Tag: newyorkfilmfestival

New York 2020 Review: UNDINE, Folklore Gets Fresh Makeover in Beguiling Christian Petzold Romance

Paula Beer and Franz Rogowski star in director Christian Petzold's reinvention of a mythical water creature story that parallels the history of the city of Berlin.

New York 2020 Review: THE WOMAN WHO RAN, Hong Sang-soo Again Explores Monotony vs. Chaos

Kim Min-hee, Lee Eun-mi, and Kwon Hae-hyo star in director Hong Sang-soo's deceptively simple yet deliciously playful film.

New York 2020 Review: NOTTURNO, Legacy of Colonialism in the Middle East

Directed by Gianfranco Rosi ('Sacro GRA,' 'Fire at Sea'), the documentary is biting and enormously affecting.

New York 2020 Review: BEGINNING, Powerful Indictment of Religious Patriarchy

Directed by Dea Kulumvegashivli, the powerful drama is one of the most self-assured debut films in recent memory.

New York 2020 Review: Jia Zhangke's SWIMMING OUT TILL THE SEA TURNS BLUE Presents a History of Literature

Director Jia Zhangke's documentary tells the story of changing times, migration and coming home. And his love for literature.

New York 2020 Review: In Tsai Ming-liang's DAYS, A Wordless, Intimate Encounter

Lee Kang-sheng stars in director Tsai Ming-liang's most intimate and touching film in years.

New York 2020 Review: ON THE ROCKS, Sofia Coppola and Bill Murray Reunite

Sofia Coppola’s films are imbued with a bratty strained independent punk rock aesthetic that often riffs on generic genres and themes with a strong focus on characters that refuse to conform. On The Rocks is a distant memory of this...

New York 2020 Review: MALMKROG, Prophetic Vision of Europe in Philosophical Terms

Directed by Cristi Puiu, the film deals with dense, heady philosophical musings from another century. But context is everything.

New York 2020 Review: THE HUMAN VOICE, Quintessential Almodovar, Plus Tilda Swinton in Short Form

Hopefully, this isn't the first and last collaboration between Pedro Almodovar and Tilda Swinton, because this short film is an extremely enjoyable experience.

New York 2020: THE CALMING Finds Inner Peace in Wondering

The Calming lends something bigger than man-woman tit-a-tat. It is rather, relieving of various pressures in life through constant movement.

New York 2019 Review: YOUNG AHMED, Portrait of the Religious Extremist As a Young Man

The latest social-realist drama from Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, starring Idir Ben Addi, Othmane Moumen, and Myriem Akheddiou, is well-intentioned, but unfortunately has little to say about Islamist radicalization.

New York 2019 Review: THE IRISHMAN, Martin Scorsese's Epic Return to the Gangster Movie Genre

Martin Scorsese's epic gangster saga, starring Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, Al Pacino, Ray Romano, Harvey Keitel, and Anna Paquin, falls short of his masterpieces 'Goodfellas' and Casino,' but is still well-made and magnificently acted.

New York 2018 Interview: Jim Jarmusch, Eleanor Friedberger, and Rick & Cindy Talk CARMINE STREET GUITARS

I cannot rave enough about Ron Mann's new film, Carmine Street Guitars. I first fell in love with the film when I caught it at the Vancouver Film Festival, where I had the pleasure of hanging out with Ron for...

New York 2018 Interview: Jonah Hill Looks Back on MID90S

Jonah Hill’s directorial debut may be called Mid90s, but that doesn’t mean you need to consider the decade the object of your specific nostalgia to feel this film deeply. As it happens, the film does speak to my exact zeitgeist,...

New York 2018 Review: COLD WAR, Tragic, Fatalistic Love Story, Briskly Told

Shot again in full frame monochrome by Lukascz Zal, the film is every bit as beautiful as Ida. His use of head space is there and it's lovely. Kulesza has a clear and beautiful singing voice in every style, providing some of the loveliest vocal tracks for the film's great, jazzy soundtrack.

New York 2018 Review: Emotions Run High in Hong Sangsoo's GRASS

When considering the work of Hong Sangsoo, Grass is not groundbreaking or anything, but itis perhaps more cynical and darker than Hong's other films. Still, the director's human comedy continues with slight variations each time with delicious results.

New York 2018 Review: Bi Gan's LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT, The Cinematic Event of the Year

The darkness in Long Day's Journey into Night is comforting, seductive and beautiful, never ominous or threatening. You are taken for an intoxicating ride and you don't want to wake up from this dream. You don't want to get out of the spell Bi Gan put on us. Long Day's Journey into Night is an unforgettable moviegoing experience and the most audacious film in years. Please see it in a theater, if you can.

New York 2017 Review: LADY BIRD Emerges

What separates Lady Bird from other exemplary entries into the beloved coming of age genre, besides its superficial differences, is the personality and layered nuance that Gerwig offers her craft, allowing for an experience that feels fresh in the face of every cliché it transcends.

New York 2017 Review: WONDERSTRUCK, Why We Go to the Movies

“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.” -Oscar Wilde If we were to conduct a poll of all of our writers’ and readers’ favorite live-action kids movies – and I really think...

New York 2015 Review: STEVE JOBS Is A Dud

The first question is: do we really need another Steve Jobs movie? Then, what merits does the life of the billionaire co-founder of Apple have, to prompt three movies (Jobs, Steve Jobs: the Man in the Machine, and now Steve...