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Udine 2018 Review: LITTLE FOREST Will Have You Yearning for the Simple Life

In Korean cinema, when characters retreat to the countryside things generally don't work out too well for them, but in Yim Soon-rye's new drama Little Forest, a young woman regains her spirit, and as she does so, many viewers will...

Review: SWATHANTHRYAM ARDHARATHRIYIL Is A Stylish SHAWSHANK In South India

Whatever is in the water in Kerala these days, I've gotta get some for myself. India's newest hot spot for thrilling filmmakers is churning out new and exciting films all the time, and the latest thriller to hit cinema screens...

Review: BIG FISH & BEGONIA, Chinese Animation Dazzles in Sumptuous and Mystical Feature

Hailed as the Chinese answer to the fantastical works of beloved Japanese animation house, Studio Ghibli, the independently produced feature Big Fish & Begonia channels ancient wisdom into a dazzling animated canvas. Enhancing the overall production value of the film,...

Review: RELICTO, Argentine Mystery Horror an Experimental Ode to Artistic Influences

Oscar and Tamara leave the big city to settle into a small home in the country. It is an attempt by Oscar to rebuild their broken relationship after the death of his wife and her mother. Not long after they...

Review: THE 4TH COMPANY, Prison Football As Coverup Of A Criminal System

The 4th Company (La 4ª Compañía) gained attention last year when it won several Ariel awards (the Mexican equivalent of the Academy Awards), including Best Picture; it was particularly notorious because practically no one had seen the film at that...

Review: THE FENCER, History Crosses Swords at School

Endel is hiding. In The Fencer (Miekkailija), which has recently been issued as a fine-looking DVD from Music Box Films and is also available to watch via various VOD platforms, Endel Nelis (Mart Avandi) has returned to his Estonian homeland...

Review: ZAMA, Lost in the Heart of Darkness

Lucrecia Martel suggested in her introduction to the sold-out screening of her much anticipated follow-up to Headless Woman that the audience might want to take in Zama like a whiskey. Indeed, it's a heady, at times bitter, at times sweet...

Review: THE RIDER, Dealing Gently With Thwarted Dreams

Chloé Zhao's first feature film, Songs My Brothers Taught Me, showed the beautiful and difficult life of a young man on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota; his relationship with his family, his clashes with white men, and...

Indian Film Fest LA 2018 Review: MERCURY, Karthik Subbaraj's Silent Thriller Turns Up The Heat

Mercury, the latest film from Tamil wunderkind director, Karthik Subbaraj, is a bold experiment in alternative storytelling. This film, touted as a “silent thriller” though really more of a ‘dialogue-free’ one, is the most high profile project of its kind...

Review: Netflix's LOST IN SPACE

In the future the Robinson family is part of the twenty-fourth colonial fleet, on their way to Alpha Centauri to make a new life for themselves. But disaster strikes the mother ship, the Resolute, and the Robinsons find themselves at...

Review: MARROWBONE, Hidden Secrets and Sibling Attachment

Sergio G. Sánchez is best known as co-writer of The Orphanage, certainly one of the best horror films of recent years, with its gothic setting, and themes of past traumas haunting the present. In his feature directorial debut, he returns...

Review: RAMPAGE Delivers The Monster Mayhem We Deserve

Rampage just might be the most entertaining video game adaptation ever made. It might have something to do with the fact that there is so little meat on the bones of the original property that writers Ryan Engle, Carlton Cuse...

Review: With JEANNETTE: THE CHILDHOOD OF JOAN OF ARC, Bruno Dumont Charts Yet Another Territory

Jeannette is a real gamble of a film. In theory, with everything Dumont is striving for, spiritually and artistically, it should satisfy fans of his work. But intellectually understanding what he is up to and enjoying the actual piece are two different things.

Indian Film Fest LA 2018 Review: TAKE OFF Is A Remarkable Testament The The Potential Of Indian Mainstream Cinema

In 2014, 46 Indian nurses were rescued from an ISIS controlled region of Iraq. Director Mahesh Narayan's 2017 feature, Take Off, is based on their story, and it became one of the biggest commerical and critical successes of last year...

Review: LEAN ON PETE, Racing to Rock Bottom

If you’re a big fan of dramas like myself, then a review with the words “Andrew Haigh” plus “greatest tragedy” might well make you think that you’re onto a winner. Unfortunately, Lean on Pete isn’t the Andrew Haigh entry into...

Review: YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE, Palpable Tragedy Brought to Wrenching Life

Lynne Ramsay's last two films (Morvern Callar, We Need to Talk About Kevin) have focused on individuals (in these cases, women,) who must contend with being the odd-person-out, someone with a secret they fear so dark and disturbing that it...

Review: LOWLIFE, Splashing Absurdity With Confidence

As a snappily dressed Luchador intensely monologues his desires and legacy to the camera, we are unsure of exactly who his audience is, and the movie withholds the answer to maxim effect. A dirty Immigrations Officer and a scuzzy surgeon...

Review: THE ENDLESS, Fantastical, Intimate and Personal Horror

Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead's work has always been (at least in part) about intimacy and trust; particularly the intimacy of close relationships, and how problems manifest; and in the case of their films, they often manifest in the form...

Review: A QUIET PLACE, ... ! ... ? ... ?! ... ! .... !! ..... !!! ... !!!!!

Imagine a world that has been silenced by mysterious creatures. The deadly threat inherent in the premise is riveted home in an opening sequence that immediately sets the neat and efficient A Quiet Place apart from other neat and efficient...

Blu-ray Review: BEHIND THE MASK Remains Great

More often than not, a film won't get the acclaim that it should, even if it builds a fan base. Such is the case with Behind The Mask: The Rise Of Leslie Vernon. Like Scream in the sense that it's a meta...