Interview: Rebecca Zlotowski Talks AN EASY GIRL

Before everything went to hell with the COVID-19, I was prepping for attending Film at Lincoln Center's annual Rendezvous with French Cinema Festival, as I've been covering it for Screen Anarchy for the last several years. I was even lucky...

Interview: BACURAU Directors Kleber Mendonça Filho and Juliano Dornelles

Flipping the idea of first world hegemony on its head, a Brazilian Western sci-fi genre mashup Bacurau is a campy, violent, funny, angry, energetic and carthartic film that is extremely enjoyable for both genre fans and politically minded. It is...

Review: THE WILD GOOSE LAKE, Stylish Noir and Controlled Chaos

The followup to Black Coal, Thin Ice, Diao Yinan's blistering noir that put him on the international cinema map, The Wild Goose Lake is another stylish noir/policier. If Black Coal Thin Ice was a cold noir with its wintry setting,...

Review: BACURAU, Resilience and Resolve Against a Mounting Assault

Let's consider what's been happening in Brazil before we talk about the batshit crazy movie that is Bacurau (from the makers of Neighboring Sounds and Aquarius - director Kleber Mendonça Filho and co-director/production designer Juliano Dornelles). In early 2018, Luiz...

Preview: Rendez-Vous with French Cinema 2020

Rendez-Vous with French Cinema returns in March with another edition that exemplifies the variety and vitality of contemporary French filmmaking. The films on display, by emerging talents and established masters, raise ideas both topical and eternal, and take audiences to...

Review: Fruit Chan's MADE IN HONG KONG in 4K Restoration Is a Gloriously Gritty Affair

Fruit Chan's Made in Hong Kong came out right after Hong Kong Handover to Mainland China in 1997. With its youthful energy and boisterous amateur cast, the film reflects rather an anxious and pessimistic view of what lays ahead for...

Review: VITALINA VARELA Gives Its Inhabitants the Poeticism They Deserve

Director Pedro Costa's film is stunning to behold.

Review: I WAS AT HOME, BUT..., The Best Kind of Cinema

Director Angela Schanelec's take on the effects of grief might be less inscrutable than her previous film, 'The Dreamed Path,' but that doesn't make it any less challenging.

Interview: Angela Schanelec on I WAS AT HOME, BUT...

It's never about interpretation, it's never about meaning, it's never about where we are going. Maren doesn't ask these because films are not about where we are going. (laughs) It's about a scene. Then another scene.

Review: ZOMBI CHILD, Voodoo Is Not For You

Director Bertrand Bonello dabbles in the zombie movie genre and turns it into a cautionary tale in the post-colonial, multi-ethnic France.

ScreenAnarchy's Top Ten Films of 2019

As 2019 comes to an end, ScreenAnarchy’s global team of critics and cineastes weighs in with our favourite cinematic offerings from the past 12 months, which saw Netflix lead the charge for cementing the legitimacy of the streaming platforms, while...

Humorous Inventions: Jessica Hausner Talks LITTLE JOE

"I think there is sadness and there is lightness in all things. I don't go out to make a sad movie necessarily. As the saying goes, tragedy plus time is comedy. Then you can get that humor."

Review: In REDOUBT, Artist Matthew Barney Continues His Modern Day Myth-Making

Undoubtedly a continuation of Matthew Barney's unique, modern-day myth-making process, the hypnotic images in 'Redoubt' have to be experienced on the big screen.

SYNONYMS Interview: Nadav Lapid on Israeli Identity, Art of Persuasion, and Actor Tom Mercier

Synonyms, Nadav Lapid's semi-autobiographical film about a young Israeli man struggling with his country's identity, won him many accolades this year, including the Golden Bear at the Berlinale. The film is greatly aided by its fearless star Tom Mercier. I...

New York 2019 Review: VITALINA VARELA, A Hauntingly Beautiful Immigrant Song

As usual, the film is stunning to look at. Every frame is a work of art. Greatly aided by Leonardo Simões' cinematography and João Gazua and Hugo Leitão's sound work, the film gives the lives of its inhabitants the poeticism they deserve.

New York 2019 Review: Grief and Human Folly in Angela Schanelec's I WAS AT HOME, BUT...

A puzzle piece that is never solvable, we instead concentrate on gestures and details inside the frame, in compensation for the lack of dialogue. It's that fragmentary images and colors that we play around our heads long after we leave the theater to make sense of it. Even more so than Godard's, Schanelec's cinema concentrates on the 'visual' part of the medium. It is the best kind of cinema I can think of.

New York 2019 Review: ATLANTICS, A Ghost Story with Female Solidarity Twist

Expertly weaving the current headlines of marine disasters and the ghost story with the female solidarity twist, 'Atlantics' has all the right ingredient to be a success story of a small art film breakthrough, recalling 'Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives.'

New York 2019 Review: Justified Mayhem in Kleber Mendonça Filho's BACURAU

At a glance, without any context of what's happening in Brazil, as the Bacurauans get rid of foreigners and traitors, the film is a silly, tacky man-hunting-man horror movie akin to The Most Dangerous Game or Naked Prey or even Hostel or Ruins. But it isn't. Bacurau highlights the resilience and resolve of Brazilian people against mounting assault of multi-national corporations backed by government military to devastate their beautiful, once burgeoning country in the global crisis era we live in. It's an activist film in a B-Horror movie disguise.

New York 2019: Bertrand Bonello's ZOMBI CHILD Is a Warning to White Folks: Don't Mess with Voodoo

'Zombi Child' digs deeper into hasty western appropriation of everything non-European, non-Anglo American culture. It disregards the cultural, historical, ethnographical significance of the origins of a zombie in exchange for sensationalism. Narcisse's journey back home is more interesting story here.

New York 2019 Review: OH MERCY!, Arnaud Desplechin's LAW AND ORDER

Certainly different from any other Desplechin film I have watched over the years, but no less intriguing. The love he has for his hometown and its inhabitants are undoubtedly palpable. Desplechin is a master storyteller and humanist. The film is a very moving experience.