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Lund Fantastic 2020 Review: JUMBO, We So Seldom Look on Love

How do we know when we love? How do we know what we love? How do we make the decision (and it is a decision) that we will love what we love, for as long as we are allowed? And...

Busan 2020 Review: SELF-PORTRAIT 2020, Long yet Riveting Odyssey of a Drunk Savant

I'll admit I went into Self-Portrait 2020 with a fair amount of trepidation. Here is a nearly three-hour documentary that follows a man who has given up on life, turned to the bottle and now roams the streets of Central...

Busan 2020 Review: STEEL RAIN 2: SUMMIT Dives into Thrilling and Surprisingly Funny Geopolitical Waters

Released three years, ago, the geopolitical action-thriller Steel Rain was a solid success on the charts but one that was completely overshadowed by two films that hit theaters within a fortnight of its release, Along with the Gods: The Two...

Busan 2020 Review: YOUNG ADULT MATTERS, An Explosive and Frequently Engrossing Runaway Teen Drama

Three years after his abrasive debut Park Hwa-young, director Lee Hwan returns to Busan with Young Adult Matters, an intense and frequently engrossing follow-up set in the same world of foul-mouthed, unpredictable and violent runaway teens. While it inherits many...

Busan 2020 Review: DELIVER US FROM EVIL, A Slick and Undemanding Action-Thriller Romp

It's hard being an assassin, especially when you take your work home with you. Even more so when that work turns out to be the psycho brother of your last target, who's chased you to a foreign country where you're...

Busan 2020 Review: SNOWBALL Gently Strikes with Familiar but Well-Told Tale

A wide variety of films find their way to the Busan Film Festival every year, but one thing you can always count on is the polished, youth-driven social indie that has become the de-facto Korean indie template, at least on...

Busan 2020 Review: LIMECRIME, Tone Deaf Hip-hop Biopic

As a self-confessed Korean hip-hop ‘stan’, Limecrime is a dismal disappointment. This is Directed by the actual former Limecrime duo LEE Seunghwan and YOO Jaewook, who moved on from performing together in the early aughts and are no longer part...

Busan 2020 Review: A LEAVE, Responsibilities Clash in Compelling Character Study

Given that it successfully ousted a president after months of mass protests, which peaked with well over two million participants, it should perhaps come as little surprise that Korea is a country where protesting is widespread. For many it's an...

Montreal Nouveau 2020 Review: THE BOOK OF VISION, Visual Beauty Hides A Flimsy Narrative

The study and treatment of ailments of the human body is certainly one of the most fascinating of histories; the way look back in shock on how illnesses were once treated (leeches, blood-letting), people of the future might one day...

Montreal Nouveau 2020 Review: RED MOON TIDE, We Are Left to the Witches and Monsters

In Galicia, where forests meat a rugged and dangerous coastline, Rubio has gone missing. The local village's resident diver, he would search for the bodies of those lost to the rough seas, or possible eaten by the monster that lurks...

Busan 2020 Review: THE PREDATORS, Stylish Italian Dark Comedy Debut

Twenty-eight year old newcomer Pietro Castellitto debuts with this assured, sharply scripted black comedy about class, wildly different families and the individuals that comprise them. It was frankly shocking to learn the Director of this film is so young, as...

Busan 2020 Review: GOOD PERSON Compels With Its Dizzying Morality Play

With confident direction in the first few frames alone, this debut feature from JUNG Wook is a masterful mystery. Good Person draws comparisons to European cinema; epic yet intimate portrayal of ethics, morality and human nature in the contemporary. These...

Montreal Nouveau 2020 Review: KILL IT AND LEAVE THIS TOWN, An Animated and Discordant Purgatory

In one scene in Mariusz WilczyƄski’s Kill It and Leave This Town, characters are taking a long train ride, telling stories in fits and starts, as the vehicle crosses what seems like an endless parallel universe populated by bird people...

Busan 2020 Review: HAPPY OLD YEAR; Minimalist Design, Maximalist Selfishness

The philosophy or art of letting go; the artifice of such a belief or methodology questioned in a purposely staged environment is how Happy Old Year introduces its jaded protagonist Jean (Chutimon Chuengchar, Bad Genius). She is interviewed by a...

Sitges 2020 Review: THE SHOW, Alan Moore's Darkly Comedic Foray Into Feature Films

A man of many faces searches for an artifact stolen from a wealthy benefactor. His search leads him to the haunted town of Northampton. It is a town occupied by Voodoo gangsters, masked adventurers, Noir-era private dicks and a violent...

Busan 2020 Review: VESTIGE Ponders the Ineffable with Grace and Mystery

Two Korean masters of arthouse cinema join forces for one of Busan's most intriguing offerings this year. Commissioned by the Muju Film Festival, Vestige features two mid-length films from Kim Jong-kwan (Worst Woman) and Jang Kun-jae (A Midsummer's Fantasia), which...

Sitges 2020 Review: VICIOUS FUN, The Name of The Movie Says it All

Never has marketing a film been so easy!    Q: So. What's your film about?  A: (points to title)   Joel is an obnoxious film critic and wisenheimer who writes for a national horror rag. One night Joel follows Bob,...

Montreal Nouveau 2020 Review: THERE ARE NO FALSE UNDERTAKINGS, Vignettes of the Odd and Surreal

Having moved into television, Denzel Washington is hoping to land the role of Angel in a reboot of Buffy the Vampire Slayer; he's interested in the role because of Angel's struggle with testicular cancer. But alas, being too old, he...

Nightstream 2020 Review: THE QUEEN OF BLACK MAGIC Reimagines An Indonesian Horror Classic With A Gruesome Modern Eye

If you like your horror movies super gross, you are in for a treat with director Kimo Stamboel's sophomore solo feature, a loose remake of 1981's Indonesian classic, The Queen of Black Magic. With the world beginning to rediscover this...

Nightstream 2020 Review: DINNER IN AMERICA, A Sweetly Chaotic Molotov Cocktail Of Dirty Punk Romance

When rough and tumble mysterious stranger Simon (Kyle Gallner) crosses paths with the socially awkward Patty (Emily Skeggs), they form an unusual bond that sends them careening toward chaos, and loving every minute of it in Adam Rehmeier's Sundance breakout...