Tag: japan

Marshy's Favourite Asian Movies of 2018 Part 1

2018 is halfway over already, so now is a good moment to cast our eyes back over the last six months, and more specifically, the cinematic offerings that emerged from Asia. Traditionally the first half of the year tends to...

Udine 2018 Review: THE NAME, an Odd but Curiously Absorbing Japanese Indie

There is more than meets the eye in Toda Akihiro’s The Name, an odd but curiously absorbing mystery drama that appears deceptively simple from the outset. Within its modest trappings, this Japanese indie raises some thoughtful existential questions about personal...

Review: LU OVER THE WALL Mixes Merfolk With Humans, Casting a Fabulous Spell

Really, I did not expect a silly animated Japanese fable with Tex Avery feet to make me cry, but sometimes these things happen. Directed by Yuasa Masaaki, whose estimable credits include Mind Game, Genius Party, and the short Kick-Heart, the...

Udine 2018 Review: THE SCYTHIAN LAMB, A Bizarre Genre Hybrid Infused with Kaiju Folklore

In the sleepy coastal town of Uobuka, the statue of a googly-eyed green sea monster named Nororo towers over a precipice. According to legend, Nororo is an evil presence from the sea and whoever looks into its eyes will be...

Udine 2018: South Korean Drama 1987: WHEN THE DAY COMES Takes Top Honours

Jang Joon-hwan's historical drama 1987: When the Day Comes won the Audience Award at the Far East Film Festival in Udine, Italy, as the festival wrapped up its 20th edition in fine style. Shuichiro Ueda's meta zombie comedy One Cut...

Notes on Streaming: In the Fabulous AGGRETSUKO, Death Metal Enlivens the Working Stiff

Five years after landing her first job, Retsuko, an angry red panda, is losing her will to live. She is an accountant who faces daily, high-pressure demands from her superiors, as well as from her increasingly irritating coworkers. At the...

Far East Film Festival 20 to Open with STEEL RAIN, CROSSROADS: ONE TWO JAGA

The Far East Film Festival launches its 20th edition on 20 April with Netflix’s South Korean spy thriller Steel Rain, playing for the very first time on the big screen. The world premiere of Namron’s Malaysian drama Crossroads: One Two...

Notes on Streaming: A.I.C.O. INCARNATION Bursts Into Action Early and Often on Netflix

The animated series A.I.C.O.: Incarnation, which premiered on Netflix worldwide on March 9, 2018, is terrific. Produced by Japanese studio Bones, directed by Murata Kazuya, and written by Nomura Yuuichi, the series is filled with nicely-choreographed action, while also taking...

Notes on Streaming: Brooding BABYLON BERLIN, Gambling KAKEGURUI, Deathly HOTEL BEAU SÉJOUR

Recently, I've been sampling a few non-English series from the past year or so that are available on Netflix. Are any sufficiently intriguing to justify the time investment to binge-watch them in their entirety? Have you seen any less-heralded shows...

Notes on Streaming: FULLMETAL ALCHEMIST, Good Live Action Without Whitewashing

Here's one fantastic way to avoid charges of whitewashing: just don't do it. A film adaptation of Arakawa Hiromu's Fullmetal Alchemist, directed by Sori Fumihiko, was released in Japanese theaters on December 1, 2017. Now it's arrived as a "Netflix...

Blu-ray Review: In AN ACTOR'S REVENGE, a Female Impersonator Walks Home Alone At Night

Made right in the middle of the most fertile period in the career of director Kon Ichikawa (The Burmese Harp, Tokyo Olympiad), An Actor's Revenge joins the Criterion Collection this week as spine #912. It's a drab tale of melodrama...

Now on Blu-ray: Miike's BLADE OF THE IMMORTAL Shreds in HD

Miike Takashi turns 100(ish) with his latest full length feature, the adaptation of hugely popular manga Blade of the Immortal. The film stars Kimura Takuya as Manji, a swordsman cursed with immortality whose only way out of his hell of...

CURE, MARTY and Early Hou Hsiao-Hsien Coming to Blu-ray from Eureka Entertainment

Eureka! Entertainment, consistently one of our favourite labels here at ScreenAnarchy, has announced its April releases, and there's a lot to be happy about. Marty, Delbert Mann's 1955 Best Picture winner starring the legendary Ernest Borgnine in an Oscar-winning role,...

Review: BEFORE WE VANISH, What Makes Humans What We Are

An alien invasion film, made by Kurosawa Kiyoshi? That almost sounds too good to be true. And it is, kind-of. Yes, there is an alien invasion, but not surprisingly, Kurosawa is not much interested in displays of grand destruction, monsters...

The Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2018

Since 2004 the Japan Foundation has been bringing diverese lineups of finely programmed Japanese cinema to UK shores. Consisting mainly of contemporary works, with the odd anniversary screening and classic to enrichen the mix, this annual Touring Programme offers the...

Notes on Streaming: GODZILLA: PLANET OF THE MONSTERS and THE FROZEN DEAD (GLACE) Both Surprise

Also: Jack Black's serio-comic The Polka King and must-see Irish thriller Bad Day for the Cut. Is it just me, or do January's new offerings on streaming services feel ... er, kinda non-essential? Expectations may play a bigger role this...

HOUSE, LEGEND OF THE MOUNTAIN, BAREFOOT CONTESSA and More Join Eureka in Feb/March

Eureka! Entertainment has been dropping hints about the rest of its Q1 2018 slate for a while now, but today the British label confirmed the street dates for a host of exciting new releases for their beloved Masters of Cinema...

Busan 2017 Review: MAN HUNT, a Disaster in Search of a Director

John Woo’s first contemporary action film produced in Asia for more than 20 years falls woefully short of the director’s best work. Shot entirely in Japan with a mostly local crew, Man Hunt pairs Zhang Hanyu and Masaharu Fukuyama as...

Vancouver 2017 Review: GUKOROKU: TRACES OF SIN, a Haunting Debut

Gukoroku: Traces of Sin, a moody Japanese mystery based on Nukui Tokuro's novel, feels like a pristine, preserved relic from the golden age of Japanese horror (think late 1990's, early 2000's). A self-assured and masterfully shot feature-length debut, the film...

Sitges 2017 Review: OUTRAGE CODA, Kitano Closes His Yakuza Trilogy with a Bang (Yes, Pun Intended)

It's been seven years already since Kitano Takeshi decided that he still had some things left to say about the Yakuza and their world. After taking a break from the genres and themes that turned him into an admired cult...