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Dublin 2017 Review: NAILS Slam The Coffin Shut In This Horror Hospital

The current decade has been a very good one for Irish horror. While they haven't quite reached the same kind of transgressive peak that extreme French horror did in the last decade with Frontiere(s), Inside, and Martyrs, Ireland's current horror...

Review: BITTER HARVEST Is Bad Canadian Borscht

In between the two World Wars, the then nascent Soviet Union, in a barbarous act of mismanaged nation building, starved north of seven million Ukrainians to death, all the while violently appropriating the land and the crops from the 'bread...

Review: THE GIRL WITH ALL THE GIFTS, A Heady Mix of Arthouse, Genre and Zombies

Opening with the eponymous girl locked in a cell and counting upwards to a thousand, The Girl With All The Gifts may as well be ticking off the sheer number of zombie films that a fan of the genre is...

Review: DRIFTER Runs Out of Gas in a Trope Tainted Wasteland

Christian von Hoffman's wasteland thriller DRIFTER starts strong only to be betrayed by a weak second half

Now on Blu-ray: TRAILER TRAUMA 3: '80s HORRORTHON Is the Ultimate Party Mixtape for Horror Fans

I am a huge fan of movie trailer compilation tapes. When I was a teenager I would whip together my own party mix tapes on VHS to slap together some of the most fun, goriest, funniest bits of horror movies...

Review: AMERICAN FABLE Casts a Magical, Mysterious Spell

In 1982, Reagan's America looked pretty darn convincing ... on television ... if you were 11 years old. But for hundreds of farmers across the heartland of the U.S.A., times were desperate. They were losing their farms, their homes, their...

Berlinale 2017 Review: BERLIN SYNDROME, Cate Shortland's Skin-Crawling Thriller

From Jutin Kurzel's Snowtown in 2011 to Ben Young's recent Hounds of Love at last year's Venice Biennale, Australia has developed a real knack for messed up cinema, and Cate Shortland's recent Screen Australia and Film Victoria supported skin-crawler is...

Spokane 2017 Review: DIANI & DEVINE MEET THE APOCALYPSE

The closing film of the Spokane International Film Festival (SpIFF) is traditionally an uplifting affair that celebrates the creative spirit, hosted in the hallowed 102-year old Bing Crosby (neé Clemmer) Theater. This year’s selection - the charming, snide, hilarious Diani...

Review: In Shanker Raman's GURGAON, Blood Makes The Grass Grow

Family can be a tricky thing. The bonds forged between blood relations are often tenuous and fraught with jealousy and distrust. You can't choose the people with whom you make those bonds, and as a result, those people aren't always...

Review: GROWING UP SMITH, A Cross Cultural Comedy with Heart

In director Frank Lotito's Growing Up Smith, one year is enough to provide a lifetime of memories for a little Indian boy plunked down in the midwest in 1979. The Bhatnagar family, father Bhaskar (Anjul Nigam), mother Nilani (Poorna Jagannathan...

Review: DARK NIGHT, A Meaningful Document of America at Seismic Crossroads

Close your eyes. Picture the various scenes: You gotta keep your head down. She runs her hands through your hair; it's so short it must feel like walking barefoot on freshly cut grass. The burnt orange dye bleeds into your...

Now on Blu-ray: SUDDENLY IN THE DARK and NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND DESIRES From Mondo Macabro

Mondo Macabro has done it again with another killer pair of Blu-ray releases for films you didn't even know you couldn't live without. This time around the company tackles a duo of sexy horror films from opposite ends of the...

Now on Blu-ray: PARENTS and THE LAIR OF THE WHITE WORM From Vestron Video

Lionsgate Home Video's new specialty imprint, Vestron Video Collector's Series, is back with another pair of '80s video store classics. Bob Balaban's Parents, a pitch black satirical look at utopian surburban life, and Ken Russell's The Lair of the White...

Now on Blu-Ray: MEN & CHICKEN and KLOWN FOREVER, A Delightful Danish Duo From Drafthouse Films

There must be something funny in the water in Denmark because they definitely have a knack for comedy. Drafthouse Films recently released a pair of hilarious Danish films on Blu-ray and DVD and we're here to give you the low...

Sundance 2017 Review: Damn Those Unbearably Funny L.A. TIMES

L.A. Times plays like the flipside of the coin that is Whit Stillman’s aristocratic male-centric New York, where snoots court debutantes and intellectualize feeling superior. In writer/director/star, Michelle Morgan’s West Coast, a group of friends attempt to find love, happiness,...

Rotterdam 2017 Review: SEXY DURGA, One Terrifying Night In Darkest India

Man is a dangerous beast. Long ago, before the time of cinema, before the time of television, and certainly before the time of the Internet, the Indian subcontinent was a land mostly known as a fruitful place for the nightmares...

Sundance 2017: BLACK HOLES Is A Gloriously Stylish Animated Oddity

Short film programs at major film festivals are a tricky animal, always struggling to draw attention away from the longer form material on display. And yet for those who dip in there are some absolute gems to find. And Laurent...

Review: THE SALESMAN, Asghar Farhadi's Riveting Tale of Revenge and Shame

Farhadi has a real knack for portraying guilt of ordinary people. The degree of guilt he is showing might be a little too dramatic to pass as a real life. But that degree is small enough to make us uncomfortable. Deeply philosophical with human entanglements, culture, tradition, class and morality, The Salesman is a complex drama with a great narrative pull that is a richly rewarding experience.

Rotterdam 2017 Review: STILL NIGHT, STILL LIGHT (MES NUITS FERONT ÉCHO), A Dreamy, Daring Debut

One of the reasons we watch films is to see if we can unearth something of ourselves in others' work. In this way it is a search for kindred spirits across strange and distant lands that fall so close to...

Sundance 2017 Review: BUSHWICK, A Provocative and Chilling Picture of America in Crisis

Ever since I saw Cooties in 2014 and fought with our founding editor in order to review the film (I lost out, of course) I’ve been anxious to see how Cary Murnion and Jonathan Milott would follow up on their...