Hollywood Reviews

Sort By
From The
Editors
Everything From
Everyone
Most
Loved
Most
Hated
What The
Hell?!

Review: In ATOMIC BLONDE, Charlize Theron Breaks the Glass Ceiling By Punching Through the Berlin Wall

I love a good espionage thriller, and what better setting than the fifty year Cold War between the Western democracies and their deadly enemies in the Communist East? This underground conflict has bred some of the most magnificent films of...

Review: DUNKIRK, Nolan Styles Overwrought War Epic

After a slew of tired franchise entries and superhero tentpoles, the summer finally delivers a truly essential big screen experience. Austere and nerve-racking, Christopher Nolan's Dunkirk is a bold big-screen gamble that employs an experimental structure and little in the...

Review: SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING Comes Home in Fun Style

When is an origin story not an origin story? When super-producer Kevin Feige and his brigade of talent behind the unyielding success of the Marvel Cinematic Universe took the creative reins of Sony's third go at Spider-Man in 15 years,...

Now on Blu-ray: POWER RANGERS Makes For A Mediocre Film, But A Great Disc

When it was announced that the Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers was getting a reboot for the cinema, a large portion of geek community let out a collective groan. I was never a big fan of MMPR back in the day,...

Review: BABY DRIVER, Top-Notch Action Mixed With Sheer Fun

Voom voom voom! So begins Edgar Wright's Baby Driver, which finds Ansel Elgort behind the wheel as a getaway driver, rocking out to a song blasting from the buds planted in his ears. In the privacy of his own space,...

Review: WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES Threatens Extinction, While Holding Out a Sliver of Hope

Foiling low-bar expectations, War for the Planet of the Apes takes advantage of its built-in name recognition to create a gloomy, tense atmosphere in which nothing is guaranteed and anything is possible. Strangely enough, the film reminds me of director...

Review: THE BEGUILED, Sofia Coppola's Gorgeous and Campy Romp

Sofia Coppola is a filmmaker whose work I've appreciated from a distance. I know she's a great director, but apart from Marie Antoinette, her stories of rich white people and their troubles has held little interest for me. But as...

Review: ONCE UPON A TIME IN VENICE Makes You Remember Other Times

Today marks the release of a new action comedy with Bruce Willis, and a curious thing it is. Once Upon a Time in Venice sports a truly incredible cast, who are then placed as cartoon characters in a shallow pastiche...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Explores Clowes and Zwigoff's GHOST WORLD

It’s often difficult to review Criterion releases, because it tends to involve putting into words your feelings about your ‘favorite movie’. This term, when spoken by me, doesn’t hold much weight among my friends, more so, groans and eye rolls...

Review: CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS: THE FIRST EPIC MOVIE Doesn't Stink

Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie, as fun as it is and wants to be, is an all-too-obvious case of "the emperor has no clothes." Or in this case, “the super-hero has quite limited clothes”. Perhaps he left them in...

Review: WONDER WOMAN Is The Superhero Movie We All Need Right Now

At a time when men in certain circles feel compelled and emboldened to weaponise their fragility in the face of advancing feminism, the world needs a hero like Wonder Woman more than ever. Created more than 75 years ago, and...

Cannes 2017 Review: THE BEGUILED, A Campy Anatomy of Lust

Sofia Coppola is a filmmaker whose work I've appreciated from a distance. I know she's a great director, but apart from Marie Antoinette, her stories of rich white people and their troubles has held little interest for me. But as...

Review: TWIN PEAKS: THE RETURN, First 4 Episodes Dazzle, Confound, Delight

Gorgeous to behold and wonderfully idiosyncratic, Twin Peaks: The Return is nothing like I expected and everything I wanted. The first four episodes were unveiled last night on the Showtime premium network in the U.S. As I recently explained, I...

Review: Guy Ritchie's KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD, Very, Very Familiar

There are countless films about the legend of King Arthur, from a Disney animation (The Sword in the Stone) to a hilarious satire (Monty Python and the Holy Grail) to a romance with Richard Gere (First Knight) to the epic...

Review: ALIEN: COVENANT Uses Horror to Mask Its Shortcomings

Ridley Scott returns to fill in the blanks of the maligned horrors of space, with plenty of screaming and more than enough people around to hear it in Alien: Covenant. His familiar fated take on the Alien genesis, however, sticks more...

Blu-ray Review: JEANNE DIELMAN, Criterion's Three-Hour Slog To Pure Cinematic Perfection

Chantal Akerman's Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai Du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles was released by the Criterion Collection a few years ago in a standard-definition DVD, but gets upgraded to Blu-ray this week, which finally gave me the chance to catch up...

Review: LOWRIDERS, Battling for the Soul of an Artist

Self-righteous certitude, seething resentment, and taciturn parental authority collide repeatedly in Lowriders, an exploration of a nuclear family and Mexican-American culture. Directed with conviction by Ricardo de Montreuil and bathed in amber by cinematographer Andrés Sánchez, the film is similar...

Review: GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY Vol. 2 Goes For Emotional Beats

When Marvel created their plan for a cinematic universe, they had to take the risk of making several stand-alone films which, by themselves, didn't have all that much of a business case. We're talking about Captain America: The First Avenger...

Tribeca 2017 Review: THE CIRCLE, Where All Are Trapped in the Social Media Web

The subject of our hyper-connected, social media-based cultural landscape is a fruitful and relevant one for filmmakers, and one with great potential for mass audience interest, given how pervasive this is in our daily lives. David Fincher’s Facebook origin story The Social Network can be looked upon as the gold...

Blu-ray Review: RUMBLE FISH, Innocence Dies A Lonely Death In Tulsa

As much as I love movies, and that is a lot or I wouldn't be here, there are certain things that turn me off almost immediately. Francis Ford Coppola's Rumble Fish, a kind of response to the populist storytelling of...