Olive Films Announces New Signature Series

Contributing Writer; Canada (@ChrisDWebster)
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Olive Films Announces New Signature Series

Olive Films have been quietly releasing a huge swath of catalog titles on Blu-ray over the last few years. This has been great for cineastes still interested in growing their physical media libraries, but for folks who enjoy special features, the releases have been lacking as they are usually bare bones affairs.

Perhaps as a way to rectify this, Olive have announced a new Signature Series that will highlight cult favorites, time-honored classics, and under-appreciated gems.

Taking a page from the Criterion Collection, each Olive Signature edition will boast a pristine audio and video transfer, artsy cover art, and an abundance of bonus material.

The Signature Series will kick off on September 20 with the release of two titles, High Noon and Johnny Guitar.

High Noon features include:

  • Mastered from new 4K restoration
  • A Ticking Clock: Academy Award-nominee Mark Goldblatt on the editing of High Noon
  • A Stanley Kramer Production: Michael Schlessinger on the eminent producer of High Noon
  • Imitation of Life: The Blacklist History of High Noon with historian Larry Ceplair and blacklisted screenwriter Walter Bernstein 
  • High Noon: a visual essay with rarely seen archival elements, narrated by Anton Yelchin
  • Sight and Sound with editor Nick James
  • Theatrical trailer

For more information on the Signature series visit Olive Films

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Blu-rayDVDHigh NoonJohnny GuitarOlive FilmsSignature Series

Around the Internet

One-EyeJuly 11, 2016 5:27 PM

I remember when I first saw HIGH NOON and I was astounded at how tight and packed with plot and character it was. If this movie was remade today with the same plot and characters it would easily be over two hours long.

Actually, I just read William Friedkin's memoir 'The Friedkin Connection' and he had to deal with the legendary editor Elmo Williams during the making of THE FRENCH CONNECTION. Williams was an executive at Fox at the time and was quite the pompous pain in the ass. Anyway, Williams claimed that because he shot second unit on HIGH NOON (mostly inserts of the clock, the station etc) that he was responsible for the film's success.

ManateeAdvocateJuly 12, 2016 11:55 AM

Oh wow. High Noon is grand. Guaranteed purchase.