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New York 2018 Interview: Jim Jarmusch, Eleanor Friedberger, and Rick & Cindy Talk CARMINE STREET GUITARS

I cannot rave enough about Ron Mann's new film, Carmine Street Guitars. I first fell in love with the film when I caught it at the Vancouver Film Festival, where I had the pleasure of hanging out with Ron for...

New York 2018 Interview: Jonah Hill Looks Back on MID90S

Jonah Hill’s directorial debut may be called Mid90s, but that doesn’t mean you need to consider the decade the object of your specific nostalgia to feel this film deeply. As it happens, the film does speak to my exact zeitgeist,...

New York 2018 Review: In THE IMAGE BOOK, Godard Points Us In the Right Direction

With Image Book, there seems to be a concerted effort for Godard to point us in the direction where he sees a corner of the world that is underexposed, underseen and misrepresented by the western world.

New York 2018 Review: COLD WAR, Tragic, Fatalistic Love Story, Briskly Told

Shot again in full frame monochrome by Lukascz Zal, the film is every bit as beautiful as Ida. His use of head space is there and it's lovely. Kulesza has a clear and beautiful singing voice in every style, providing some of the loveliest vocal tracks for the film's great, jazzy soundtrack.

New York 2018 Review: Emotions Run High in Hong Sangsoo's GRASS

When considering the work of Hong Sangsoo, Grass is not groundbreaking or anything, but itis perhaps more cynical and darker than Hong's other films. Still, the director's human comedy continues with slight variations each time with delicious results.

New York 2018 Review: HAPPY AS LAZZARO, An Allegorical Tale of Haves and Have Nots

Lazzaro is someone who is desperately needed in this cynical, cruel world. Alice Rohrbacher's writing shines in bringing out humor and humanity in an whimsical yet pointy allegory full of wonders.

New York 2018 Review: Bi Gan's LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT, The Cinematic Event of the Year

The darkness in Long Day's Journey into Night is comforting, seductive and beautiful, never ominous or threatening. You are taken for an intoxicating ride and you don't want to wake up from this dream. You don't want to get out of the spell Bi Gan put on us. Long Day's Journey into Night is an unforgettable moviegoing experience and the most audacious film in years. Please see it in a theater, if you can.

New York 2018 Review: ASH IS THE PUREST WHITE, Epic Melodrama at its Finest

Ash is the Purest White is a full-on (un)sentimental melodrama in epic scale. It's perhaps Jia's most down to earth, character study work. The long stretch in the middle gains more poignancy as the film goes along and afterwords. Some people reinvent themselves along with the changing times and some people don't. Some things in them though, remain the same. Jia expertly juxtaposes these conundrums, reflecting the soul of a changing nation.

FELICITE Director Alain Gomis on His New Drama: "Let It Happen"

After winning the Grand Jury Prize at Berlin early this year, Alain Gomis's Félicité played as part of the slim but always robust Main Slate at the New York Film Festival. Featuring the great Véro Tshanda Beya Mputu in the...

New York 2017 Review: LADY BIRD Emerges

What separates Lady Bird from other exemplary entries into the beloved coming of age genre, besides its superficial differences, is the personality and layered nuance that Gerwig offers her craft, allowing for an experience that feels fresh in the face of every cliché it transcends.

New York 2017 Review: WONDERSTRUCK, Why We Go to the Movies

“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.” -Oscar Wilde If we were to conduct a poll of all of our writers’ and readers’ favorite live-action kids movies – and I really think...

New York 2017 Review: LET THE SUN SHINE IN, Claire Denis Goes Hong Sang-soo

I think Claire Denis has been hanging out with Hong Sang-soo a little too much because I never expected her to do a wordy romantic comedy! And the result is delightful! It boasts the best rolling end credit of any movie ever.

New York 2017 Review: THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE, Syrian Refugee Crisis, Aki Kaurismaki Style

Extremely silly and endlessly charming, The Other Side of Hope reminds us that the complicated world we are living in doesn't need to be complicated. Through the Kaurismakian glass, the world is filled with decent people and it remains a hopeful place as long as people help each other out.

New York 2017 Review: In FELICITE, a Glimpse of a Modern Woman's Life in Kinshasa

Félicité is not another downbeat film about Africa steeped in miserablist tendencies. Gomis and company don't lose the sight of happiness in the daily lives of its ordinary citizens. There is much humanism and culture and joy to be had in Félicité and I am grateful for it.

New York 2017 Review: Lucrecia Martel's ZAMA Is the Cinematic Highlight of the Year

Finding the Latin American identity, as European settlers and their offspring, has been the continuous source for great literature over 300 years. Throw in the idea of class, masculinity, racism, sense of belonging, you get a very complex picture of what makes up the theme of Zama.

New York 2017: Dark Corner Launches First VR Horror Platform and New Short NIGHT NIGHT

Anyone who has slipped into a VR headset can attest to the visceral nature of the medium and it doesn't take long to jump to the idea that this is going to be an incredible platform for horror. Leading the...

New York 2017 Review: THE FLORIDA PROJECT, A Stunning Work of Authenticity and Humanism

As with Tangerine, Baker uses mostly untrained non-actors to portray people on the skid and just have them run with the materials they were given. The result is a stunning work of authenticity, brimming with humor, heartache and much humanism.

New York 2017 Review: Isabelle Huppert Schools Us in MRS. HYDE

I didn't expect a biting, timely social commentary from Bozon and from Mrs.Hyde. Unlike Robert Louis Stevenson's Jekyll and Hyde, Bozon's two faced, mild mannered school teacher parable has a lot more to do with the society we live in - which lacks self-determination, individual thoughts, and honestly, is more and more very much anti-intellectual.

New York 2016 Review: James Gray's THE LOST CITY OF Z, A Well-Meaning But Lackluster Adventure Film

There is nothing particularly wrong with The Lost City of Z. I buy that one man's obsession- 'a man's reach should exceed his grasp', is worthy subject for a movie. Obviously, it's much less offensive than that last Indiana Jones film or Apocalypto when the depiction of natives are concerned. But do we need another film about a white man's journey to validate another culture's worth in this day and age?

New York 2016 Review: With CERTAIN WOMEN, Kelly Reichardt's Back in Form

If her newly restored/rediscovered debut film Rivers of Grass gave a nod to Bonnie and Clyde and old noir films, with Certain Women, Reichardt does Altman-- an ensemble cast and loosely connected stories structure based on short stories (by a Montana Native, Maile Meloy). But it's still very much Reichardt film: with muted tones, sense of melancholy and loneliness, Certain Women excels at being small, minimalistic character studies that are distinctly a small town Americana. Also, many of her films placed women in precarious situations to observe, but I think this is the first time that she is forefront about exclusively telling women's stories.