Review: MEMOIR OF WAR, a Harrowing Tale of Absence and Shame

Skillfully directed and beautifully acted, Memoir of War retains much of Duras' enigmatic, complex human tendencies during war time. Like her other works, it draws from her experiences and amplifies/embelishes many of her major themes - desires, suffering, shame, survivor's guilt, memories....

Interview: Emmanuel Finkiel on Adapting Marguerite Duras' Semi-Autobiographical Work in MEMOIR OF WAR

It's a big challenge to adapt a book by one of the literary giants, Margeurite Duras. Known for her enigmatic, erotically charged, fiercely political writings and films, Duras was one of the key figures in the most significant French literary...

Japan Cuts 2018 Sneak Peek: New Work from Naomi Kawase Leads an Eclectic Slate

Summer in New York City means Japan Society presenting another round of delish contemporary Japanese films, ranging from the weird and macabre, to the sincere and bubblegum apeshit insane! It's all happening, starting today, July 19, and roaring until July...

Marshy's Favourite Asian Movies of 2018 Part 1

2018 is halfway over already, so now is a good moment to cast our eyes back over the last six months, and more specifically, the cinematic offerings that emerged from Asia. Traditionally the first half of the year tends to...

ScreenAnarchy's Top Movies Of The First Half Of 2018

Time flies like a sonofabitch, and this year it seems to do so faster than usual. We are at 2018's mid-point already. Whoa! That does beg the question though: what films have managed to impress and touch us most, so...

New York Asian Film Festival 2018 Sneak Peek: Weird, Wild Summertime Cinema

With the summer heat on full blast this coming weekend in New York, patrons of the five burroughs may want to consider the cool and also very hip insides of a movie theater for proper retreat and enjoyment. And what...

Review: Carla Simón's Autobiographical SUMMER 1993 Reflects Childhood, Tragedy and Love

Catalan director Carla Simón's first feature, Summer 1993, is a touching autobiographical film about the AIDS crisis in the 90s seen through a child's eye.

Preview: New York African Film Festival Celebrates Its Magnificent 25th Year!

With plenty of evidence of the decline of Western Civilization presenting itself on TV news daily,  the New York African Film Festival (known as NYAFF, but not to be confused with the New York Asian Film Fest) gives filmgoers a...

Review: MRS. HYDE, Packing a Punch in Screwball Comedy Form

Serge Bozon's idiosyncratic WWI musical comedy La France impressed me when I watched it some years ago. In it, he demystified war heroics and masculinity with his deadpan humor. In Mrs. Hyde, in his peculiar way, Bozon takes jabs at...

Review: LET THE SUNSHINE IN, Loose and Light Romantic Comedy

I think Claire Denis has been hanging out with Hong Sang-soo a little too much because I never expected her to do a wordy romantic comedy! And the result is delightful! It boasts the best rolling end credit of any...

Art of the Real 2018 Preview

Art of the Real, FSLC's annual celebration of non-fiction cinema is back and remains my most anticipated cinema event even in the city that is not in short supply of great film series all year round. An amazing array of...

Review: ZAMA, Lost in the Heart of Darkness

Lucrecia Martel suggested in her introduction to the sold-out screening of her much anticipated follow-up to Headless Woman that the audience might want to take in Zama like a whiskey. Indeed, it's a heady, at times bitter, at times sweet...

Review: With JEANNETTE: THE CHILDHOOD OF JOAN OF ARC, Bruno Dumont Charts Yet Another Territory

Jeannette is a real gamble of a film. In theory, with everything Dumont is striving for, spiritually and artistically, it should satisfy fans of his work. But intellectually understanding what he is up to and enjoying the actual piece are two different things.

Bruno Dumont on JEANNETTE: THE CHILDHOOD OF JOAN OF ARC and Live Cinema

"I think you can really express deep thoughts and feelings in comedies. You can go really profound in ways you can't do in dramas. Funny is deep, rich and surprising. What counts is to surprise the viewer."

Interview: Arnaud Desplechin Talks ISMAEL'S GHOSTS, His Beguiling New Film

Arnaud Desplechin was in town for his new film Ismael's Ghosts opening stateside and I jumped on the opportunity to interview him again because I adored the film. Desplechin, as usual, is just as unpredictable and sprawling as his films...

Review: In ISMAEL'S GHOSTS, Creative Process Can Use Some Help from Ghosts of the Past

Desplechin deals with a lot of complicated thoughts and emotions on screen, acted out by three very good actors on the top of their game.

Preview: Rendez-Vous with French Cinema 2018

There are different ways to celebrate the arrival of Spring. But if you are in New York, there is only one way to do it, in style: you go see some great new French films at the Film Society of...

Film Comment Selects 2018 Showcases Recent Cinematic Highlights

Curated by its esteemed editors, Film Comment magazine's 18th edition of Film Comment Selects returns to Lincoln Center. A great mix of old and new cinematic gold, this year's lineup includes Ildikó Enyedi’s Berlinale Golden Bear-winner On Body and Soul;...

Blu-ray Review: THE FLORIDA PROJECT, Another Exuberant Celebration of Life on the Fringe From Sean Baker

Director Sean Baker is perhaps the most empathetic filmmaker working today. Two years ago his film Tangerine, famously shot entirely on iPhones, was a runaway critical success. That film, the story of a transgendered prostitute hunting down her philandering boyfriend,...

Review: François Ozon's DOUBLE LOVER Sizzles

I find it funny that the film is being released on Valentines Day against yet another Fifty Shades movie from its franchise. Let me put it simply - French does it better, effortlessly. Steamy and seductive, Double Lover is an infinitely better choice for a date movie.