Review: SUNSET, László Nemes' Cerebral, Dazzling Study of Chaotic Times

László Nemes doesn't give an easy answer to any of the intrigues in his film. Instead, he makes us work for it. And it's damn well worth it.

SUNSET Interview: László Nemes on His Challenging, Mesmerizing New Film

I saw Hungarian director/writer László Nemes' sophomore film Sunset at this year's Film Comment Selects series and was blown away by it. It is just as strong as his phenomenal debut film Son of Saul, a riveting Holocaust drama that...

Review: ASH IS PUREST WHITE, Epic, Unsentimental Melodrama

A deep and poignant masterpiece from seasoned filmmaker Jia Zhangke.

ASH IS PUREST WHITE Interview: Jia Zhangke on Gangster Genre and His Film

With his sprawling gangster epic melodrama Ash Is Purest White opening this Friday in New York, Jia Zhangke, the master chronicler of changing China, was in town and I was lucky enough to snag an interview. Spanning 17 years, Ash...

Interview: Mia Hansen-Løve on Her Daring New Film MAYA

Mia Hansen-Løve is one of my very favorite directors working today. Her infinitely wise films about the passage of time, the beautiful characterizations of the people who inhabit her work, as well as her willingness to always expand her cinematic...

AMANDA Interview: Mikhaël Hers on Grief, Music and Summer

With his thoughtful presentation of loss, grief and human connection and youthful melancholy in medium length films (just around the 1-hour mark) Montparnasse and Primrose Hill, I was hooked on Mikhaël Hers’ gentle artistry. With the two features that followed,...

Preview: Rendez-Vous with French Cinema at FSLC

The Film Society of Lincoln Center and Uni France again team up for the 24th edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema at Lincoln Center, this year from February 28 through March 10. The series puts an empasis on showcasing new...

Preview: Film Comment Selects 2019

In its 19th edition, Film Comment Selects provides a showcase for various films from around the world, their contribution to cinema deemed important and vital by Film Comment Magazine's esteemed editors. This year's lineup includes Steven Soderbergh's High Flying Bird,...

Review: Nuri Bilge Ceylan's THE WILD PEAR TREE Sings Superb Post-College Blues

As always with Celyan's films, watching his latest feels like reading a good, dense book, filled with rich characters and delicious philosophical musings.

Review: Jean-Luc Godard's THE IMAGE BOOK Remains Urgent

The master's latest essay film is a hard nut to crack, but it's worth the effort.

Screen Anarchy's Favorite Films of 2018

Here's our favorite films of 2018, as voted on by more than 20 of our contributing writers, who collectively picked 114 films as their favorites. 1. Roma 2. The Favourite 3 (tie). BlacKkKlansman / You Were Never Really Here 5....

Review: COLD WAR, Tragic Love Story, Told at a Breezy Pace

As Pawel Pawlikowski's acclaimed drama opens in theaters, we revisit our review from the New York Film Festival.

New York 2018 Review: In THE IMAGE BOOK, Godard Points Us In the Right Direction

With Image Book, there seems to be a concerted effort for Godard to point us in the direction where he sees a corner of the world that is underexposed, underseen and misrepresented by the western world.

New York 2018 Review: COLD WAR, Tragic, Fatalistic Love Story, Briskly Told

Shot again in full frame monochrome by Lukascz Zal, the film is every bit as beautiful as Ida. His use of head space is there and it's lovely. Kulesza has a clear and beautiful singing voice in every style, providing some of the loveliest vocal tracks for the film's great, jazzy soundtrack.

New York 2018 Review: Emotions Run High in Hong Sangsoo's GRASS

When considering the work of Hong Sangsoo, Grass is not groundbreaking or anything, but itis perhaps more cynical and darker than Hong's other films. Still, the director's human comedy continues with slight variations each time with delicious results.

New York 2018 Review: HAPPY AS LAZZARO, An Allegorical Tale of Haves and Have Nots

Lazzaro is someone who is desperately needed in this cynical, cruel world. Alice Rohrbacher's writing shines in bringing out humor and humanity in an whimsical yet pointy allegory full of wonders.

New York 2018 Review: Bi Gan's LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT, The Cinematic Event of the Year

The darkness in Long Day's Journey into Night is comforting, seductive and beautiful, never ominous or threatening. You are taken for an intoxicating ride and you don't want to wake up from this dream. You don't want to get out of the spell Bi Gan put on us. Long Day's Journey into Night is an unforgettable moviegoing experience and the most audacious film in years. Please see it in a theater, if you can.

New York 2018 Review: ASH IS PUREST WHITE, Epic Melodrama at its Finest

Ash is the Purest White is a full-on (un)sentimental melodrama in epic scale. It's perhaps Jia's most down to earth, character study work. The long stretch in the middle gains more poignancy as the film goes along and afterwords. Some people reinvent themselves along with the changing times and some people don't. Some things in them though, remain the same. Jia expertly juxtaposes these conundrums, reflecting the soul of a changing nation.

Review: MEMOIR OF WAR, a Harrowing Tale of Absence and Shame

Skillfully directed and beautifully acted, Memoir of War retains much of Duras' enigmatic, complex human tendencies during war time. Like her other works, it draws from her experiences and amplifies/embelishes many of her major themes - desires, suffering, shame, survivor's guilt, memories....

Interview: Emmanuel Finkiel on Adapting Marguerite Duras' Semi-Autobiographical Work in MEMOIR OF WAR

It's a big challenge to adapt a book by one of the literary giants, Margeurite Duras. Known for her enigmatic, erotically charged, fiercely political writings and films, Duras was one of the key figures in the most significant French literary...