Festivals Reviews

Sort By
From The
Editors
Everything From
Everyone
Most
Loved
Most
Hated
What The
Hell?!

Fantasia 2018 Review: Miike's LAPLACE'S WITCH Is A Bit Of A Slog

The concept of Laplace's Demon states that, "if someone (the Demon) knows the precise location and momentum of every atom in the universe, their past and future values for any given time are entailed; they can be calculated from the...

Fantasia 2018 Review: LUZ, Where Desire Gets Avant Fucking Garde

A demon or some kind of evil entity travels from a Chilean boarding school to a German Police station to ensnare the woman it desires to possess. The simplicity of the basic story kernel belies the stylish and convoluted manner in...

Fantasia 2018 Review: MEGA TIME SQUAD, A Whipsmart Rush of Time Travel Tomfoolery

One fine day in his sleepy coastal New Zealand town, after being booted out of living in his mom's garage, petty criminal wannabe (in the local parlance, "Bogan") John, and his dopey pal Gaz, decide to screw over their boss,...

Fantasia 2018 Review: NEOMANILLA, A Ripped From The Headlines Neo-Realist Masterpiece

Young street kid Toto is in a very tough spot. His drug dealing brother is in jail, and the local meth pushers think Toto is ratting them out to get the police to secure his release. He spends the few...

Fantasia 2018 Review: PROFILE Plays A Horrific Game With Online Identity

"You would never lie to me," asks Abu Bilel Al-Britani, a hunkish and charming Jihadi recruiter for ISIS, as he skypes from with Amy Whittaker in her South London flat. But we are well into the age of online 'Catfishing,' and Amy...

Fantasia 2018 Review: COLD SKIN Never Quite Warms Up

A weather scientist, looking to escape his former life with twelve months of dutiful isolation to the Crown on the eve of World War I, is assigned to a small island in the South Atlantic, just inside the Antarctic circle....

Fantasia 2018 Review: PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF DESIRE, A Disturbing Look at China's Ecosystem of Internet Celebrities

There are some frightening dynamics of China’s capital and technology sectors at play in People’s Republic Of Desire, a documentary on the YY Live streaming platform. Relatively unknown in the West (who have their own online addictions issues with Facebook,...

Fantasia 2018 Review: NIGHTMARE CINEMA, Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Grue

The time honoured Anthology film. There are no shortage of them on the festival circuit, particularly in horror-genre circles. Rarely, however, do they come with such pedigree as Nightmare Cinema. It seems Mick Garris has not entirely scratched the itch...

Fantasia 2018 Review: DANS LA BRUME Is A Crafty Survival Thriller

It is sometime in the very near future, and a strange but severe earthquake has not only knocked the power out across all of Paris. The tremor has also has released an ocean-sized toxic plume from under the city; a...

Edinburgh 2018 Review: SAVING BRINTON Unearths Early Cinema Magic

“I like to save things, especially if it looks as if they’re too far gone,” says Michael Zars at the beginning of this documentary, and it’s soon apparent how true that statement is. Dogs, cats, plants, church steeples and ancient...

New York Asian 2018 Dispatch: Asian Noir in New York

Don’t tell the U.S. President, but if this edition of the NYAFF is any indication, his nation is probably running a massive trade deficit with Asia when it comes to film noir, China in particular. Here’s a quick look at...

London Indian 2018 Review: UP, DOWN, & SIDEWAYS, The Song Of Nagaland Fascinates

They're called "li". The traditional working songs of the rice farmers of Nagaland in India's Northeast. A kind of mesmerizing polyphonic conversation among the many men and women who might be out in the paddies at a given time, the...

London Indian 2018 Review: MEHSAMPUR Is A Challenging, Bracing Hybrid Documentary

On March 8th, 1988, Punjabi folk music icon Amar Singh Chamkila and his partner Amarjot Kaur were shot and killed as they pulled into the Punjabi town of Mehsampur. The crime remains unsolved, and the killers were never caught. In...

Oak Cliff 2018 Review: I AM NOT A WITCH, A Superb Film From A Prodigious New Talent

A young girl, unremarkable in any way, is walking down a path in rural Zambia. Suddenly, a woman walking ahead of her carrying a large bucket or water falls to the ground, losing her load. As the fallen woman looks...

Oak Cliff 2018 Review: VIRUS TROPICAL Explores The Life Of One Young Girl Searching For Her Grand Adventure

From first time feature director Santiago Caicedo, Virus Tropical is a wonderful look at the challenge of growing up through the eyes of a middle class girl from Quito in Ecuador. The film is a black and white animated feature...

London Indian Film Festival 2018 Review: WHAT WILL PEOPLE SAY Takes A Hard Look At A Clash Of Cultures

Director Iram Haq's What Will People Say is a powerful experience that has the potential to ruffle feathers on each side of the argument regarding the responsibilities of immigrants to assimilate into their adopted cultures. An Norwegian-Pakistani woman, here Haq...

Jeonju 2018 Review: A GOOD BUSINESS, NK Defector Doc Poses Fascinating Ethical Quandaries

Some of the best documentaries are those that don't tell you what to think but choose instead to explore a subject from different viewpoints and angles, let the images speak for themselves and give the viewer a chance to make...

Jeonju 2018 Review: WINTER'S NIGHT Takes a Colorful and Introspective Trip Down Memory Lane

Returning with his third film to the festival where he picked up the top Korean Competition prize for his debut A Fresh Start, director Jang Woo-jin delivers his most carefully designed work to date with Winter's Night, one of this...

Jeonju 2018 Review: GRADUATION Scores Top Marks for Its Young Director and Star

Making films is hard anywhere, but in Korea, where so many youths dream of entering what is a successful yet relatively small industry, it's a particularly tricky proposition. Thus it comes as little surprise that so many debut features focus...

Jeonju 2018 Review: HELLO DAYOUNG, Korean Comedy Goes Full Chaplin

For the third year on the trot, and after already receiving two prizes, director Ko Bong-soo returns to the Jeonju International Film Festival with his third work, Hello Dayoung. Largely working with the same troupe of actors, who are taking...