Review: KATE PLAYS CHRISTINE, A Fascinating, RASHOMON-Style Meta Investigation

Christine Chubbuck, a news reporter in Sarasota, Florida, killed herself in an apparent suicide on live television in 1974. Because it took It place way before the internet age, and the only existing original videotape of the actual incident is...

Interview: Uncertainty Principle - Robert Greene on KATE PLAYS CHRISTINE

I first encountered Robert Greene's inventive and daring filmmaking at the Art of the Real film series in 2013. Actress, his film starring Brandy Burre playing herself in a documentary-style portrayal of an aging actress in upstate New York, was...

Review: Werner Herzog's LO AND BEHOLD, REVERIES OF THE CONNECTED WORLD, A Wry, Meditative Masterpiece About the Internet

A weak internet signal at my job caused massive delays in our daily operation the last couple of days, making us bang our heads against the table in sheer panic mode. This is where the internet got us: We are...

Review: NEITHER HEAVEN NOR EARTH, An Unusual, Effective Metaphysical Thriller Set In Afghanistan

Neither Heaven Nor Earth is an effective, minimalistic metaphysical thriller set in a battlefield of Afghanistan from a French visual artist/filmmaker, Clément Cogitore, in his feature film debut. It tells about French soldiers stationed in the Wakhan valley, an arid,...

Review: HIERONYMUS BOSCH: TOUCHED BY THE DEVIL, A Fascinating Look at Dutch Master's Dark Imagination

To mark the 500th year of his death, Hieronymus Bosch: Touched by the Devil follows a team of Dutch Bosch scholars and experts, headed by art historian Matthijs Ilsink, as they try to shore up existing paintings by the Dutch...

Melbourne 2016: ScreenAnarchy Does MIFF

Celebrating its 65th edition, the Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) has revealed its full program. With the festival now less than a week away, let's take a look at the highlights, some personal recommendations, and ScreenAnarchy reviewed gems from festivals...

Review: THE CHILDHOOD OF A LEADER, Making of a Monster in Brady Corbet's Accomplished Directorial Debut

An allegorical tale set in the shadow of WWI Europe, The Childhood of a Leader is a very accomplished first feature from 27 year-old American actor Brady Corbet. Considering his face has been showing up in the films of who's...

Preview: Japan Cuts 2016, As Dynamic as Ever

Japan Cuts, Japan Society's annual festival of contemporary Japanese cinema, turns 10 this year. What the value of a film festival is may seem easy to talk about in terms of age and program focus. It  can also be hard...

Master Filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami, 1940 - 2016

Abbas Kiarostami, an Iranian master filmmaker, passed away from gastrointestinal cancer in Paris today. As an avid fan of his humanistic, genre transcending films, I can say with a certain conviction that we've lost one of the greatest artists in...

ScreenAnarchy's Top Movies Of The First Half Of 2016

One year ago, we arrived at the mid-year point in high spirits. We all marveled at the new Mad Max, got turned Inside Out by Pixar, and were seduced by Ex Machina. So we published our favorites as a nice...

Preview: New York Asian Film Festival Celebrates 15 Gonzo Years

Picture it: The early part of the 21st Century. Dial-up modems sing shrilly throughout our homes. Bush & Cheney plot and scheme like Batman villains. A young Canadian music and movie enthusiast starts a website to talk about the stuff...

Review: In TIKKUN, Israeli Director Avishai Sivan Creates An Atmospheric Netherworld

Shot beautifully in black and white, Israeli artist and filmmaker Avishai Sivan's Tikkun tells a story about a young orthodox Jewish man, embodied astonishingly here by first time actor Aharon Traitel, slowly losing his faith after a near-death experience. With...

Interview: Israeli Director Avishai Sivan Talks TIKKUN

Set in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Jerusalem, Tikkun gives a unique glimpse into a highly reclusive world where tradition and religion dominate private lives. With its haunting imagery and thought provoking subject matter, Tikkun left me a lasting impression...

Review: KAILI BLUES, The Most Impressive Debut In Years

A country doctor's search for his nephew becomes an unforgettable existential road trip in Kaili Blues, directed by a 26-year old Chinese filmmaker, Bi Gan. It's an ambitious, mesmerizing film that you'd never think it is the work of a first...

NYC Happenings: Katra Film Series, A Monthly Short Film Showcase From Around The World

New York's definintely not short on film events, but Katra Film Series deserves a special mention because it serves as a showcase specifically for carefully curated short films by emerging artists from all over the world. Katra, a Mediteranean themed...

Review: SUNSET SONG, An Impeccable Masterpiece From Director Terence Davies

A sweeping tale of changing times in Scotland in the early 20th century, Terence Davies's new film Sunset Song centers around a farm girl Chris Guthrie (Agyness Deyn) in the fictional rural town of Kinraddie near Aberdeen. Chris is a thoroughly...

Interview: Terence Davies Talks SUNSET SONG, A QUIET PASSION, Women Protagonists, Poetry And Digital Filmmaking

Terence Davies, regarded as one of the greatest living British directors, doesn't make films too often. So when he does, it's a monumental event every time. With his long delayed passion project Sunset Song finally coming out in theaters this...

NYC Happenings: New York African Film Festival Celebrates Its 23rd Year!

Once again, highlighting the continent's best and the brightest, New York African Film Festival will present 25 feature-length films and 27 short films from 26 countries, bringing another thrilling and multifaceted selection of African films from the continent and the...

The Many Faces Of Chris Cooper

Among the fine films opening wide this week in North America is Jean-Marc Vallée's Demolition, which knocked out Jason Gorber (his words). It sure has a stellar cast, including Jake Gyllenhaal, Naomi Watts and Chris Cooper. We could have picked...

Preview: Art Of The Real Continues To Be The Most Thrilling Film Series For Serious Cinephiles

Art of the Real, a film series showcasing nonfiction work from around the world, remains and continues to be the most essential film event for serious and adventurous cinephiles. Once again, curated by venerable Dennis Lim and Racheal Rakes, FSLC...