Tag: sundance

THEM THAT FOLLOW Trailer: Olivia Colman Heads A Family of Snake Handlers in New Horror Film

The debut feature from writing/directing duo Britt Poulton and Dan Madison Savage, Them That Follow fits somewhere between religious mania thriller and body horror, with a bevy of snakes slithering in the background. Bolstered by a great cast in Walter...

Sundance 2019 Interview: PARADISE HILLS Director Alice Waddington Talks About Her Wonderland

As a curator for Slamdance’s Department of Anarchy, I make a point of seeking out weird and wonderful films from around the world. One of my favorites from 2016 was Alice Waddington’s Disco Inferno. Even by our high standards, the...

Sundance 2019: Exclusive Trailer for VR Experience EMERGENCE

Created by Universal Everything and presented by Within, Emergence is not your typical VR experience. In the experience (which is a companion piece to the museum exhibition Fluid Bodies at the Borusan Contemporary in Istanbul) you hover above as thousands...

Sundance 2019 Preview: Premieres, Next, and Spotlight

It's here at last! The Sundance Film Festival kicks off today in Park City, Utah. We've already toured the US Dramatic and World Dramatic competitions, the Midnight section, and the documentaries playing across the programs. We finish things off with...

Sundance 2019: VR Trailblazers Fable Relaunching with New Focus on Virtual Beings

This one is pretty interesting. Last year we were excited about the first teaser episode of VR content studio Fable's Wolves in the Wall. Aside from the beautiful animation and promise of its Neil Gaiman story, the interaction with the...

Sundance 2019 Preview: Documentaries

So far we've taken a tour of the US & World Dramatic competitions and the Midnighters. Our Sundance 2019 preview series continues today ahead of tomorrow's festival kickoff with a look at the non-fiction films playing across the multiple documentary...

Sundance 2019 Preview: All the Midnighters

Our Sundance Film Fest preview series continues today with a tour of each and every film playing in the Midnight section. Thumb back to yesterday to see a few of the highlights in the US Dramatic & World Dramatic Competitions....

Sundance 2019 Preview: The Dramatic Competitions

It's Sundance time again with the snowy nexus of the indie film industry kicking off on Thursday. We've got our customary set of previews coming over the next few days. We'll start things off by shining a spotlight on a...

VELVET BUZZSAW Trailer: Art Eats the Beholder in Dan Gilroy's Latest

Velvet Buzzsaw looks insane. It's a supernatural horror film centered around the cutthroat world of art collecting, buying and selling, where the art literally starts eating its critics and greedy sellers. I'm so in! The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal and...

Sundance 2019: Whopping 112 Features Announced In One Fell Swoop

Piecemeal be damned! Sundance has announced an overwhelming 112 feature films for their 2019 festival coming up on January 24. Why all at once, you ask? Well because that way they can spit out all these impressive stats: For the...

SXSW 2018 Review: THUNDER ROAD Cares

Those fortunate enough to have seen Jim Cummings' Sundance winning short film, Thunder Road (2016), won't soon forget it. Some found it hilarious, some found it awkward, some found it hilariously awkward, perhaps in the vein of human train-wrecks like...

Sundance 2018 Review: HAL, A Great Director of the 1970s Gets His Due

The so-called “New Hollywood” of the 1970s was driven by a number of filmmakers, many of them film school trained, who broke with many established modes of production and benefited from the opportunities afforded them by the collapse of the...

Sundance 2018 Review: KUSAMA - INFINITY, Inside the Life, Work, and Mind of a Legendary Artist

Now at the age of 88, legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is currently one of the most popular and successful artists in the world. Her recent New York gallery exhibition, "Yayoi Kusama: Festival of Life" - featuring her signature "Infinity...

Sundance 2018 Review: RUST, An Intriguing, Split-Screen Portrait of Abuse

Aly Muritiba’s Ferrugem (lit. Rust) opens with a haunting shot of a gymnotiform. It rears its head out of the coral, eyes still-white, mouth plopping open and shut, and body coated in a corroded tint of yellow. “They say when...

HEREDITARY: Watch The Fabulous Trailer For The Sundance Horror Hit

Director Ari Aster turned a lot of heads - and covered a lot of eyes - with his Sundance horror hit Hereditary and it would appear that audiences are not going to have to wait too long for this one...

Sundance 2018 Dispatch: Strong Docus Take Center Stage

Like most years, the 2018 edition of the Sundance Film Festival has had a fantastic crop of new documentary films. With nearly 50 docs unspooling throughout the categories, many of these will undoubtedly be the talked about nonfiction films of...

Sundance 2018 Review: LORDS OF CHAOS and The Humanization of Savagery

For any devotee of heavy metal, transgressive culture, and Satanism (or all of the above), the Lords of Chaos biopic has been a long time coming. Feral House published the first edition of the book all the way back in...

Sundance 2018 Dispatch: A Walk on the Wonderful Weird Side

Yes it's been a particularly strong Sundance for the commercial fare on offer, but some of the surprising and most buzzed about titles at this year's festival fall into a category near and dear to Screen Anarchy readers. That is,...

Sundance 2018 Dispatch: Indie Fare Scores with Commercial Appeal

Sundance has long been the top fest for US independent films looking for a little love from big money distributors. It's expected that the annual lineup includes movies on the spectrum all the way from tiny esoteric documentaries to broadly...

Sundance 2018 Review: WON'T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR? Celebrates a True Compassionate Radical

Deftly weaving a bounty of marvelous archival footage spanning over 40 years, with a sprinkling of talking head interviews with Mister Rogers' cast and crew, as well as his wife Joanne and sons John and James, Oscar-winner Morgan Neville crafts a gentle and enduring chronicle of one of 20th century America's most compassionate radicals.