**** c|Toronto Film Festival|All **** Festivals: Toronto Film Festival

Festivals: Toronto Film Festival

Sort By
From The
Editors
Everything From
Everyone
Most
Loved
Most
Hated
What The
Hell?!

Toronto 2018 Review: DUELLES (MOTHER'S INSTINCT), Stylish Yet Stunted Nostalgic Thrills

Olivier Masset-Depasse’s Duelles is a product of the times. Though a homage to the thrillers of Hitchcock and the aesthetics of Sirk, Duelles’ conceit is one that banks on obsessions of current pop culture: nostalgia and the resurgence of female-led...

Toronto 2018: SEW THE WINTER TO MY SKIN Is South Africa's Deserved Oscar Contender

With Sew The Winter To My Skin, writer director Jahmil X.T. Qubeka has quietly - the film has very sparse dialogue - yet audaciously - it also boasts some extraordinary visceral imagery - established his place among the best filmmakers...

Toronto 2018 Interview: Kristen Stewart, Laura Dern, Savannah Knoop, and Justin Kelly on JEREMIAH TERMINATOR LEROY

The JT LeRoy story - or hoax, as some would prefer to call it - all comes down to how one chooses to perceive it. Those who say “nay”, scoff it off as the story of a malicious literary swindler...

Toronto 2018 Review: LET ME FALL Is Sublimely Harrowing

Stella and Magnea, it feels stressful to just write their names after witnessing the excruciating awfulness of their lives. Let Me Fall is centred on their very intense relationship. An attraction that brings with it chaos, reminiscent of the two...

Toronto 2018 Review: THE MAN WHO FEELS NO PAIN, A Big Screen Love Letter To All Things Action

There is nothing subtle about Vasan Bala's (Peddlers) second film, The Man Who Feels No Pain. In this boisterous action comedy, Bala's passions and obsessions are writ large across the screen with a genuine affection that is hard to deny....

Toronto 2018 Review: Nandita Das' MANTO Dissects The Controversial Life Of One Of India's Greatest Writers

Full disclosure: I know next to nothing about the writer Saadat Hasan Manto, and what I do know has largely been gleaned from the press in advance of this film or other media sources. I expect many of my film...

Toronto 2018 Review: DIAMANTINO, A Big Hearted Goofball Vs. The World

Imagine you are the world's greatest soccer player. You create art with the way you move your feet, the way you touch the ball; it's like a dance that inspires tears of joy in the eyes of anyone who watches...

Toronto 2018 Review: IN FABRIC Is More Thriftshop Than Selfridges

Any new Peter Strickland film is cause for celebration. The Berkshire auteur has delivered some of the most delightful unease (and wicked humour) in cult cinema since 2009's Katalin Varga. In Fabric is his most wildly fluctuating film, where the highs...

Toronto 2018 Review: THE WIND, Loneliness Brings Out the Demons

"Does it ever stop? The wind?" Two women converse over the natural elements and, although it isn't mentioned, the effect it has on their state of mind. This being sometime in the late 1800s, there is no television or radio...

Toronto 2018 Review: NON-FICTION, A Comedy That Is Both Social And Media

"More people read my blog than my books," decries one of the characters in Olivier Assayas's latest film, Non-Fiction. The response from another is, that those blog readers are more likely than anyone else to buy those books. And a...

Toronto 2018 Review: THE ACCUSED Offers Compelling Character Study and Little Else

The Accused is first and foremost a character study, one surrounded by a hazy stasis of implication and culpability, a mystery on hold. The last person to see her best friend alive is also the number one suspect for her...

Toronto 2018 Review: HIGH LIFE, Eroticism and Solitude in Deepest Space

Space is dark, a blackness that you cannot even imagine. And it is silent. Not middle-of-nowhere silent where there is still the occasional breeze that moves the sand or a sense of the air or sun which seems to have...

Toronto 2018 Review: WIDOWS, Intelligent and Slick Commercial Cinema

Viola Davis, Michelle Rodriguez and Elizabeth Debicki star in Steve McQueen's top-quality heist movie.

Toronto 2018 Review: CLIMAX Is Something Kicking In

Climax takes its time. Like previous Gaspar Noe joints, the film opens pretentiously with a startling and beautiful image and pompous title cards. Fragments of film credits appear as the dancing crew is introduced, stylishly so of course, on an...

Toronto 2018 Review: KINGSWAY, A Well-acted, If Slight, Dramedy

As a Vancouverite, my interest in seeing Bruce Sweeney's Kingsway stemmed almost entirely from the fact that it is shot and set in my city. Vancouver is, in fact, the third-largest centre for film and television production in North America,...

Toronto 2018: IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK, A Glorious Anthem of Love

Perhaps it is true what is said, that the world looks different when you’re in love. Colours are fuller and brighter; even a dingy basement apartment can seem like a palace; and you have all the hope that, no matter...

Toronto 2018 Review: AMERICAN DHARMA Wrestles With Our Current Political Carnage

The third chapter in Errol Morris's documentary interview trilogy on significant figures in USA policy creation and thinking is described by the director himself as "his horror movie." Indeed, the Oscar-winning documentarian showcased a very considerate and quite repentant Secretary...

Toronto 2018 Review: MOUTHPIECE, The Internal Conflict of Grief

For those who have a relationship with their parents, there are likely points, no matter how good that relationship is, when that relationship is difficult. This can be especially true between the parent and child of the same gender identity:...

Toronto 2018 Review: SUMMER SURVIVORS, A Sensitive Look at Mental Health

Upon reading a plot description of Summer Survivors -- the debut feature by Lithuanian filmmaker Marija Kavtaradze -- one may imagine a quirky indie comedy with touches of the absurd. While the film does have its share of lighthearted, funny...

Toronto 2018 Review: SHOPLIFTERS, Scavenging on Multiple Levels

It’s a common platitude, the choices we make defining us. But what about those we don’t make? The country we live in, the class we’re born into, our family, etc. They may or may not define who we are, but...