New York Asian 2018 Dispatch - Japanese Films: Smut Peddlers, Angsty High Schoolers, Enigmatic Murderers and Edo Sisterhood

The Japanese films in this year’s edition of the New York Asian Film Festival are typically eclectic and mostly accomplished, ranging from fresh takes on period films (Kakekomi, Sekigahara), dark and often disturbing depictions of high school life (River’s Edge,...

ScreenAnarchy's Top Movies Of The First Half Of 2018

Time flies like a sonofabitch, and this year it seems to do so faster than usual. We are at 2018's mid-point already. Whoa! That does beg the question though: what films have managed to impress and touch us most, so...

New York Asian Film Festival 2018 Sneak Peek: Weird, Wild Summertime Cinema

With the summer heat on full blast this coming weekend in New York, patrons of the five burroughs may want to consider the cool and also very hip insides of a movie theater for proper retreat and enjoyment. And what...

BAMcinemaFest 2018 Dispatch: Spotlighted Selections

The tenth edition of BAMcinemaFest, screening at the Brooklyn Academy of Music's BAM Rose Cinemas and the BAM Harvey Theater through July 1, continues its tradition of showcasing bold, idiosyncratic, and accomplished cinematic visions in American independent cinema, along with...

Tribeca 2018 Preview: Ten Notable Fest Selections

The 17th edition of the Tribeca Film Festival, running through April 29, is once again packed with films, talks, and moving image work beyond film such as VR, television, online work, and gaming events. The opening film is Lisa D'Apolito's Love,...

Preview: Documentary, Iranian Style: The Films of Mehrdad Oskouei

When one mentions Iranian cinema, the names that most often come to mind are such directors as the late Abbas Kiarostami, Jafar Panahi, and Asghar Farhadi. More knowlegedable aficionados may also be able to mention such filmmakers as Mohsen Makhmalbaf,...

Sundance 2018 Review: HAL, A Great Director of the 1970s Gets His Due

The so-called “New Hollywood” of the 1970s was driven by a number of filmmakers, many of them film school trained, who broke with many established modes of production and benefited from the opportunities afforded them by the collapse of the...

Sundance 2018 Review: KUSAMA - INFINITY, Inside the Life, Work, and Mind of a Legendary Artist

Now at the age of 88, legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is currently one of the most popular and successful artists in the world. Her recent New York gallery exhibition, "Yayoi Kusama: Festival of Life" - featuring her signature "Infinity...

Slamdance 2018 Review: MAN ON FIRE, One Man's Ultimate Sacrifice and a Town's Reckoning With Its Racism

On June 23, 2014, a 79-year-old Methodist minister named Charles Moore drove to a nearly deserted shopping center parking lot in his former hometown of Grand Saline, Texas, poured gasoline on himself, and set himself on fire. The note Moore...

Slamdance 2018 Review: HUMAN AFFAIRS, An Intimate Drama With Panoramic, Cosmic Scope

Human Affairs is nominally about the effect of an impending surrogate birth on the childless couple involved, but its title points to its far more panoramic scope. Bracketed by decades-spanning sequences of still photographs, Human Affairs visually and thematically places its three principal characters within...

Review: LOVER FOR A DAY, An Exquisitely Shot Vision of Love and (In)Fidelity

Philippe Garrel – a stalwart filmmaker who admirably continues to keep the spirit of the French New Wave alive – with his latest, Lover for a Day, completes a trilogy also comprising his previous works Jealousy and In the Shadow of Women. Like the other two films, Lover for a Day is...

ScreenAnarchy's Favourite Films of 2017

Another year over, and what an annus horribilis it proved to be in so many ways. But away from the political atrocities that took place in pretty much every country you care to mention, and the sexual harassment scandals that...

DOC NYC 2017: Six Must-See Selections

DOC NYC, the largest documentary featival in the US, returns for its 8th edition, running from November 9-16, and screening at IFC Center, SVA Theatre, and Cinepolis Chelsea. This year's slate includes well over 100 features, and includes new works...

Preview: Margaret Mead 2017 "Activates" Cross-Cultural Connection

The Margaret Mead Film Festival, the premier showcase for documentary films in New York, returns for its 41st edition, screening at the American Museum of Natural History from Oct. 19-22. This year's typically impressive slate consists of 29 feature films and 12...

Japan Cuts 2017 Preview: A Country at a Crossroads and the Movies at the Heart of it All

Japan Cuts: The Festival of New Japanese Film comes roaring back to life for another season of fresh flicks with the ninja-samurai action epic MUMON: The Land of Stealth kicking things off July 13 at the Japan Society in New...

Preview: The New York Asian Film Festival Celebrates Sixteen Sweet Years

Lucky New Yorkers, it's that time again when the good folks at Subway Cinema bring us the New York Asian Film Festival, a superior alternative to bombastic multiplex fare, and a one-stop shop for the latest and greatest of the...

Review: FOLK HERO & FUNNY GUY, Great Performances Mark the Arrival of a Remarkable Filmmaking Talent

One of the key ingredients for a successful film is a good title. And one thing that makes for a good title is one that is perfectly descriptive of the movie within.   Jeff Grace's witty, diverting feature debut Folk...

Tribeca 2017 Review: THE LOVERS, Break Up To Make Up, That's All They Do

Azazel Jacobs is a young filmmaker who’s continuing a family tradition. His father is avant-garde cinema legend Ken Jacobs, and his mother Flo and sister Nisi are also participants, all of them having worked on each other’s films. (Ken and Flo played the protagonist’s parents in Azazel’s 2008...

Tribeca 2017 Review: THE CIRCLE, Where All Are Trapped in the Social Media Web

The subject of our hyper-connected, social media-based cultural landscape is a fruitful and relevant one for filmmakers, and one with great potential for mass audience interest, given how pervasive this is in our daily lives. David Fincher’s Facebook origin story The Social Network can be looked upon as the gold...

Tribeca 2017 Review: THE PUBLIC IMAGE IS ROTTEN, A Legendary Musician's Musical and Personal Reinvention

“Ever get the feeling you’ve been cheated?” John Lydon aka Johnny Rotten’s acerbic question to the audience at the end of the Sex Pistols’ disastrous 1978 U.S. tour may have marked the end of that group, but for Lydon himself,...