Review: THE IRISHMAN Feels the Heavy Weight of Mortality

Martin Scorsese's epic gangster saga, starring Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, Al Pacino, Ray Romano, Harvey Keitel, and Anna Paquin, falls short of his masterpieces 'Goodfellas' and 'Casino,' but is still well-made and magnificently acted.

New York 2019 Review: YOUNG AHMED, Portrait of the Religious Extremist As a Young Man

The latest social-realist drama from Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, starring Idir Ben Addi, Othmane Moumen, and Myriem Akheddiou, is well-intentioned, but unfortunately has little to say about Islamist radicalization.

New York 2019 Review: THE IRISHMAN, Martin Scorsese's Epic Return to the Gangster Movie Genre

Martin Scorsese's epic gangster saga, starring Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, Al Pacino, Ray Romano, Harvey Keitel, and Anna Paquin, falls short of his masterpieces 'Goodfellas' and Casino,' but is still well-made and magnificently acted.

Review: HUSTLERS, A Breezy, Stylish Tale of Robin Hoods of the Strip Club

Written and directed by Lorene Scafaria, and starring Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez, Keke Palmer, Lili Reinhart, and Julia Stiles (with cameos by Cardi B and Lizzo), this stylish true-crime caper boasts great performances and a potent feminist slant.

Asian American International 2019 Review: GO BACK TO CHINA, An Endearing, Brightly Colored Comedy-Drama About Family And Cultural Clashes

Writer-director Emily Ting's second feature, starring Anna Akana, Lynn Chen, Richard Ng, Kelly Hu, and Kendy Cheung, slyly subverts the racial epithet of its title to deliver a winning comedy-drama of cultural differences and complicated family dynamics.

Asian American International 2019 Review: YELLOW ROSE, Immigration Woes and Country Music Dreams

Diane Paragas' debut feature, with a revelatory central performance by Broadway star Eva Noblezada, offers a unique, finely crafted, and timely take on the issues of immigration and undocumented people.

New York Asian 2019 Preview: 10 Films to See

Film at Lincoln Center and the New York Asian Film Foundation present the 18th edition of the New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF), which runs from Friday, June 28 through July 14, 2019. This year's program features another extensive survey...

BAMcinemaFest 2019 Dispatch: Three Intimate Visions

The 11th edition of BAMcinemaFest, which conluded over the weekend, showcased as always some of the most innovative and provocative work being done in current American independent cinema. This year's festival put a particular emphasis on highlighting communities and experiences...

Tribeca 2019 Preview: Across the Competitions

NYC's big indie festival the Tribeca Film Fest kicks off tomorrow. It's another solid lineup of features (plus TV, plus VR, plus talks) and we've been poring over the catalog looking for the special gems. The festival runs three competitions:...

CineCina 2019 Fest Dispatch: A New Fest Brings Chinese-language Indies to NYC

The inaugural CineCina Film Festival, screening at SVA Theatre and Peter Norton Symphony Space through April 19, brings an impressive slate on recent Chinese-language independent films, both narrative and documentary, from China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Also included is a...

New Directors/New Films 2019: 5 Notable Selections

This year's edition of New Directors/New Films, boasting one of its strongest slates in recent memory, runs through April 7 at The Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Museum of Modern Art. Below are five notable selections. For more...

New York Asian Winter Showcase 2019 Review: MISS BAEK, A Tough, Unflinching Depiction of Child Abuse and Its Aftermath

Lee Ji-won's beautifully crafted debut feature is tough and uncompromising, but also a vibrant showcase for her impressive filmmaking and the equally impressive performances by main actresses Han Ji-min and Kim Si-ah.

Review: TOUCH ME NOT, A Bold, Challenging Look at Intimacy and Sexuality

“All emotions are welcome here.” So says male escort/therapist Seani Love during a session with Laura (Laura Benson) in Romanian filmmaker Adina Pintilie's startling and provocative film Touch Me Not, which follows Laura and several other characters as they explore their relations to their own bodies and to other people, explorations that often involve...

Screen Anarchy's Favorite Films of 2018

Here's our favorite films of 2018, as voted on by more than 20 of our contributing writers, who collectively picked 114 films as their favorites. 1. Roma 2. The Favourite 3 (tie). BlacKkKlansman / You Were Never Really Here 5....

Review: THE PUBLIC IMAGE IS ROTTEN, Incisive, Honest and Funny

Tabbert Fiiller's documentary on John Lydon's band Public Image Ltd. is the definitive portrait of this inventive, influential post-punk outfit.

Review: KUSAMA - INFINITY, The Life and Art of Yayoi Kusama

Now at the age of 88, legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is currently one of the most popular and successful artists in the world. Her recent New York gallery exhibition, "Yayoi Kusama: Festival of Life" - featuring her signature "Infinity...

Review: HAL, Tribute to a Lasting Cinematic Legacy

The so-called “New Hollywood” of the 1970s was driven by a number of filmmakers, many of them film school trained, who broke with many established modes of production and benefited from the opportunities afforded them by the collapse of the...

Review: The Incendiary, Impassioned BLACKKKLANSMAN Is Classic Spike Lee

The premise of BlacKkKlansman, Spike Lee’s impassioned, incendiary, often brilliant new film, sounds like a joke. In 1978, Ron Stallworth (John David Washington, son of Denzel), a black rookie detective in the Colorado Springs police department, infiltrates the local chapter...

Japan Cuts 2018 Sneak Peek: New Work from Naomi Kawase Leads an Eclectic Slate

Summer in New York City means Japan Society presenting another round of delish contemporary Japanese films, ranging from the weird and macabre, to the sincere and bubblegum apeshit insane! It's all happening, starting today, July 19, and roaring until July...

New York Asian 2018 Dispatch - Japanese Films: Smut Peddlers, Angsty High Schoolers, Enigmatic Murderers and Edo Sisterhood

The Japanese films in this year’s edition of the New York Asian Film Festival are typically eclectic and mostly accomplished, ranging from fresh takes on period films (Kakekomi, Sekigahara), dark and often disturbing depictions of high school life (River’s Edge,...