Indie Reviews

Sort By
From The
Editors
Everything From
Everyone
Most
Loved
Most
Hated
What The
Hell?!

Review: ARE WE NOT CATS, a Hair-Pulling Winner

Adapted from a short film of the same name, Are We Not Cats is a surprising and bold piece of filmmaking by director Xander Robin. It tells the story of a young man, Eliezer (Michael Patrick Nicholson), who is swiftly...

Review: THE LODGERS, Neo-Gothic Disturbances

The gothic has always been the cornerstone and mainstay of horror film: that place that is supposed to be the most secure and welcoming - one's home - is suddenly dangerous and uninviting. Irish director Brian O'Malley (Let Us Prey)...

Berlinale 2018 Review: UNSANE, A Stellar Piece of Psycho Fiction

Depending on what your thoughts on Logan Lucky were, it was possible to worry that Steven Soderbergh had hit a bit of a bump in the road last year, but fortunately the director of prized titles like Ocean's Eleven, Magic...

Berlinale 2018 Review: INFINITE FOOTBALL, Corneliu Porumboiu Kicks Up A Smile

Corneliu Porumboiu’s Infinite Football (Fotbal infinit) is definitely a film you could watch in its entirety without thinking it’s a documentary. Staying nicely onside of what feels like a deadpan comedy for a delightfully compact seventy minutes in Berlinale’s Panorama...

Blu-ray Review: THE FLORIDA PROJECT, Another Exuberant Celebration of Life on the Fringe From Sean Baker

Director Sean Baker is perhaps the most empathetic filmmaker working today. Two years ago his film Tangerine, famously shot entirely on iPhones, was a runaway critical success. That film, the story of a transgendered prostitute hunting down her philandering boyfriend,...

Berlinale 2018 Review: THE REAL ESTATE, a Devilishly Good Invasion of Personal Space

It's been hard to find something truly worth writing home about since opening night of this year's 68th Berlinale programme, but thankfully Swedish film The Real Estate (Toppen av ingenting) has finally exploded onto the scene. Like a cinematic pipe...

Berlinale 2018 Review: GARBAGE Savagely Attacks Religious Hypocrisy In Media Addicted India

A nation crippled by divisive partisan politics and violent religious and cultural hardliners. A nation in which anyone who doesn't expressly and enthusiastically support the right wing central government is labeled as traitorous and excoriated on twenty four hour partisan...

Berlinale 2018 Review: ISLE OF DOGS, An Obvious Joy By the Masterful Wes Anderson

The 68th Berlinale Film Festival's Main Competition opened in safe hands today, with Wes Anderson's brilliant latest animation Isle of Dogs. Already hotly anticipated by the director's fiercly loyal fans ever since the film's trailer was dropped by Fox Searchlight...

Review: SHINERS Puts a Shine on a Neglected Profession

Opting for nothing less than an examination of the purpose and philosophy of 21st century labour -- in short, how and why do we work in an era of automation and disposable consumerism? -- Stacey Tenenbaum's re-evaluation of the humble...

Review: LOOKING GLASS Reveals More Than Expected

Moving to Arizona and running a motel sounds like such a great idea! Unless, of course, you're Ray (Nicolas Cage), who has a fresh start in mind when he and his wife Maggie (Robin Tunney) assume ownership of a small...

Blu-ray Review: NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD Shines in New 4K Restoration From The Criterion Collection

George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead has been one of The Criterion Collection's worst kept secrets for several years now. Ever since the planned 50th anniversary restoration was announced, horror fans around the world began saving their pennies...

Review: BASMATI BLUES, Brie Larson, Singing Scientist, Goes to India

By the time Donald Sutherland leads a song and dance number, kicking around gliding office furniture and extolling the virtues of capitalistic greed for "The Greater Good" -- which includes the should-be immortal line "Obi-wan Kenobi gave up to Darth...

Sundance 2018 Review: HAL, A Great Director of the 1970s Gets His Due

The so-called “New Hollywood” of the 1970s was driven by a number of filmmakers, many of them film school trained, who broke with many established modes of production and benefited from the opportunities afforded them by the collapse of the...

Sundance 2018 Review: TYREL, An Ambiguous and Uncomfortable Look at Casual Racism

Proving that ostracized characters with odd outlooks on life can be effectively disturbing in any language, Chilean director Sebastián Silva has made a career, in both Spanish and English, out of stories focused on people pushed to the edge –...

Sundance 2018 Review: KUSAMA - INFINITY, Inside the Life, Work, and Mind of a Legendary Artist

Now at the age of 88, legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is currently one of the most popular and successful artists in the world. Her recent New York gallery exhibition, "Yayoi Kusama: Festival of Life" - featuring her signature "Infinity...

Sundance 2018 Review: DAMSEL, A Quick-Witted Feminist Western

Western tropes get punched straight in their often male-driven faces by a heroine in the Zellner Brothers' Damsel, where the protagonist is only in distress when dealing with the pathetically entitled males that cross her path. The fantasy of macho bravado...

Slamdance 2018 Review: MAN ON FIRE, One Man's Ultimate Sacrifice and a Town's Reckoning With Its Racism

On June 23, 2014, a 79-year-old Methodist minister named Charles Moore drove to a nearly deserted shopping center parking lot in his former hometown of Grand Saline, Texas, poured gasoline on himself, and set himself on fire. The note Moore...

Sundance 2018 Review: WE THE ANIMALS Marks the Poetic Battle Cry of Childhood

At it's most visceral and true, Jeremiah Zagar's narrative feature debut is about the breath, blood and life of a child artist who is beginning to hone their passion in order to understand and survive, yes, but then also to heal, to grow, and to share.

Sundance 2018 Review: MADELINE'S MADELINE Dances in the Delight and Dread of the Feminine Intuitive

Madeline's Madeline is what we mean when we talk about authentic cinema; pure cinema, brimming over with euphoria and empathy and a direct perspective of a human, both inside and out, mental and physical, that feels so complete as to be dizzying. revelatory

Review: LIKE ME, Social Media Madness

The horrors of our contemporary society are plentiful and genre films have always excelled at probing our cultural fears and discomforts. In Robert Mockler’s debut film, the paradox of the digital media age, which allows us to connect with everyone...