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Review: In THE EYES OF MY MOTHER, the Horror Comes From Within

"You're just like your mother!" Depending on your age and circumstances, that can be either complementary or derogatory. For Francisca, it's the story of her life. Strikingly presented in black and white, The Eyes of My Mother (Os Olhos de...

Review: THINGS TO COME, Philosophy Teacher Isabelle Huppert Contemplates the Future

French filmmaker Mia Hansen-Løve, best known for tales of youth Eden and Goodbye First Love, teams up with iconic actress Isabelle Huppert for Things To Come, a quietly affecting story about a bourgeois middle-aged philosophy teacher and the big changes in her life.

Review: GOODNIGHT BROOKLYN - THE STORY OF DEATH BY AUDIO, Living, Breathing, Fiery Passion

A bittersweet memoir of a independent music venue that proved to be much more than a place for bands to play their music as loudly as possible, Goodnight Brookyn - The Story of Death By Audio is also a screed...

Review: PET, A Man, A Woman, and a Cage

A woman is locked in a cage by a man who wants to change her. That's both a metaphor for too many modern relationships and the premise of a new film by director Carles Torrens (Apartment 143). Seth (Dominic Monaghan),...

Review: MIFUNE: THE LAST SAMURAI Pays Tribute to an Electrifying Actor

Undeniably the most recognizable and prominent actor in the history of Japanese cinema, Mifune Toshiro has not only influenced generations of young performers, who passionately aspire to follow in his footsteps even nowadays, but also forever changed the perception of...

Review: ALWAYS SHINE, an Intensely Personal and Satisfying Genre Picture

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny...

Review: MANCHESTER BY THE SEA, Lonergan's Latest is Earnest if Predictable

The structural adventurousness of Kenneth Lonergan's film about an emotionally numb man learning to open his heart to others again is admirable. But we're too busy wading through the narrative thickets to entirely access the raw beating heart at its core.

Black Nights 2016 Review: PORTO, Love Does Not Conquer All

Call me a cynic, but I've always been skeptical of anyone who's in the first few months of dating who says that they and their partner were 'meant to be together' (maybe because at least half of those relationships end...

Black Nights 2016 Review: THE WHITE KING, Dystopia Through A Child's Eyes

Dystopian film and literature has taken a turn from science fiction to possible current affairs, in our recent political climate. With the rise of right-wing political ideology and right-wing political control of influential countries, these stories are more important than...

Review: In NOCTURNAL ANIMALS, Bad Things Happen

For the engaged cinephile, right from the opening credit sequence of Nocturnal Animals, there will be a sense of confidence that things here are in good hands. Hyper-glossy and daringly uncommercial in the same breath, it puts some fine Lynchian...

Black Nights 2016 Review: Steven Cantor's DANCER Dazzles, But Risks Falling Short

Director Steven Cantor turns his attention to ballet prodigy Sergei Polunin in his latest documentary, Dancer. Having already taken the stage at the 60th BFI London Film Festival, and now returning for an encore at Tallinn's Doc@POFF strand, this feature-length...

Black Nights 2016 Review: THE LAND OF THE ENLIGHTENED Enchants With Its Docu-drama Blend

If there's one thing everybody needs to know about, it's Tallin Black Nights (or PÖFF as it is rather fantastically named in Estonian). Having gained A-list status back in 2014, it's now officially one of the top fifteen film festivals...

Morbido Fest 2016 Review: ARE WE NOT CATS Purrs

I didn't get to see as many films as I would have liked to at Morbido 2016, but Are We Not Cats was one of them. I'm glad to have seen this surprising and bold piece of filmmaking. Directed by...

Review: Watch Out, THE MONSTER Hides Under The Drama

It's been a while since Bryan Bertino's invasion thriller The Strangers premiered. It was a film which wrung a lot of tension from a simple premise, helped by strong acting from its terrorized lead actors. The same can be said...

Blu-ray Review: Severin Films' BURIAL GROUND, the Definitive Look at a Gut-Munching Gore Feast

If you're a Burial Ground fan, this is definitely the disc to own. Great image quality and comprehensive bonus materials make this an easy recommendation.

Review: CRD, An Ethereal Exercise In Art Vs. Artifice

CRD is one hell of a feature from director Kranti Kanade. The film utilizes more film techniques in its 100 minutes than most directors do in an entire career.

Trieste 2016 Review: BLIND SUN, The Slow Burning of Madness

Joyce A. Nashawati's debut feature Blind Sun has been making the rounds of festivals for a year, so I was surprised to discover it had yet to be reviewed on Screen Anarchy. I was also quite pleased, as it was...

Review: DOG EAT DOG Doesn't Give A Shit What You (Or I) Think

The press notes for Paul Schrader's grotesque, and let's face it, kind of loopy, story of disorganized crime offer a mission statement for its own unusual blend of zero budget and A-list talent: "The freedom not to be boring." This...

Review: HACKSAW RIDGE, A Pacifist in Mel Gibson's War

The true-life story of Desmond T. Doss comes vividly to life in Hacksaw Ridge, a biographical picture directed by Mel Gibson that features a soulful performance by Andrew Garfield. Solid and stirring -- and very respectful -- the movie begins...

Review: TOWER, Strikingly Told and Sadly Relevant

On a hot summer day in 1966, multiple shots rang out and a body fell down. Within moments, a teenager was dead and his pregnant girlfriend lay bleeding by his side. That was only the beginning of a horrifying 90...