Tag: criterion

Blu-ray Review: THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE Explored via Criterion

Refugees travel lightly, but we can unpack this: What is “the other side of hope,” anyway?  Some say it’s despair; others more cynically say it’s truth.  But what they mean with those answers are “opposite,” which is not necessarily the...

Blu-ray Review: Frank Borzage's MOONRISE Glows for Criterion

Director Frank Borzage was never one to wallow in the darkness. He made quality dramas, his work spanning from the silent era into the  early 1960s. Although one of the major filmmakers in his earlier career, we don’t hear all...

Blu-ray Review: THE AGE OF INNOCENCE, Scorsese's Finest, a Transcendent Piece of Mannered Savagery

Timed to coincide with the end of the theatrical run of Daniel Day-Lewis' "final" performance in Phantom Thread (a retirement claim I will take to heart approximately 20 years from now), Martin Scorsese's 1993 period romance The Age of Innocence...

Criterion in June 2018 Gets Very Weird: FEMALE TROUBLE, MANILA IN THE CLAW OF LIGHT and More

We like weird around these parts, so I'm delighted to peruse the latest lineup of upcoming releases from the venerable Criterion Collection and declare it "weird." Largely because I've never heard of some of these films, which I now admit...

Blu-ray Review: In AN ACTOR'S REVENGE, a Female Impersonator Walks Home Alone At Night

Made right in the middle of the most fertile period in the career of director Kon Ichikawa (The Burmese Harp, Tokyo Olympiad), An Actor's Revenge joins the Criterion Collection this week as spine #912. It's a drab tale of melodrama...

Criterion in May 2018: MIDNIGHT COWBOY, MOONRISE, MISHIMA and More

In the immortal words of Harry Nilsson, "everybody's talkin'" about Midnight Cowboy, the first X-rated movie to win an Academy Award. In fact, the film won three Oscars -- Best Picture, Best Director (John Schlesinger), and best adapted script (Waldo...

Blu-ray Review: NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD Shines in New 4K Restoration From The Criterion Collection

George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead has been one of The Criterion Collection's worst kept secrets for several years now. Ever since the planned 50th anniversary restoration was announced, horror fans around the world began saving their pennies...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Celebrates MONTEREY POP's 50th

The newly released complete Monterey Pop box set is vying for the most impressive package in my personal Criterion collection. A little bit about my Criterion collection… I own under 100, more than enough to make me unwilling to do...

Criterion in April 2018: VIRGIN SUICIDES, DEAD MAN and a Bevy of Bergman

Apologies for the lateness of this posting, but since it's just you and me here, devoted fans of classy and extremely well-presented home video, allow me to say: the Criterion Collection's lineup is getting more and more exciting! In April...

Blu-ray Review: I, DANIEL BLAKE, a Triumph of Compassion

It's a bit embarrassing to admit, but before watching I, Daniel Blake for this review, I had never seen a single Ken Loach film. I hadn't been avoiding them, they had just never been in front of me at the...

Blu-ray Review: LE SAMOURAÏ Examines A Solitary Life Lived In Gunmetal Grey

It's a bit intimidating to be the one tasked with delivering an opinion on one the most beloved gangster fims ever made. The legendary Jean-Pierre Melville is one of French cinema's most revered filmmakers, and with good reason. Working adjacent...

Blu-ray Review: Terry Gilliam's JABBERWOCKY on Criterion, Vital, Promising, More Quirky Than Funny

Surprise! The delightful, self-deprecating audio commentary by Terry Gilliam and Michael Palin is what sold me on Jabberwocky, a very British film loosely inspired by Lewis Carroll's poem. Released in the U.K. and the U.S. in April 1977 -- two...

Blu-ray Review: Landmark Lesbian Drama DESERT HEARTS Looks Tremendous and Feels Almost as Good

A woman arrives in Reno by train and will leave the same way, with one seismic difference: she has met and fallen in love with Cay (Patricia Charbonneau), a local artist and resident free-spirit. The year is 1959, and Vivian...

Criterion in February 2018: LIVING DEAD, LAMBS, GALLOWS and More

A fascinating lineup will be on tap from the Criterion Collection in February 2018. Widely available in horribly-presented public domain versions for years, a new 4K restoration of George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead will be rolled out,...

Criterion Gets Nostalgic: THE BREAKFAST CLUB to Warm Hearts in January 2018

When it was released in February 1985, The Breakfast Club was very much 'of the moment,' capturing the zeitgeist of suburban American youth during the teenage years. Coming off the modest success of his debut feature, Sixteen Candles, writer and...

Blu-ray Review: DAVID LYNCH: THE ART LIFE Lives Well via Criterion

To quote a certain giant, it's happening... again. It's happening... again. To quote the giant who created the giant, you drink coffee, you smoke cigarettes, you paint, and that's it. That quote, from filmmaker David Lynch, has been widely used...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Brings 1980's HOPSCOTCH in From the Cold

When one thinks of films built on international espionage and spy movie cat and mouse, an entry like Hopscotch likely isn’t what springs to mind. An ambling and easily digestible affair, this 1980 caper stars everyone's favorite sad turtle of...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's UGETSU Is Scorsese Approved

There's not a whole lot about this titan of classic Japanese cinema that can be further illuminated upon, so I'll keep things simple. The Criterion Collection's relatively new Blu-ray release of Ugetsu is stunning. The new 4K restoration was supervised...

Criterion in November 2017: LE SAMOURAI, DESERT HEARTS, JABBERWOCKY, THE PHILADELPHIA STORY

New digital restorations are the main attractions for four titles that will be arriving via the Criterion Collection in November 2017. Le Samourai is the one that caught my eye first. Jean-Pierre Melville's work has been influential upon more than...

Blu-ray Review: THE BREAKING POINT, Brutal, Merciless Melodrama on Criterion

Remakes are not always bad things. Take, for example, The Breaking Point, based on a novel by Ernest Hemingway. First published in 1937, To Have and Have Not followed the adventures of Harry Morgan, a fishing boat captain in Key...