Tribeca 2019 Preview: Across the Competitions

NYC's big indie festival the Tribeca Film Fest kicks off tomorrow. It's another solid lineup of features (plus TV, plus VR, plus talks) and we've been poring over the catalog looking for the special gems. The festival runs three competitions:...

CineCina 2019 Fest Dispatch: A New Fest Brings Chinese-language Indies to NYC

The inaugural CineCina Film Festival, screening at SVA Theatre and Peter Norton Symphony Space through April 19, brings an impressive slate on recent Chinese-language independent films, both narrative and documentary, from China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Also included is a...

New Directors/New Films 2019: 5 Notable Selections

This year's edition of New Directors/New Films, boasting one of its strongest slates in recent memory, runs through April 7 at The Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Museum of Modern Art. Below are five notable selections. For more...

New York Asian Winter Showcase 2019 Review: MISS BAEK, A Tough, Unflinching Depiction of Child Abuse and Its Aftermath

Lee Ji-won's beautifully crafted debut feature is tough and uncompromising, but also a vibrant showcase for her impressive filmmaking and the equally impressive performances by main actresses Han Ji-min and Kim Si-ah.

Review: TOUCH ME NOT, A Bold, Challenging Look at Intimacy and Sexuality

“All emotions are welcome here.” So says male escort/therapist Seani Love during a session with Laura (Laura Benson) in Romanian filmmaker Adina Pintilie's startling and provocative film Touch Me Not, which follows Laura and several other characters as they explore their relations to their own bodies and to other people, explorations that often involve...

Screen Anarchy's Favorite Films of 2018

Here's our favorite films of 2018, as voted on by more than 20 of our contributing writers, who collectively picked 114 films as their favorites. 1. Roma 2. The Favourite 3 (tie). BlacKkKlansman / You Were Never Really Here 5....

Review: THE PUBLIC IMAGE IS ROTTEN, Incisive, Honest and Funny

Tabbert Fiiller's documentary on John Lydon's band Public Image Ltd. is the definitive portrait of this inventive, influential post-punk outfit.

Review: KUSAMA - INFINITY, The Life and Art of Yayoi Kusama

Now at the age of 88, legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is currently one of the most popular and successful artists in the world. Her recent New York gallery exhibition, "Yayoi Kusama: Festival of Life" - featuring her signature "Infinity...

Review: HAL, Tribute to a Lasting Cinematic Legacy

The so-called “New Hollywood” of the 1970s was driven by a number of filmmakers, many of them film school trained, who broke with many established modes of production and benefited from the opportunities afforded them by the collapse of the...

Review: The Incendiary, Impassioned BLACKKKLANSMAN Is Classic Spike Lee

The premise of BlacKkKlansman, Spike Lee’s impassioned, incendiary, often brilliant new film, sounds like a joke. In 1978, Ron Stallworth (John David Washington, son of Denzel), a black rookie detective in the Colorado Springs police department, infiltrates the local chapter...

Japan Cuts 2018 Sneak Peek: New Work from Naomi Kawase Leads an Eclectic Slate

Summer in New York City means Japan Society presenting another round of delish contemporary Japanese films, ranging from the weird and macabre, to the sincere and bubblegum apeshit insane! It's all happening, starting today, July 19, and roaring until July...

New York Asian 2018 Dispatch - Japanese Films: Smut Peddlers, Angsty High Schoolers, Enigmatic Murderers and Edo Sisterhood

The Japanese films in this year’s edition of the New York Asian Film Festival are typically eclectic and mostly accomplished, ranging from fresh takes on period films (Kakekomi, Sekigahara), dark and often disturbing depictions of high school life (River’s Edge,...

ScreenAnarchy's Top Movies Of The First Half Of 2018

Time flies like a sonofabitch, and this year it seems to do so faster than usual. We are at 2018's mid-point already. Whoa! That does beg the question though: what films have managed to impress and touch us most, so...

New York Asian Film Festival 2018 Sneak Peek: Weird, Wild Summertime Cinema

With the summer heat on full blast this coming weekend in New York, patrons of the five burroughs may want to consider the cool and also very hip insides of a movie theater for proper retreat and enjoyment. And what...

BAMcinemaFest 2018 Dispatch: Spotlighted Selections

The tenth edition of BAMcinemaFest, screening at the Brooklyn Academy of Music's BAM Rose Cinemas and the BAM Harvey Theater through July 1, continues its tradition of showcasing bold, idiosyncratic, and accomplished cinematic visions in American independent cinema, along with...

Tribeca 2018 Preview: Ten Notable Fest Selections

The 17th edition of the Tribeca Film Festival, running through April 29, is once again packed with films, talks, and moving image work beyond film such as VR, television, online work, and gaming events. The opening film is Lisa D'Apolito's Love,...

Preview: Documentary, Iranian Style: The Films of Mehrdad Oskouei

When one mentions Iranian cinema, the names that most often come to mind are such directors as the late Abbas Kiarostami, Jafar Panahi, and Asghar Farhadi. More knowlegedable aficionados may also be able to mention such filmmakers as Mohsen Makhmalbaf,...

Sundance 2018 Review: HAL, A Great Director of the 1970s Gets His Due

The so-called “New Hollywood” of the 1970s was driven by a number of filmmakers, many of them film school trained, who broke with many established modes of production and benefited from the opportunities afforded them by the collapse of the...

Sundance 2018 Review: KUSAMA - INFINITY, Inside the Life, Work, and Mind of a Legendary Artist

Now at the age of 88, legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is currently one of the most popular and successful artists in the world. Her recent New York gallery exhibition, "Yayoi Kusama: Festival of Life" - featuring her signature "Infinity...

Slamdance 2018 Review: MAN ON FIRE, One Man's Ultimate Sacrifice and a Town's Reckoning With Its Racism

On June 23, 2014, a 79-year-old Methodist minister named Charles Moore drove to a nearly deserted shopping center parking lot in his former hometown of Grand Saline, Texas, poured gasoline on himself, and set himself on fire. The note Moore...