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Review: MISS SLOANE Wallows in Politic as Usual

It wouldn't hurt to bone up on Washington DC lobby laws and practices before taking in Miss Sloane, the latest from one-time prestige director John Madden (Shakespeare in Love). But if doing so falls between the cracks, don't let that...

Review: LA LA LAND, a Captivating Treasure

La La Land is a series of dichotomies, existing as both a delightful flight of fancy and a broad relationship drama. It’s a film oozing with both nostalgia and contemporary energy, feeling both classic and of the moment in the...

Other Worlds Austin 2016 Review: DOMAIN, Great Visual Style and an Intriguing Puzzle Narrative

An intriguing Twilight Zone premise gives way to a deadly mystery in Nathaniel Atcheson's fascinating new sci-fi indie, Domain, which just had its world premier at the Austin Other Worlds Film Festival.   In the film, more than half a million survivors...

Blu-ray Review: DREAMSCAPE Rocks

In 1984, a weird film called Dreamscape hit theaters. Starring Dennis Quaid as Alex Gardner and Kate Capshaw as Jane DeVries, this film is about a man with extraordinary powers of the mind. He's reluctantly brought in to assist on a...

Review: SLASH, an Erotically Tinted Coming-of-Age Tale With a Lot of Heart

Explorative. Confusing. Transformative. Banal. Awkward. Who doesn’t remember his or her teenage years and the various ups and downs that characterize them? Cinematic history is not exactly short on narratives that stage the universal voyage of introspective youngsters who find...

South Asian 2016 Review: MAROON, A Tale of a Man Trapped With His Worst Fears

In Maroon, veteran character actor Manav Kaul plays an associate college professor whose wife goes missing, and it's not too long before his sanity goes along with her. Manav Kaul plays Saurabh, an associate professor of literature at a liberal...

Blu-ray Review: LONE WOLF AND CUB, Feel-Good Family Films For All

If I have another son, I'm going to name him Daigoro. In 1972, producer Katsu Shintaro (Zatoichi, Hanzo the Razor), director Misumi Kenji (also a veteran of the Zatoichi and Hanzo series), manga artist Koike Kazuo, and lead actor Wakayama...

Review: JACKIE, A Sublime And Intimate Look At An American Tragedy

Star-driven biopics are a dime a dozen in the annual awards race yet Pablo Larrain's searing new drama Jackie stands head and shoulders above the more conventional fare that flood theaters around this time of year. A deeply intimate story...

Review: In THE EYES OF MY MOTHER, the Horror Comes From Within

"You're just like your mother!" Depending on your age and circumstances, that can be either complementary or derogatory. For Francisca, it's the story of her life. Strikingly presented in black and white, The Eyes of My Mother (Os Olhos de...

Review: THINGS TO COME, Philosophy Teacher Isabelle Huppert Contemplates the Future

French filmmaker Mia Hansen-Løve, best known for tales of youth Eden and Goodbye First Love, teams up with iconic actress Isabelle Huppert for Things To Come, a quietly affecting story about a bourgeois middle-aged philosophy teacher and the big changes in her life.

Review: GOODNIGHT BROOKLYN - THE STORY OF DEATH BY AUDIO, Living, Breathing, Fiery Passion

A bittersweet memoir of a independent music venue that proved to be much more than a place for bands to play their music as loudly as possible, Goodnight Brookyn - The Story of Death By Audio is also a screed...

Review: PET, A Man, A Woman, and a Cage

A woman is locked in a cage by a man who wants to change her. That's both a metaphor for too many modern relationships and the premise of a new film by director Carles Torrens (Apartment 143). Seth (Dominic Monaghan),...

Review: SWORD MASTER Honours Wuxia Tradition Through Bold Reinvention

Nearly 40 years after Chor Yuen launched his acting career in the Shaw Brothers classic Death Duel, director Derek Yee returns to Gu Long’s source novel for a ravishing new adaptation. With Tsui Hark producing and action choreography from Yuen...

Review: OLD STONE, A Riveting Thriller Where A Good Man Goes Bad

Old Stone develops into a riveting thriller and asks weighty questions about the cost of doing right in an unempathetic society where people rather kill the accident victims off by running over them again rather than saving them. It's a raw and tough first film. And it signals a emergence of a major storyteller.

London Korean 2016 Review: DONGJU, THE PORTRAIT OF A POET Offers Sober and Compelling Look at Modern Korean History

During the last year, the floodgates have opened for the Japanese Occupation Period in mainstream Korean cinema, yet The King and the Clown (2005) helmer Lee Joon-ik, arguably Korea's top purveyor of commercial period fare, has opted to tackle the...

Review: MIFUNE: THE LAST SAMURAI Pays Tribute to an Electrifying Actor

Undeniably the most recognizable and prominent actor in the history of Japanese cinema, Mifune Toshiro has not only influenced generations of young performers, who passionately aspire to follow in his footsteps even nowadays, but also forever changed the perception of...

Review: EVOLUTION, a Strange, Unsettling Tale of Body Horror

I'm a great believer in minimalism, particularly when it comes to body horror in film. Used carefully and deliberately, a few choice scenes can have far more weight in a story and a far more effective impact on the audience. ...

Review: ALWAYS SHINE, an Intensely Personal and Satisfying Genre Picture

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny...

Review: NOEM MY SKOLLIE, South Africa's Deserving Oscar Submission

Noem My Skollie (Call Me Thief) is Daryn Joshua's emphatic debut and Dann-jacques Mouton's breakout performance, but the heart of this year's South African Oscar submission belongs to its writer, John Fredericks, on whose life growing up in the townships...

Black Nights 2016 Review: HOUSE OF OTHERS, The Ghosts of War

Sometimes ghosts are visible, sometimes invisible, and sometimes 'ghosts' are the emptiness, the palpable void left behind. And the latter can be the most frightening and sad of all. In Russudan Gluridze's feature film House of Others, the ghosts are...