Review: DIEGO MARADONA Doco, Director Asif Kapadia's Third Masterpiece

Asif Kapadia (Senna, Amy) strikes gold again with the near-perfect biopic of footballer Diego Maradona. The documentary director depicts what many consider ‘the hand of god’ in such a way that highlights both Maradona’s immense skills as a player, and...

L'Etrange 2019 Review: TRUE HISTORY OF THE KELLY GANG, an Entertaining Farcical Yarn

Based on the fictional Peter Carey novel of the same name, True History of the Kelly Gang is a far-flung reimagining and mythologising of the legacy of the armoured clad outlaw. Although the film is less affecting as a result...

Australia Korean Fest 2019: Celebrating Ten Years of KOFFIA

The Korean Film Festival in Australia (KOFFIA) celebrates ten years this year, powered by the Cultural Office, the festival is a wonderful initiative to showcase not only great films, but promote Korean culture as a whole. With exciting special guests...

Melbourne 2019 Review: MATTHIAS ET MAXIME, Xavier Dolan's Intimate Epic

French-Canadian wunderkind Xavier Dolan (there is no other word to describe him) has had a busy year. He has two films releasing in 2019, The Death and Life of John F. Donovan with a top-billed cast, and this far more...

Melbourne 2019 Review: NINA WU, A Clumsy #MeToo Psychological Drama

It would be a disservice to decent thrillers everywhere to give this Taiwanese Cannes entry the same genre label. It is a drama at best, and a very dour one that is devoid of any kind of spark, or thrill....

Melbourne 2019: ScreenAnarchy Reviews First Glance Features

Now for something a little different. The Melbourne International Film Festival, like every year, has revealed its First Glance titles. These are a hodgepodge of different program streamed films and documentaries to whet the appetite prior to the full guide...

Melbourne 2019: Premiere Funded Australian Films Break Records

The Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) is changing hands this year. No longer will long-standing Artistic Director Michelle Carey be steering the ship (into Francophile waters), instead Al Cossar (former festival programmer) presents a no-doubt well curated program with,...

Review: TRANSIT, Beautifully-told Noir

Director Christian Petzold’s (Phoenix) unique adaptation of the same name brilliantly twists the time and place of World War II events. The decision to depict a war narrative in this way disorients the viewer as there is no exposition to...

Review: CLIMAX, Tense, Unpredictable, Terrifying

Master provocateur Gaspar Noe returns with Sofia Boutella and a cast of non-actor dancers to spike the punch and see what happens.

Review: PIERCING Elevates the Notion of Torture Porn with Its Own Style and Tone

Christopher Abbott, Laia Costa and Mia Wasikowska star in a horror-thriller adapted from Ryu Murakami's story, directed by Nicolas Pesce.

Screen Anarchy's Favorite Films of 2018

Here's our favorite films of 2018, as voted on by more than 20 of our contributing writers, who collectively picked 114 films as their favorites. 1. Roma 2. The Favourite 3 (tie). BlacKkKlansman / You Were Never Really Here 5....

Toronto 2018 Review: LET ME FALL Is Sublimely Harrowing

Stella and Magnea, it feels stressful to just write their names after witnessing the excruciating awfulness of their lives. Let Me Fall is centred on their very intense relationship. An attraction that brings with it chaos, reminiscent of the two...

Toronto 2018 Review: THE ACCUSED Offers Compelling Character Study and Little Else

The Accused is first and foremost a character study, one surrounded by a hazy stasis of implication and culpability, a mystery on hold. The last person to see her best friend alive is also the number one suspect for her...

Toronto 2018 Review: CLIMAX Is Something Kicking In

Climax takes its time. Like previous Gaspar Noe joints, the film opens pretentiously with a startling and beautiful image and pompous title cards. Fragments of film credits appear as the dancing crew is introduced, stylishly so of course, on an...

Melbourne 2018 Review: TRANSIT Disorients and Compels as Unique Wartime Noir

Director Christian Petzold’s (Phoenix) unique adaptation of the same name brilliantly twists the time and place of World War II events. The decision to depict a War narrative in this way disorients the viewer as there is no exposition to...

Melbourne 2018 Review: GIRLS ALWAYS HAPPY, Yang Mingming's Biting Dysfunctional Family Film Debut

Girls Always Happy proves anything but in Yang Mingming’s feature film debut. She both directs and stars as Wu, the troubled daughter and one-half of the powerfully dysfunctional family dynamic that anchors the film. The other half is her mother...

Melbourne 2018 Review: PIERCING, Sharp, Sweet and To The Point

From the same deranged brilliant mind behind Japanese horror novel Audition comes Ryu Murakami's latest adaptation from page to film. The short novel Piercing has been given a smart and frantically fun screenplay by Nicolas Pesce, who has a unique take...

Melbourne 2018 Review: WRATH OF SILENCE Violently Twists and Turns an Epic Tragedy

Genre influenced festival fare from China keeps on impressing, and Wrath of Silence may be the best, and most commercially friendly of recent efforts yet. This is the kind of film that grips you, and long after seeing it, parts...

Melbourne 2018 Review: HOLIDAY Will Get Under your Skin

Holiday is an extremely unpleasant film, and yet it is stunningly bright, vibrant and set in a Riviera. This strange contradiction is also reflected in young mob moll Sascha (Victoria Carmen Sonne). Its opening stretch emphasizes the sun-soaked surroundings, but...

Melbourne 2018: MIFF Becomes Cannes With Record Acquisitions

It is that time again, as my personal tenth Melbourne International Film Festival looms on the horizon and I am reminded how old I am getting. What better way to celebrate or commiserate than with a record-breaking splurge of titles...