It's Andy On Versus Donnie Yen In This Exclusive SPECIAL ID Clip

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It's Andy On Versus Donnie Yen In This Exclusive SPECIAL ID Clip
Donnie Yen fans in the US will be able to indulge in the screen icon's latest martial arts offering, Special ID, with its limited theatrical run beginning tomorrow at LA's Laemmle NOHO 7 and the film also hitting VOD platforms to show off Donnie doing what Donnie does best: Punching people.

Donnie Yen is Detective Chen Zilong - but the criminal underworld knows him as "Dragon" Chen, a dangerous but effective enforcer. When rivalries explode with the reappearance of an old enemy and a brutal murder, the Triads close ranks and unleash a series of executions - with Chen at the top of the list. Undercover and under attack, he has no choice but to rely on a new partner (Jing Tian) and his knowledge of the streets to get out alive. It's the only chance he's got.

We've got an exclusive clip from the film for you down below, and fight fans will go away happy as it's a one on one fight sequence between Yen and up and coming fight star Andy On. Take a look below!

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More about Special Identity

Around the Internet

DooKMarch 6, 2014 4:50 PM

Great fight scene! Can't believe most people are bashing this. The predictable story is understandable but criticizing the action?!

tman418March 6, 2014 9:49 PM

Yeah. I wonder what happened to the good ole days of just enjoying an action film for the action, you know?

QinlongMarch 7, 2014 8:24 AM

I agree, the action looks superb. I guess Donnie Yen's reputation as a trail-blazing choreographer means people expect something new or bigger for every movie.

DooKMarch 7, 2014 10:50 AM

Great point!

RMMarch 14, 2014 6:34 AM

actually, i found the action to be underwhelming, especially when compared to SPL/FP:
- mahjong fight: why throw in "comedy" (falling over mahjong bricks) in a fight that's not supposed to be funny? why stay that long on the ground (donnie)? why the needless use of wire fu (ken lo's flying knee into the table)?
- the short "fight" between donnie and andy on: like i said, too short and not for real, sadly
- kitchen fight: the only real good fight in the movie, even then one can argue how wise it would be to go for a takedown on someone carrying a knife
- policewoman beating up one of the no name bad guys clad in black: sigh... no offense, but why does the director even think we want to see her "kicking ass"? apparently everyone will just watch her beating up one guy and do nothing
- policewoman vs. collin chou, again, no one wants to see the woman fighting, but if that's how we finally get to see collin in action, sure, i guess? oh wait, ended before i got excited.
- donnie yen vs. andy on, supposed to be the spectactular fight the audience has waited for the whole movie: disappointment, compare this to SPL/FP's fight scenes and this was nothing like it, i agree it was technical though where donnie tries to show some more jiujitsu, the various positions and the triangle to armbar to triangle transition for example, but still, not exciting enough.
- donnie yen vs. collin chou: oh wait, this fight didn't happen. seriously, EVERYONE who knew donnie and collin were playing in this movie was expecting a fight between the two, how on earth did they not give us this?!

and i was only talking about the action part, i didn't even start on the story which was actually unpredictable to me, since so many strange things happened without an explanation at all and mysterious people (the dude with the sniper rifle) get introduced without proper introduction.

all in all, i was VERY disappointed by this movie. part of it might have to do with because i was in hong kong when this movie was released, i went to it the first day it was released and after the first 15-20 minutes of the movie i felt sorry for the friends and family i brought to the movie, because the movie was so horrible.

DooKMarch 14, 2014 3:30 PM

"mahjong fight: why throw in "comedy" (falling over mahjong bricks) in a
fight that's not supposed to be funny? why stay that long on the ground
(donnie)?"

