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Busan 2020 Review: SNOWBALL Gently Strikes with Familiar but Well-Told Tale

A wide variety of films find their way to the Busan Film Festival every year, but one thing you can always count on is the polished, youth-driven social indie that has become the de-facto Korean indie template, at least on...

Book Review: ROADS TO NOWHERE, An Intimate Look at the Films of Kelly Reichardt, or, It's All About the Cow

I've said it before and I'll say it again: not only is Kelly Reichardt one of the best American indie filmmakers currently working, she's also one of the best in the world. With seven feature films under her belt, her...

Review: THE COURIER, Modest Spy Thriller

Benedict Cumberbatch, Merab Ninidze and Rachel Brosnahan star in a thriller, directed by Dominic Cooke.

Review: Galician Fire in Oliver Laxe's FIRE WILL COME

Laxe observes his beloved Galician region and its people simply and quietly. The old way of living is rapidly disappearing. The notion of time is more visible in these parts of the world because they are close to nature.

Busan 2020 Review: LIMECRIME, Tone Deaf Hip-hop Biopic

As a self-confessed Korean hip-hop ‘stan’, Limecrime is a dismal disappointment. This is Directed by the actual former Limecrime duo LEE Seunghwan and YOO Jaewook, who moved on from performing together in the early aughts and are no longer part...

Busan 2020 Review: A LEAVE, Responsibilities Clash in Compelling Character Study

Given that it successfully ousted a president after months of mass protests, which peaked with well over two million participants, it should perhaps come as little surprise that Korea is a country where protesting is widespread. For many it's an...

Montreal Nouveau 2020 Review: THE BOOK OF VISION, Visual Beauty Hides A Flimsy Narrative

The study and treatment of ailments of the human body is certainly one of the most fascinating of histories; the way look back in shock on how illnesses were once treated (leeches, blood-letting), people of the future might one day...

Warsaw 2020 Review: PREPARATIONS TO BE TOGETHER FOR AN UNKNOWN PERIOD OF TIME, Low-Key Love and Madness

Lili Horvát´s sophomore feature offers an introverted take on l´amour fou in slow-burning psychological melodrama about a romance that could have been.

Review: KINDRED, Mother Does Not Always Know Best

Tamara Lawrance, Jack Lowden and Fiona Shaw star in director Joe Marcantonio's psychological thriller.

Montreal Nouveau 2020 Review: RED MOON TIDE, We Are Left to the Witches and Monsters

In Galicia, where forests meat a rugged and dangerous coastline, Rubio has gone missing. The local village's resident diver, he would search for the bodies of those lost to the rough seas, or possible eaten by the monster that lurks...

Busan 2020 Review: THE PREDATORS, Stylish Italian Dark Comedy Debut

Twenty-eight year old newcomer Pietro Castellitto debuts with this assured, sharply scripted black comedy about class, wildly different families and the individuals that comprise them. It was frankly shocking to learn the Director of this film is so young, as...

Busan 2020 Review: GOOD PERSON Compels With Its Dizzying Morality Play

With confident direction in the first few frames alone, this debut feature from JUNG Wook is a masterful mystery. Good Person draws comparisons to European cinema; epic yet intimate portrayal of ethics, morality and human nature in the contemporary. These...

70s Rewind: DEATH LINE, People Are Hungry Underground

Donald Pleasance stars in a grungy and gritty tale of going underground, directed by Gary Sherman and now streaming on The Criterion Channel.

Montreal Nouveau 2020 Review: KILL IT AND LEAVE THIS TOWN, An Animated and Discordant Purgatory

In one scene in Mariusz Wilczyński’s Kill It and Leave This Town, characters are taking a long train ride, telling stories in fits and starts, as the vehicle crosses what seems like an endless parallel universe populated by bird people...

Busan 2020 Review: HAPPY OLD YEAR; Minimalist Design, Maximalist Selfishness

The philosophy or art of letting go; the artifice of such a belief or methodology questioned in a purposely staged environment is how Happy Old Year introduces its jaded protagonist Jean (Chutimon Chuengchar, Bad Genius). She is interviewed by a...

Sitges 2020 Review: THE SHOW, Alan Moore's Darkly Comedic Foray Into Feature Films

A man of many faces searches for an artifact stolen from a wealthy benefactor. His search leads him to the haunted town of Northampton. It is a town occupied by Voodoo gangsters, masked adventurers, Noir-era private dicks and a violent...

Busan 2020 Review: VESTIGE Ponders the Ineffable with Grace and Mystery

Two Korean masters of arthouse cinema join forces for one of Busan's most intriguing offerings this year. Commissioned by the Muju Film Festival, Vestige features two mid-length films from Kim Jong-kwan (Worst Woman) and Jang Kun-jae (A Midsummer's Fantasia), which...

Review: REBECCA, Latest Adaptation of Du Marnier's Novel Pales in Comparison

Though more than deserving (an understatement, surely), Alfred Hitchcock (North by Northwest, Vertigo, Rear Window, Shadow of a Doubt) never won an Academy Award for Best Director. But his first American film for uber-producer David O. Selznick, Rebecca, the first...

Review: SYNCHRONIC, The Science of Altered States

The Justin Benson/Aaron Moorhead oeuvre has successfully wandered in the fields of science fiction and horror, examining questions of the meaning and purpose of existence, the nature of love, and the concept of time through some serious philosophical discussions and...

Blu-ray Review: THE HIT, a Funny, Reflective Crime Story

The 1984 film The Hit is out today on Criterion Collection --- and they're having a 50% off flash sale right now, so if you've been waiting to score some awesome box sets, get to it ASAP. (For those of...