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Berlinale 2018 Review: THE INTERPRETER, Two Oldtimers in a Road Dramedy

Peter Simonischek of Toni Erdmann fame meets Oscar-winning director Jiří Menzel in a dramedy by Slovak director Martin Šulík

Rotterdam 2018 Review: THE DEATH OF STALIN Makes You Laugh At A Corrupt Tragedy

We're big fans of Scottish writer/director Armando Iannucci here at Screen Anarchy, and have been ever since he was doing short comedic skits on the BBC. The man is now of course most famous for his series Veep, The Thick...

Review: ZOMBIOLOGY: ENJOY YOURSELF TONIGHT, Comic Sympathy for the Living Dead

Run for your lives: zombies are coming! But first, meet the leading players! Zombiology: Enjoy Yourself Tonight (originally titled Gam man da song si) plays more like a warm-hearted relationship melodrama than a zombie thriller. That's a good thing, though....

Review: NOVEMBER, Just the Right Amount of Weird

Thomas Hobbes' famous saying that the life of man is "solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short" could have been the mantra for the life of the characters in Rainer Sarnet's November. Luckily, the film itself is fantastical, strange, beautifully shot,...

Review: ARE WE NOT CATS, a Hair-Pulling Winner

Adapted from a short film of the same name, Are We Not Cats is a surprising and bold piece of filmmaking by director Xander Robin. It tells the story of a young man, Eliezer (Michael Patrick Nicholson), who is swiftly...

Berlinale 2018 Review: MUSEO, Another Gem of Charming Fecklessness By Alonso Ruizpalacios

Having won the Best First Feature Award with his exquisite debut Güeros at the Berlinale in 2014, director Alonso Ruizpalacios now excitingly returns to the festival's Main Competition with Museo (Museum). This sophomore effort feels much larger in scale, and it...

Rotterdam 2018 Review: THE HEART, a Trendy Millennial Drama Celebrating Female Sexuality and Independence

The heart wants what it wants, but does not get – this is the premise of Swedish actress-director Fanni Metelius’s debut The Heart (Hjartat), about a young photographer Mika and her musician boyfriend Tesfay who are madly in love, yet...

Review: THE LODGERS, Neo-Gothic Disturbances

The gothic has always been the cornerstone and mainstay of horror film: that place that is supposed to be the most secure and welcoming - one's home - is suddenly dangerous and uninviting. Irish director Brian O'Malley (Let Us Prey)...

Berlinale 2018 Review: UNSANE, A Stellar Piece of Psycho Fiction

Depending on what your thoughts on Logan Lucky were, it was possible to worry that Steven Soderbergh had hit a bit of a bump in the road last year, but fortunately the director of prized titles like Ocean's Eleven, Magic...

Review: ANNIHILATION, a Rainbow Hell of Genre Splicing

About ten years ago, I found myself musing about speculative fiction novels ripe for adaptation to the big screen. The subject of The New Weird literary movement came up via Alastair Reynold's Chasm City and China Mieville's Perdido St. Station, arguably the pinnacle of...

Berlinale 2018 Review: FAKE TATTOOS, Bearing the Marks of a Great Teenage Drama

Whilst not Pascal Plante's first feature film, having previously made doc La génération porn in 2014, Fake Tattoos (Les faux tatouages) is the director's first step into feature-length drama. And it's quite the first step - one that definitely carries...

Blu-ray Review: In AN ACTOR'S REVENGE, a Female Impersonator Walks Home Alone At Night

Made right in the middle of the most fertile period in the career of director Kon Ichikawa (The Burmese Harp, Tokyo Olympiad), An Actor's Revenge joins the Criterion Collection this week as spine #912. It's a drab tale of melodrama...

Berlinale 2018 Review: INFINITE FOOTBALL, Corneliu Porumboiu Kicks Up A Smile

Corneliu Porumboiu’s Infinite Football (Fotbal infinit) is definitely a film you could watch in its entirety without thinking it’s a documentary. Staying nicely onside of what feels like a deadpan comedy for a delightfully compact seventy minutes in Berlinale’s Panorama...

Rotterdam 2018 Review: THE REPORTS ON SARAH AND SALEEM Marries Arthouse Drama to Genre Audience Allure Without Losing Complexity

Muayad Alayan´s sophomore feature The Reports on Sarah and Saleem infuses genre sensibilities into arthouse drama against the backdrop of a political conflict

Blu-ray Review: THE FLORIDA PROJECT, Another Exuberant Celebration of Life on the Fringe From Sean Baker

Director Sean Baker is perhaps the most empathetic filmmaker working today. Two years ago his film Tangerine, famously shot entirely on iPhones, was a runaway critical success. That film, the story of a transgendered prostitute hunting down her philandering boyfriend,...

Berlinale 2018 Review: THE INVISIBLE HANDS, An Unlikely Meeting of Cultures Yields Strange and Beautiful Results

The Invisible Hands, an excellent documentary by Marina Gioti and Georges Salameh, explores the unlikely collaboration between American musical provocateur Alan Bishop and a group of young Egyptian musicians whose lives were upended by the Arab Spring. The film's international...

Berlinale 2018 Review: THE REAL ESTATE, a Devilishly Good Invasion of Personal Space

It's been hard to find something truly worth writing home about since opening night of this year's 68th Berlinale programme, but thankfully Swedish film The Real Estate (Toppen av ingenting) has finally exploded onto the scene. Like a cinematic pipe...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's ELEVATOR TO THE GALLOWS a Top Story, by Miles

The great Jeanne Moreau died July 31, 2017. She was an undisputed titan of World Cinema, a deep and dour, alive yet melancholy presence, ever unmistakable. Always elevating. I say this here and now because I couldn’t at the time....

Berlinale 2018 Review: GARBAGE Savagely Attacks Religious Hypocrisy In Media Addicted India

A nation crippled by divisive partisan politics and violent religious and cultural hardliners. A nation in which anyone who doesn't expressly and enthusiastically support the right wing central government is labeled as traitorous and excoriated on twenty four hour partisan...

Review: MONSTER HUNT 2, Tony Leung and Wuba for the Win

Wuba, the radish-shaped heir to the monster throne, is in trouble again, but this time Tony Leung Chiu Wai is on hand to protect him in Raman Hui’s big budget sequel, Monster Hunt 2. Bai Baihe and Jing Boran reprise...