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Shivers 2019 Review: FEHÉRLÓFIA Provides Mythical Psychedelic Visions

The Shivers Film Festival in the German city of Konstanz can pride itself with a killer line-up of new films each year, but the roster always also contains the odd classic or two. This year, Ridley Scott's seminal Alien got...

Shivers 2019 Review: WHY DON'T YOU JUST DIE!, A Wild, Violent Russian Roller Coaster Ride

Evil cannot touch me... This is the mantra of our poor, clueless hero, Matvey (Aleksandr Kuznetsov) as he prepares to enter the home of his girlfriend's family in director Kirill Sokolov's violent, kinetic action explosion, Why Don't You Just Die!...

Shivers 2019 Review: THE MORTUARY COLLECTION

Ryan Spindell's horror anthology is a visual feast, and Clancy Brown is fantastic in it.

Morbido 2019 Review: RENDEZ-VOUS, A Strong Single-Take Thriller From Mexico

Lili is excited and nervous about her date with Eduardo. She me him on an online dating service app. The night starts a little rocky at first, Eduardo is half an hour late and not answering his phone. He finally...

Morbido 2019 Review: DIABLO ROJO PTY, Local Folklore on Display in Panama's First Horror Film

Miguel is the owner and operator of one of the last Diablos Rojos (Red Beasts), garishly painted and lit old-fashioned school buses that were once the popular choice of transit for the people of Panama. Late at night, after a...

Morbido 2019 Review: LUZ THE FLOWER OF EVIL Is A Gorgeous Act of Provocation

The sudden loss of a mother can extract a terrible psychological toll on any family - in any culture or any era. Consider Luz*: The Flower Of Evil, one of the most extreme cases in this regard. A widowed father,...

Busan 2019 Review: COMING HOME AGAIN, A Personal Chamber Piece on Food and Filial Piety

In Coming Home Again, a Korean American man returns home to take care of his dying mother in this modest and sensitively-rendered chamber piece that takes place in the span of one day on New Year’s Eve. Adapted from a...

Brooklyn Horror 2019 Review: THE YELLOW NIGHT, A Trip To A Dark Future

Brazillian horror has become noticeable in recent years among fans of the genre who have ventured into that particular landscape, where one can find everything from creature features to giallos to slashers and beyond. It's a rich terrain for experimentation...

Austin 2019 Review: THE VICE GUIDE TO BIGFOOT, In Search of Post-Modern Laughs

Ben Emond co-wrote and stars in the paranormal comedy, directed by Zach Lamplugh.

Vancouver 2019 Review: THE LIGHTHOUSE, Startling, Darkly Funny Maritime Nightmare

After a sleeper hit and critical success with 2015's The Witch, writer/director Robert Eggers crafts a startling, darkly funny maritime nightmare: The Lighthouse. Like Eggers' debut feature, The Lighthouse is fully committed to the aesthetics, language, and atmosphere of its...

Brooklyn Horror 2019 Review: SEA FEVER, Familiar Setting, Familiar Genre, Distinct Atmosphere

Hermione Corfield stars as a marine biologist in director Neasa Hardiman's feature debut.

Montreal Nouveau 2019 Review: L.A. TEA TIME, The Journey is the Destination

All artists have their heroes: the ones whose work we admire, whose work likely inspired their own, and whom they would give a lot just to spend an hour with to better understand their hero and inspiration. Much of this...

Montreal Nouveau 2019 Review: ADORATION, Cupid is Dangerously Blind

British author Evelyn Waugh once wrote that there is a kind of love that children have before they know its meaning, something sweet and innocent, full of kindness and joy without facade or self-awareness. As children grow into teenagers, what...

Busan 2019 Review: LIGHT FOR THE YOUTH Conveys the Desperate Struggles of South Korea's Younger Generation

The acute hardships of South Korea’s youth and the dog-eat-dog mentality of the corporate workplace are the focus of writer-director Shin Su-won’s fourth feature, Light for the Youth. With Glass Garden (2017), Madonna (2015) and Pluto (2012), Shin’s previous films...

Montreal Nouveau 2019: MONOS, Teenaged Soldiers Descent into Madness

For a long time, likely one of the few things most people knew about Colombia is that is was a country with a huge number of kidnappings. So many, in fact, that there was a radio show that ran for...

Montreal Nouveau 2019 Review: MAKE ME UP, Intense & Biting Feminist Satire

Combining archival audio footage, science fiction, cultural criticism, and reality television parody into a film, and Scottish multimedia artist Rachel Maclean's feature Make Me Up weaves a complex and at times overwhelming tapestry as a biting feminist satire. Juxtaposing bright...

Vancouver 2019 Review: STILL HUMAN Features Incredibly Moving Performances

Directed by Oliver Siu Kuen Chan, Still Human tells the story of a friendship that blossoms between a man living with a disability and his live-in Filipina caregiver. Veteran Hong Kong actor Anthony Wong plays Cheong-wing, who was paralyzed in a...

Montreal Nouveau 2019 Review: DEERSKIN, Killer Style in a Killer Jacket

Georges (Jean Dujardin) is a man on a mission. After driving across what must be the length of France (and dumping his courdoroy jacket in a gas station toilet along the way - literally the toilet), he comes to the...

Montreal Nouveau 2019 Review: BAIT, Lo-Fi Vision of Class Warfare by the Sea

One of the main things I miss about print film is the texture; there is something about how an physical object, going through a projector, conveys the layers of physicalness necessary to create it. It conveys as much for the...

Vancouver 2019 Review: PAIN AND GLORY, Restrained and Reinvigorated

Antonio Banderas does perhaps his best work to date in Pain and Glory, for which he deservedly won Best Actor at this year's Cannes Film Festival. He slips surprisingly well into Pedro Almodovar's loafers -- easier than sneakers to put...