Festivals: MIFF

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Melbourne 2019 Review: MATTHIAS ET MAXIME, Xavier Dolan's Intimate Epic

French-Canadian wunderkind Xavier Dolan (there is no other word to describe him) has had a busy year. He has two films releasing in 2019, The Death and Life of John F. Donovan with a top-billed cast, and this far more...

Melbourne 2019 Review: NINA WU, A Clumsy #MeToo Psychological Drama

It would be a disservice to decent thrillers everywhere to give this Taiwanese Cannes entry the same genre label. It is a drama at best, and a very dour one that is devoid of any kind of spark, or thrill....

Melbourne 2019: ScreenAnarchy Reviews First Glance Features

Now for something a little different. The Melbourne International Film Festival, like every year, has revealed its First Glance titles. These are a hodgepodge of different program streamed films and documentaries to whet the appetite prior to the full guide...

Melbourne 2019: Premiere Funded Australian Films Break Records

The Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) is changing hands this year. No longer will long-standing Artistic Director Michelle Carey be steering the ship (into Francophile waters), instead Al Cossar (former festival programmer) presents a no-doubt well curated program with,...

Melbourne 2018 Review: TRANSIT Disorients and Compels as Unique Wartime Noir

Director Christian Petzold’s (Phoenix) unique adaptation of the same name brilliantly twists the time and place of World War II events. The decision to depict a War narrative in this way disorients the viewer as there is no exposition to...

Melbourne 2018 Review: GIRLS ALWAYS HAPPY, Yang Mingming's Biting Dysfunctional Family Film Debut

Girls Always Happy proves anything but in Yang Mingming’s feature film debut. She both directs and stars as Wu, the troubled daughter and one-half of the powerfully dysfunctional family dynamic that anchors the film. The other half is her mother...

Melbourne 2018 Review: PIERCING, Sharp, Sweet and To The Point

From the same deranged brilliant mind behind Japanese horror novel Audition comes Ryu Murakami's latest adaptation from page to film. The short novel Piercing has been given a smart and frantically fun screenplay by Nicolas Pesce, who has a unique take...

Melbourne 2018 Review: WRATH OF SILENCE Violently Twists and Turns an Epic Tragedy

Genre influenced festival fare from China keeps on impressing, and Wrath of Silence may be the best, and most commercially friendly of recent efforts yet. This is the kind of film that grips you, and long after seeing it, parts...

Melbourne 2018 Review: HOLIDAY Will Get Under your Skin

Holiday is an extremely unpleasant film, and yet it is stunningly bright, vibrant and set in a Riviera. This strange contradiction is also reflected in young mob moll Sascha (Victoria Carmen Sonne). Its opening stretch emphasizes the sun-soaked surroundings, but...

ACUTE MISFORTUNE: Watch This Teaser Clip For Biographical Drama of Aussie Artist Adam Cullen

The world premiere of Thomas M. Wright's debut feature film Acute Misfortune, an adaptation of Erik Jensen's biography by the same name, is just around the corner. Set to premiere at the Melbourne International Film Festival in August, Acute Misfortune...

Melbourne 2018: MIFF Becomes Cannes With Record Acquisitions

It is that time again, as my personal tenth Melbourne International Film Festival looms on the horizon and I am reminded how old I am getting. What better way to celebrate or commiserate than with a record-breaking splurge of titles...

Melbourne 2017 Review: PERSON TO PERSON, A Wonderfully Expansive New York Narrative

Expanded from the quirky short of the same name, Person to Person is an effortless riff on a specific indie vibe. Crafted lovingly and naturally by director Dustin Guy Defa, Person to Person moves from his initial concept, following the quest...

Melbourne 2017 Review: INGRID GOES WEST, Hashtag Essential Satire

Truly great films that exist for the moment tackle relevant and contemporary themes, acting at times as a mirror into our own lives and critically picking apart what makes society function. It is refreshing, then, that Matt Spicer’s Ingrid Goes...

Melbourne 2017 Review: RABBIT Falls Down a Meandering Yet Mesmerizing Hole

Luke’s Shanahan’s twisted twin sci-fi thriller Rabbit is a bold and confident debut feature with wonderfully detailed small moments and plot twists that recall some of the best in psychological horror. The film has a focused idea of how it...

Melbourne 2017: Massive Cannes Lineup Covers All Bases

MIFF announcement time again! Every year the Melbourne International Film Festival relishes in its big catches from the Croisette, and this year has basically peaked, with picks appealing to every moviegoer. More after the bump. Thirty-five features from Cannes are...

Melbourne 2017: MIFF 66 Opens With World Premiere of Daniel Radcliffe Lost In The JUNGLE

UPDATED: Watch the first trailer for Jungle below.  The world premiere gala screening of Greg McLean’s (Wolf Creek) new film Jungle starring Daniel Radcliffe will open the 66th Melbourne International Film Festival. Artistic Director Michelle Carey had this to say...

Melbourne 2017: First Glance Entices With Both Local and International Reveals

It is winter here in Australia, and as the sky darkens and the days feel long and grey, First Glance reminds us we are just less than two months away to the Melbourne International Film Festival. Topping the announcement is...

Melbourne 2016 Review: OUR HUFF AND PUFF JOURNEY, Cathartic Kawaii

Daigo Matsui’s latest bubble gum pop nightmare is thankfully a more restrained but no less creative effort from the director with a music video background. Comparable to the loose Wonderful World End, this relatively linear road-trip narrative is brought to...

Melbourne 2016 Review: 11 MINUTES Stylishly and Confidently Embraces its Concept

A new film from Polish master Jerzy Skolimowski, this 78 year old auteur shows no signs that he has slowed down in his latest thrilling venture. It is nearing 5:00 p.m. on an austere but sunny day in Warsaw, Poland...

Melbourne 2016 Review: WHAT'S IN THE DARKNESS Reveals Deeply Ambiguous Nostalgia

What's in the Darkness is a murder mystery, a coming-of-age film and a directorial debut for Wang Yichun. Unfortunately, its poor direction and muddled plot uses far too many metaphors for what is really going on. This deeply nostalgic film is...