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Slamdance 2017 Review: AEROTROPOLIS, An Elegantly Made Portrait of (Sub)Urban Alienation

Li Jheng-neng's debut feature is an elegant, microbudget vision of urban/suburban anomie, which has qualities that will be familiar to intrepid art filmgoers, especially those conversant with the films of Li's fellow Taiwanese countryman Tsai Ming-liang.

Slamdance 2017 Review: DIM THE FLUORESCENTS, Work is Theater

In the tradition of films that pull back the curtain on the inner workings of showbiz, writer/director Daniel Warth’s Dim The Fluorescents shows us the ins and outs of… corporate training seminars. It’s not the most exciting place to be,...

Slamdance 2017 Review: DAVE MADE A MAZE With Entertaining Traps

With its explosion of creativity, its thrilling concept and its lovely characters, Dave Made A Maze is a fine example of how a creative team can overcome the restrains of a tight budget to offer a fun ride.

Slamdance 2017 Review: WITHDRAWN Maxes Out its Miserabilism for Introspection

Aaron (Aaron Keogh), who left his mother's home, lives with Adrian in a basement-like apartment that permits each of them to live their own lives, clean their clothes, make their food, watch never-ending conspiracy videos and tutorials on Youtube, as...

Slamdance 2017 Review: Laugh At Awful People in NEIGHBORHOOD FOOD DRIVE

Neighborhood Food Drive’s synopsis should be a clue as to what kind of film it is: “Awful idiots fail at throwing a party over and over”. Director Jerzy Rose definitely wasn’t out to make a feel-good comedy with those emotional...

Slamdance 2017 Review: WEXFORD PLAZA, A Small Slice Of Real Life

Wexford Plaza plays out its story on a small and intimate scale, a picture of suburban life which probably repeats itself in many an abandoned strip mall. Joyce Wong didn't feel the need to go big, and this affecting little slice of life is all the better for it.

Slamdance 2017 Review: CORTEZ, A Quietly Affecting and Beautifully Acted Debut

It's not easy to find cinema that transports the viewer into a place filled with people who genuinely seem to have existed before the film begins and long after it rolls credits. Cortez offers just that.

Sundance 2017 Review: I DON'T FEEL AT HOME IN THIS WORLD ANYMORE, One Hell of a Ride

Most of us met Macon Blair onscreen as a the bearded, disheveled lead of Blue Ruin. Homeless and hapless, the character soon evolved into one of the more startling and indelible in indie cinema, a bravado performance that justifiably gained...

Review: DETOUR, Christopher Smith's Mind and Time-Bending Neo Noir

Christopher Smith's neo-noir thriller, Detour, should keep audiences guessing until the end

Review: THE SUNSHINE MAKERS, True Believers and the Psychedelic Revolution

They amble more than they walk nowadays. But for a brief period in the late 1960s, they were giants who ruled the world. They took their first acid trips on opposite ends of the United States, Tim Scully in San...

Blu-ray Review: Fassbinder's FOX AND HIS FRIENDS Cuts Just As Deep 40 Years Later

Rainer Wener Fassbinder has always been an artist I've respected by reputation, rather than through a deep knowledge or understanding of his work. In fact, I've only see a handful of Fassbinder films and I will admit to tapping out...

Review: BAD KIDS OF CRESTVIEW ACADEMY

Ben Browder's film Bad Kids of Crestview Academy starts with a bang, with a SWAT-team storming a school. The policemen find mutilated bodies, a crashed Porsche, and a schoolgirl who literally opens fire on them (pun intended: she uses a...

Review: 20TH CENTURY WOMEN Rocks the Roost

You must remember this... Filmmaker Mike Mills remembers a lot of things. His own life is the source material for his films. 2010’s Beginners was about his rough relationship with his father; now, 20th Century Women is about him growing...

Review: PATERSON Charts A Remarkable Journey

A driver named Paterson in a town called Paterson played by a man named Driver - the rhyming seems almost too perfect. Yet Jim Jarmuch's latest, a delicate, poetic, often delightful musing on creativity and the art of listening, is...

Blu-ray Review: PRIVATE PROPERTY, A Gripping Noir Finally Gets Its Due

Leslie Stevens' 1960 film noir Private Property is an incredibly tense psychosexual thriller that is years ahead of its time. Stevens was probably best known as the creator of the influential science fiction TV series The Outer Limits, but before...

Blu-ray Review: BLACK CHRISTMAS Reigns

Canadian director Bob Clark (A Christmas Story, Murder By Decree) tragically left this mortal realm in a car crash in 2007, but his legacy of work lives on. He worked in several genres, but in horror, his 1970s masterpiece Black...

Other Worlds Austin 2016 Review: DOMAIN, Great Visual Style and an Intriguing Puzzle Narrative

An intriguing Twilight Zone premise gives way to a deadly mystery in Nathaniel Atcheson's fascinating new sci-fi indie, Domain, which just had its world premier at the Austin Other Worlds Film Festival.   In the film, more than half a million survivors...

Review: SLASH, an Erotically Tinted Coming-of-Age Tale With a Lot of Heart

Explorative. Confusing. Transformative. Banal. Awkward. Who doesn’t remember his or her teenage years and the various ups and downs that characterize them? Cinematic history is not exactly short on narratives that stage the universal voyage of introspective youngsters who find...

Review: In THE EYES OF MY MOTHER, the Horror Comes From Within

"You're just like your mother!" Depending on your age and circumstances, that can be either complementary or derogatory. For Francisca, it's the story of her life. Strikingly presented in black and white, The Eyes of My Mother (Os Olhos de...

Review: THINGS TO COME, Philosophy Teacher Isabelle Huppert Contemplates the Future

French filmmaker Mia Hansen-Løve, best known for tales of youth Eden and Goodbye First Love, teams up with iconic actress Isabelle Huppert for Things To Come, a quietly affecting story about a bourgeois middle-aged philosophy teacher and the big changes in her life.