY Takes A Hard Look At A Clash Of Cultures

Director Iram Haq's What Will People Say is a powerful experience that has the potential to ruffle feathers on each side of the argument regarding the responsibilities of immigrants to assimilate into their adopted cultures. An Norwegian-Pakistani woman, here Haq...

Review: HEREDITARY, The Haunted House That We Call Home

Ari Aster's Hereditary is an emotionally devastating family thriller, a terrifying supernatural mystery, and one hell of a complex horror film. This is the kind of film that builds tension for every one of its one-hundred-twenty-seven minutes, and when that...