Review: In REDOUBT, Artist Matthew Barney Continues His Modern Day Myth-Making

Undoubtedly a continuation of Matthew Barney's unique, modern-day myth-making process, the hypnotic images in 'Redoubt' have to be experienced on the big screen.

SYNONYMS Interview: Nadav Lapid on Israeli Identity, Art of Persuasion, and Actor Tom Mercier

Synonyms, Nadav Lapid's semi-autobiographical film about a young Israeli man struggling with his country's identity, won him many accolades this year, including the Golden Bear at the Berlinale. The film is greatly aided by its fearless star Tom Mercier. I...

New York 2019 Review: VITALINA VARELA, A Hauntingly Beautiful Immigrant Song

As usual, the film is stunning to look at. Every frame is a work of art. Greatly aided by Leonardo Simões' cinematography and João Gazua and Hugo Leitão's sound work, the film gives the lives of its inhabitants the poeticism they deserve.

New York 2019 Review: Grief and Human Folly in Angela Schanelec's I WAS AT HOME, BUT...

A puzzle piece that is never solvable, we instead concentrate on gestures and details inside the frame, in compensation for the lack of dialogue. It's that fragmentary images and colors that we play around our heads long after we leave the theater to make sense of it. Even more so than Godard's, Schanelec's cinema concentrates on the 'visual' part of the medium. It is the best kind of cinema I can think of.

New York 2019 Review: ATLANTICS, A Ghost Story with Female Solidarity Twist

Expertly weaving the current headlines of marine disasters and the ghost story with the female solidarity twist, 'Atlantics' has all the right ingredient to be a success story of a small art film breakthrough, recalling 'Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives.'

New York 2019 Review: Justified Mayhem in Kleber Mendonça Filho's BACURAU

At a glance, without any context of what's happening in Brazil, as the Bacurauans get rid of foreigners and traitors, the film is a silly, tacky man-hunting-man horror movie akin to The Most Dangerous Game or Naked Prey or even Hostel or Ruins. But it isn't. Bacurau highlights the resilience and resolve of Brazilian people against mounting assault of multi-national corporations backed by government military to devastate their beautiful, once burgeoning country in the global crisis era we live in. It's an activist film in a B-Horror movie disguise.

New York 2019: Bertrand Bonello's ZOMBI CHILD Is a Warning to White Folks: Don't Mess with Voodoo

'Zombi Child' digs deeper into hasty western appropriation of everything non-European, non-Anglo American culture. It disregards the cultural, historical, ethnographical significance of the origins of a zombie in exchange for sensationalism. Narcisse's journey back home is more interesting story here.

New York 2019 Review: OH MERCY!, Arnaud Desplechin's LAW AND ORDER

Certainly different from any other Desplechin film I have watched over the years, but no less intriguing. The love he has for his hometown and its inhabitants are undoubtedly palpable. Desplechin is a master storyteller and humanist. The film is a very moving experience.

New York 2019 Review: THE WILD GOOSE LAKE, Rain Soaked Tropical Noir

Yet it is not as taut as 'Black Coal Thin Ice.' It sets up the motion nicely, but it doesn't have a momentum to follow through its 113-minute running time. Watch it for its beauty. Watch it for atmosphere. The film is still well worth the ticket.

New York 2019 Review: Identity Crisis in Nadav Lapid's SYNONYMS

The film works, thanks largely to Tom mercier's physical as well as verbal, at times verging on slapstick level on both counts. The film is often hilarious and at times poignant and filled with manic energy. Shai Goldman's handheld camera work is aces also.

New York 2019 Review: Night of Sexual Indulgence in Albert Serra's LIBERTÉ

Like most of Serra's work, there is a hint of parody in these shenanigans. I mean, it's actors in wigs stroking themselves in the woods in a movie called 'freedom'. I think with Liberté, Serra reached the new height in his formalist approach to costume dramas.

Japan Cuts 2019 Preview: Dance the Summer Away With Great New Films

"New York, New York, a helluva town!" So declare the lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, set to music by Leonard Bernstein, in On the Town (1944), and it applies equally well today to the city that will host...

ScreenAnarchy's Top Movies Of The First Half Of 2019

With 2020 only half a year away, let's do the mid-2019 Top-Ten thing. We asked our staff of writers and editors what, in their opinion, were the best films this year so far. And because that's too easy, as writer...

New York Asian 2019 Preview: 10 Films to See

Film at Lincoln Center and the New York Asian Film Foundation present the 18th edition of the New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF), which runs from Friday, June 28 through July 14, 2019. This year's program features another extensive survey...

Preview: Open Roads: New Italian Cinema 2019

Film at Lincoln Center and Istituto Luce Cinecittà present the 19th edition of Open Roads: New Italian Cinema, which will unfold from June 6-12. These new crop of films reflects diverse issues facing the country, embroiled in social and political...

Maryland Film Fest Review: QUEEN OF LAPA, Clear-eyed, Intimate Look at Rio's Trans Sex Worker Community

The documentary doesn't highlight the differences of its subjects from the audience, but rather acknowledges and celebrates what we have in common: our humanity.

Preview: Panorama Europe 2019 at MoMI

Museum of Moving Image (MoMI) hosts the 11th edition of Panorama Europe, showcasing the current crop of the best European films, including both narrative and documentary works. The series presents a portrait of contemporary Europe during a period of tremendous...

Review: GRASS, Cynical, Delicious Coffee Shop Vignettes

Kim Minhee stars in director Hong Sangsoo's latest human comedy.

Art of the Real: A Celebration of Non-Narrative Filmmaking

As an adventurous spectator of cinema who writes about films and is very much interested in where cinema is headed as an art form, I can say that Art of the Real, a film series that showcases innovative, daring, non-narrative...

Interview: Bi Gan Talks LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT

There are many talented young filmmakers out there but no one impressed me with their first couple of highly ambitious and accomplished films like a 30-year old Chinese filmmaker Bi Gan did. The sheer technical prowess and visual and literal...