From The Editors

Albert Pyun, Legend of the Silver Screen, Is Dead

Filmmaker Albert Pyun has died, according to Variety and other sources. He was 69. Our friend Swarez, a past contributor to our site, shared the photo above when Pyun announced his early retirement from filmmaking due to health issues. Swarez...

Sound And Vision: Mary Lambert

In the article series Sound and Vision we take a look at music videos from notable directors. This week we look at Madonna's Like a Prayer, directed by Mary Lambert. Mary Lambert is a great director, one whose career has...

Review: THE MENU Expertly Balances Humor and Horror

Hungry for social satire? The Menu is pretty palatable. It follows other recent films pitting the rich against the poor: Ready or Not (2019), The Platform (2019), and Triangle of Sadness (2022) are three examples that do it well. If...

Review: WHITE NOISE, Calculated Comedic Chaos and Commentary

Adam Driver and Greta Gerwig tune in for Noah Baumbach's existential ride.

Friday One Sheet: WHITE NOISE

Like a cross between Mort Drucker's dense caricature work for Mad Magazine, the Where's Waldo? children's books, and the board game Scotland Yard, illustrator Marija Tiurina's key art for White Noise is a helluva thing. Tiurina has done several of...

Review: LEONOR WILL NEVER DIE, Cheerful Tribute to Classic Asian Action Movies

It's a very fine line to walk when your film is metatextual; movies about the making of a movie, particularly the movie that's being made, means understanding the language of cinema deeply enough to make the references without killing the...

Review: NANNY, Enthralling, Unsettling Immigrant Horror

Nanny, writer-director Nikyatu Jusu's impressively-imagined, impressively crafted feature-length debut, brilliantly explores one aspect of the the 21st-century immigrant experience that's too often left either unexamined or under-examined on film, TV, and cable. Wrapped inside cleverly executed supernatural/horror genre tropes with...

Review: WEDNESDAY, A Showcase for Jenny Ortega's Considerable Talents

Since New Jersey-born cartoonist Charles Addams’s eponymously named family made the jump from comics to television in 1964 (the brilliantly morbid, short-lived series lives on via syndicated perpetuity), the Addams Family has returned periodically in animated and non-animated form since,...

Review: ECHO 3, They Grabbed My Wife and His Sister. We're Coming For You.

Michael Huisman, Luke Evans and Jessica Ann Collins star in the series, created by Mark Boal and debuting globally on Apple TV+, that aims to explore deeper issues than the action that predominates.

Cork 2022 Review: ARVÉD, Occultist Biopic as Transcending Ritual

Czech director Vojtech Mašek's feature debut folds a psychological and political thriller into a mystery drama, enwrapped in a biopic about the infamous Czech occultist drawn to the dark side.

Review: BONES AND ALL, Young Cannibals in Love

Timothée Chalamet reunites with his Call Me By Your Name director Luca Guadagnino for another unconventional romance, the cannibal road movie Bones And All, adapted from Camille DeAngelis’ award-winning 2016 novel of the same name.   Chalamet is just one...

Review: THE FABELMANS, Dreams Can Also Be Fun

Dreams are scary. In The Fabelmans, Steven Spielberg puts his own childhood up on the big screen, through the Dream Factory, with the help of many of his regular collaborators, including screenwriter Tony Kushner (Munich, Lincoln), John Williams (Jaws, Indiana...

Review: STRANGE WORLD, Top-Notch World-Building, A-Level Animation

For Strange World, its 61st feature-length animated film in its 85-year-old history, Disney Animation Studios tapped veteran animator Don Hall (Raya and the Last Dragon, Moana, Big Hero 6) and playwright-turned-screenwriter Qui Nguyen (Raya and the Last Dragon), the former to...

SOMETHING IN THE DIRT Q&A Video: 40 Minutes With Mike Flanagan, Justin Benson, Aaron Moorhead

The latest film by Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead prompted our own Shelagh Rowan-Legg to conclude her review thusly: "Delving once again into the metaphysical and its shadowy yet pervasive hold, Something in the Dirt takes a labyrinthian walk through...

Los Cabos 2022 Review: THE BEASTS, A Potent and Complex Exploration of Mundane Violence

The Spanish-French production The Beasts (As bestas), directed by Rodrigo Sorogoyen, takes place in a Galician village, although its central characters are a couple of French farmers, who have been living there for a couple of years, Olga and Antoine,...

Review: GLASS ONION - A KNIVES OUT MYSTERY, Daniel Craig's Super-Sleuth Takes on the One Percent (Again)

Over the last several weeks, the cult of personality centered on onetime tech “genius” (and billionaire) Elon Musk suffered a major setback, a self-inflicted wound that threatened to take down one of the largest, most popular social media platforms. Beware,...

Sound And Vision: Rian Johnson

In the article series Sound and Vision we take a look at music videos from notable directors. This week we look at The Mountain Goats' Woke Up New, directed by Rian Johnson. In honor of Rian Johnson's new film Glass...

Imagine 2022 Review: SPUTUM Gobs At Class Differences

It isn't often that we see a science fiction film made in the Netherlands, especially an English-language one, but lo-and-behold: at this year's Imagine Film Festival there was a world première for just such a film: director Dan Geesin's dystopic...

Friday One Sheet: INSIDE

I love a good teaser poster, and these three pieces of key art for Vasilis Katsoupis' debut feature deliver a satisfying tease. The film, Inside, is a one man, one room heist film starring Willem Dafoe, who slowly goes crazy after...

South African Horrorfest 2022: THE HARBINGER, KING OF SCREEN And LIFE WITH CHUCKY Highlight African Genre Fest Lineup

After an unforeseen scheduling setback our friends at the South African Horrorfest picked up their bootstraps and were able to reschedule their annual event for this coming week and a half. While its always nice to be able to hold...