NYC Weekend Picks, Feb. 24-26: Jordan Peele Curates, Oscar Nominated Shorts and Best Picture Winners, and Doc Fortnight 2017

This Oscar weekend's offerings include:  At BAM Rose Cinemas, the continuation of the series "The Art of the Social Thriller," curated by Jordan Peele (half of the brilliant sketch duo Key & Peele), of films that inspired his feature directorial debut Get Out,...

Review: THE COMEDIAN, Not Very Funny Despite Its Title

There is a very fine performance embedded in Taylor Hackford’s otherwise enervating, overlong, patience-trying, and not very funny film The Comedian. However, that performance is not delivered by the putative headliner, Robert De Niro. He plays Jackie Burke, a comic who once starred in a...

NYC Weekend Picks, Jan 27-29: Bruce Lee, Kubrick and Scorsese Classics, 70s Universal, and BEHEMOTH

Happy Year of the Rooster! And if, among the fireworks, parades, and consumption of chicken, duck, dumplings and longevity noodles, you can squeeze in some time for moviegoing, there's plenty to choose from. Just in time for the Chinese New...

Slamdance 2017 Review: KURO Spins a Spellbinding, Exquisitely Photographed Tale

Don’t you wonder sometimes ’Bout sound and vision … – David Bowie, “Sound and Vision” When you’ve seen a countless number of films over your lifetime, the effect can be somewhat numbing, especially after viewing many examples of standard variations...

Slamdance 2017 Review: AEROTROPOLIS, An Elegantly Made Portrait of (Sub)Urban Alienation

Li Jheng-neng's debut feature is an elegant, microbudget vision of urban/suburban anomie, which has qualities that will be familiar to intrepid art filmgoers, especially those conversant with the films of Li's fellow Taiwanese countryman Tsai Ming-liang.

NYC Weekend Picks, Jan 20-22: Dealing with Trump, Early Scorsese, Adapting Patricia Highsmith, Poetic Docs From Iran, and a Jarmusch Classic

I wasn’t with it, but just that very minute, it occurred to me the suckers had authority … – Public Enemy, “Black Steel in the Hour of Chaos”   Today is when it all goes down, figuratively and literally. Regardless of...

NYC Weekend Picks, January 13-16: Bowie, Rohmer, Spielberg, ROCKY and CREED, and More

This week, we feature an especially rewarding set of recommendations for viewings over the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday weekend. And I can't help but note the irony of celebrating the life of one of the greatest Americans who ever...

NYC Weekend Picks, January 6-8: "Illuminating Moonlight," First Look Festival, Best Films of 2016, More

One of the very best things about living in New York City is the embarrassment of riches it offers movie lovers, whether you're a hardcore cinephile, a casual fan, or anywhere on the spectrum in between. You don't have to...

ScreenAnarchy's Top 10 Movies of 2016

This year, 23 Screen Anarchists from 11 countries around the globe shared with us 129 films for consideration in our collective top ten movies of 2016. Our criteria was simple: an individual contributor could include a film on their ballot...

Review: ALWAYS SHINE, an Intensely Personal and Satisfying Genre Picture

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny...

Margaret Mead 2016 Continues to Innovate In Its 40th Year

The 40th edition of the Margaret Mead Film Festival, screening at the American Museum of Natural History through October 16, continues its mission of bringing audiences artful and fascinating global perspectives on the most pressing issues of our time. Women's...

NYC Happenings: IFP Film Week 2016 Expands to Include More Public Events and Community Involvement

Founded in 1979, the Independent Filmmaker Project (IFP) is the largest and oldest not-for-profit organization dedicated to independent film. Besides their year-round programs and initiatives supporting independent filmmakers, their best known events are the Gotham Awards, a major highlight of...

NYC Happenings: "The Master: Philip Seymour Hoffman," A Fittingly-Titled Tribute to One of Our Finest Actors

The phrase “greatest actor of his/her generation,” is one that gets tossed around very often, and as with any hyperbolic description of this kind, some are more deserving of this praise than others. But the great, towering actor Philip Seymour...

Review: HAPPY HOUR, An Absorbing Long-Form Masterwork

When I first settled down to view Ryusuke Hamaguchi’s Happy Hour earlier this year at its New Directors/New Films festival press screening, its great reputation preceded it, a reputation that included some uniquely anomalous features, unusual even in the context...

Preview: Japan Cuts 2016, As Dynamic as Ever

Japan Cuts, Japan Society's annual festival of contemporary Japanese cinema, turns 10 this year. What the value of a film festival is may seem easy to talk about in terms of age and program focus. It  can also be hard...

Korean Movie Night New York's "Master Series: Lee Joon Ik" Celebrates a Master of Period Drama and Comedy

A frequent guest to the New York Asian Film Festival, Korean director Lee Joon-ik is a brilliantly accomplished and remarkably versatile director, equally adept at both period and contemporary pieces. However, much of his popularity at home and his acclaim...

NYC Happenings: MoMA's Naomi Kawase Retrospective Explores Her Poetic and Intensely Personal Cinema

The films of the acclaimed Japanese director Naomi Kawase are truly original and like no one else's. Kawase was raised in the ancient rural prefecture of Nara, and was essentially self-taught, since she lived in a place that lacked a...

Review: MISCONCEPTION, Entertaining, Well-Made And Powerful

Jessica Yu has created some of the finest and most formally innovative documentaries of the past decade, such as In the Realms of the Unreal (2004) and Protagonist (2007). Her latest film Misconception, which had its world premiere at last...

Preview: New York Asian Film Festival Celebrates 15 Gonzo Years

Picture it: The early part of the 21st Century. Dial-up modems sing shrilly throughout our homes. Bush & Cheney plot and scheme like Batman villains. A young Canadian music and movie enthusiast starts a website to talk about the stuff...

Human Rights Watch 2016 Review: GROWING UP COY, Transgender Rights And A Family in the Eye of A Media Storm

At first glance, six-year-old Coy Mathis seems to be just like other little girls her age. She’s madly in love with Justin Bieber, and has his posters plastered over the walls in her room. Her favorite color is pink, and...