Review: FOLK HERO & FUNNY GUY, Great Performances Mark the Arrival of a Remarkable Filmmaking Talent

One of the key ingredients for a successful film is a good title. And one thing that makes for a good title is one that is perfectly descriptive of the movie within.   Jeff Grace's witty, diverting feature debut Folk...

Tribeca 2017 Review: THE LOVERS, Break Up To Make Up, That's All They Do

Azazel Jacobs is a young filmmaker who’s continuing a family tradition. His father is avant-garde cinema legend Ken Jacobs, and his mother Flo and sister Nisi are also participants, all of them having worked on each other’s films. (Ken and Flo played the protagonist’s parents in Azazel’s 2008...

Tribeca 2017 Review: THE CIRCLE, Where All Are Trapped in the Social Media Web

The subject of our hyper-connected, social media-based cultural landscape is a fruitful and relevant one for filmmakers, and one with great potential for mass audience interest, given how pervasive this is in our daily lives. David Fincher’s Facebook origin story The Social Network can be looked upon as the gold...

Tribeca 2017 Review: THE PUBLIC IMAGE IS ROTTEN, A Legendary Musician's Musical and Personal Reinvention

“Ever get the feeling you’ve been cheated?” John Lydon aka Johnny Rotten’s acerbic question to the audience at the end of the Sex Pistols’ disastrous 1978 U.S. tour may have marked the end of that group, but for Lydon himself,...

Tribeca 2017: Ten Notable Fest Selections

The Tribeca Film Festival returns for its 16th edition, running at various venues through April 30. As usual, it doesn't lack for boldface names and big events, opening with Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives, a documentary about the legendary...

Review: In THE DISCOVERY, People Are (Literally) Dying to Experience the Afterlife

… Who would fardels bear,  To grunt and sweat under a weary life,  But that the dread of something after death,  The undiscovered country, from whose bourn  No traveller returns, puzzles the will,  And makes us rather bear those ills we have  Than...

"Beyond Godzilla" Highlights Lesser-Known Japanese Sci-Fi/Fantasy Films

"Beyond Godzilla: Alternative Futures and Fantasies in Japanese Cinema," a film series screening at Japan Society from March 24 through April 8, looks at the long history of Japanese tokusatsu eiga, or special effects films. On the heels of Shin Godzilla, the latest...

New Directors/New Films 2017: 6 Must-See Selections

The 46th edition of the Film Society of Lincoln Center and Museum of Modern Art's New Directors/New Films Festival screens from March 15 through 26. As always, it's an eclectic international showcase of interesting new talents and approaches to cinematic...

NYC Weekend Picks, Feb. 24-26: Jordan Peele Curates, Oscar Nominated Shorts and Best Picture Winners, and Doc Fortnight 2017

This Oscar weekend's offerings include:  At BAM Rose Cinemas, the continuation of the series "The Art of the Social Thriller," curated by Jordan Peele (half of the brilliant sketch duo Key & Peele), of films that inspired his feature directorial debut Get Out,...

Review: THE COMEDIAN, Not Very Funny Despite Its Title

There is a very fine performance embedded in Taylor Hackford’s otherwise enervating, overlong, patience-trying, and not very funny film The Comedian. However, that performance is not delivered by the putative headliner, Robert De Niro. He plays Jackie Burke, a comic who once starred in a...

NYC Weekend Picks, Jan 27-29: Bruce Lee, Kubrick and Scorsese Classics, 70s Universal, and BEHEMOTH

Happy Year of the Rooster! And if, among the fireworks, parades, and consumption of chicken, duck, dumplings and longevity noodles, you can squeeze in some time for moviegoing, there's plenty to choose from. Just in time for the Chinese New...

Slamdance 2017 Review: KURO Spins a Spellbinding, Exquisitely Photographed Tale

Don’t you wonder sometimes ’Bout sound and vision … – David Bowie, “Sound and Vision” When you’ve seen a countless number of films over your lifetime, the effect can be somewhat numbing, especially after viewing many examples of standard variations...

Slamdance 2017 Review: AEROTROPOLIS, An Elegantly Made Portrait of (Sub)Urban Alienation

Li Jheng-neng's debut feature is an elegant, microbudget vision of urban/suburban anomie, which has qualities that will be familiar to intrepid art filmgoers, especially those conversant with the films of Li's fellow Taiwanese countryman Tsai Ming-liang.

NYC Weekend Picks, Jan 20-22: Dealing with Trump, Early Scorsese, Adapting Patricia Highsmith, Poetic Docs From Iran, and a Jarmusch Classic

I wasn’t with it, but just that very minute, it occurred to me the suckers had authority … – Public Enemy, “Black Steel in the Hour of Chaos”   Today is when it all goes down, figuratively and literally. Regardless of...

NYC Weekend Picks, January 13-16: Bowie, Rohmer, Spielberg, ROCKY and CREED, and More

This week, we feature an especially rewarding set of recommendations for viewings over the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday weekend. And I can't help but note the irony of celebrating the life of one of the greatest Americans who ever...

NYC Weekend Picks, January 6-8: "Illuminating Moonlight," First Look Festival, Best Films of 2016, More

One of the very best things about living in New York City is the embarrassment of riches it offers movie lovers, whether you're a hardcore cinephile, a casual fan, or anywhere on the spectrum in between. You don't have to...

ScreenAnarchy's Top 10 Movies of 2016

This year, 23 Screen Anarchists from 11 countries around the globe shared with us 129 films for consideration in our collective top ten movies of 2016. Our criteria was simple: an individual contributor could include a film on their ballot...

Review: ALWAYS SHINE, an Intensely Personal and Satisfying Genre Picture

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny...

Margaret Mead 2016 Continues to Innovate In Its 40th Year

The 40th edition of the Margaret Mead Film Festival, screening at the American Museum of Natural History through October 16, continues its mission of bringing audiences artful and fascinating global perspectives on the most pressing issues of our time. Women's...

NYC Happenings: IFP Film Week 2016 Expands to Include More Public Events and Community Involvement

Founded in 1979, the Independent Filmmaker Project (IFP) is the largest and oldest not-for-profit organization dedicated to independent film. Besides their year-round programs and initiatives supporting independent filmmakers, their best known events are the Gotham Awards, a major highlight of...