Because alot of the fight emphasizes on character arc to authenticate the action rather than straightforward "kick-assness" that you see too much these days. Most may want to see more punches and kicks exchanged between Yen and K. Lo HK style but that's was not Donnie's intention at all. Emotionally, characteristically, and strategically it sells in many ways. First of all, Donnie's character wasn't a perfect defender against kicks which is evident when he goes up against K. Lo's thaiboxing and using kicks wasn't useful so he had to seek other tactics to defeat him because he was being outclassed in that regard. The most important thing when fighting someone is not to play HIS game but make your opponent play YOUR game. For example, If a person boxes, you kick. If someone grapples, fight long-range. So when Yen threw K. Lo to the ground and locked his arm, that's when he knew what to do to prevent himself from being attacked further. Another thing that was remarkable was Donnie using his childish/cocky personality to defeat K. Lo. In real fights, taunting your opponent can throw them off their game and causing them to attack emotionally instead of tactically, which was a character trait made perfect sense for Yen's character to take advantage of in his situation against K. Lo's kicks and aggressiveness. I respect your opinion but to me, this was step up from SPL/Flash Point in terms of MMA/grappling as well as combining action with emotions.

"- kitchen fight: the only real good fight in the movie, even then one
can argue how wise it would be to go for a takedown on someone carrying a
knife"

True. But then again, one can also argue how everything turns out the way it does. This is a case of showcasing how you use different tactics and emotions to overcome the most troublesome obstacles. Sure, Yen gave his attackers a good beating without a scratch but he was obviously scared as he tried to find a way out and call for help. But he put on a "brave face" in front of his attackers to convince them that he was not someone to mess with and that softened them so much to the point that they couldn't do much but counter with little to no bravery left in them. Yen's
natural cockiness and intent to agitate his opponents into acting
irrationally with anger was again something to his advantage and a detail I found very smart for such a situation.

"- policewoman beating up one of the no name bad guys clad in black:
sigh... no offense, but why does the director even think we want to see
her "kicking ass"? apparently everyone will just watch her beating up
one guy and do nothing"

I heard there were Mainland politics involved that resulted in less action scenes for Yen and some for Jing Tian. Yeah, the movie would've benefited more if they just gave more action to Yen.

"- policewoman vs. collin chou, again, no one wants to see the woman
fighting, but if that's how we finally get to see collin in action,
sure, i guess? oh wait, ended before i got excited."

Yes, it was pointless that nothing was made out of that brief moment considering that Collin was onboard and it could've at least been a longer fighter than it ended up being. Mainland Politics were involved again here.

"- donnie yen vs. andy on, supposed to be the spectactular fight the
audience has waited for the whole movie: disappointment, compare this to
SPL/FP's fight scenes and this was nothing like it, i agree it was
technical though where donnie tries to show some more jiujitsu, the
various positions and the triangle to armbar to triangle transition for
example, but still, not exciting enough."

It's normal to to compare a movie to previous works of similar nature. And people would have high expectations on things that got them interested in the first place which is perfectly understandable. But that's not how I see it. Special ID IS supposed to be different to SPL/Flash Point in how the MMA/grappling is utilized, both in its' execution and cohesively to the story and the characters. Like I mentioned, Yen put characteristic and emotional details in his choreography (very rare in today's action movies), and the final fight is no exception. That's why you see Yen get beat up pretty bad this time and the fact that he had to be tactical to overcome his opponent, this case using MMA/grappling which is whole point of the movie's action scenes anyway. Overall, I'm very pleased with Yen's accomplishment and proves that MMA/grappling works onscreen if putting effort in presenting it differently in each attempt.

rebel_scumMarch 16, 2014 12:11 PM

It's a chore to sit through, regardless of the action.

DooKMarch 16, 2014 5:26 PM

If you feel that way about the whole movie, more power to you.

Hanajun ChungMarch 16, 2014 9:49 PM

On an action standpoint, while I see what you're response is saying (and agree with most of it), I unfortunately found the overall experience be still somewhat weak. It's not that Yen's fighting wasn't tactical or reflective of his character, it's just that this time around, I could really tell the punches were being pulled (especially the wing chun punches against On). Don't get me wrong, Yen's choreography has energy and grit for sure, but I felt it lacked impact in Special Id.

Despite SPL/FP being different films with their own strengths and weaknesses, the action in those films are so good that they're recommendable. When my friends and I dick around and watch action scenes on youtube (especially martial arts scenes) the final bout between Yen and Chou in FP or any of the third act duels in SPL (Yen vs Wu Jing or Yen vs Sammo Hung) will get recommendations. Even though Special Id is fairly new, I doubt it's something anyone would ask to see. I mean, especially since The Raid 2: Berandal is coming out in weeks.