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Now on Blu-ray: ALL THE COLOURS OF THE DARK Shines In HD From Shameless Films

Jane is a tragedy magnet. Plagued by the murder of her mother in her childhood and the recent loss of her unborn child in a car accident, Jane is beset by trippy nightmares that seem to foretell her own impending...

Now on Blu-ray: POWER RANGERS Makes For A Mediocre Film, But A Great Disc

When it was announced that the Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers was getting a reboot for the cinema, a large portion of geek community let out a collective groan. I was never a big fan of MMPR back in the day,...

Review: BABY DRIVER, Top-Notch Action Mixed With Sheer Fun

Voom voom voom! So begins Edgar Wright's Baby Driver, which finds Ansel Elgort behind the wheel as a getaway driver, rocking out to a song blasting from the buds planted in his ears. In the privacy of his own space,...

Toronto Japanese Fest 2017 Review: IN THIS CORNER OF THE WORLD

A young girl named Suzu who, in 1944, moves from neighbouring Hiroshima to the port city of Kure, the largest military base for the Imperial Navy and home to ships like the Yamamoto. She moves there to marry Shūsaku, a...

Review: HICKOK Is Just A Brief Chapter Of Wild Bill's Life

James Butler Hickok, better known as Wild Bill, was one of the heroes of the American Old West; a figure who has attained a near-mythical status and whose exploits – some real, some imagined – are prime material for the...

Review: THE REAGAN SHOW Illustrates a Two-Way Relationship Between the Media and the President

It is very important to remember that even Reagan, a highly divisive figure, was regularly grilled by the people who are now regarded as partisan hacks. It didn't used to be that way. There were mutual respect. The film is a good reminder of that.

Review: WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES Threatens Extinction, While Holding Out a Sliver of Hope

Foiling low-bar expectations, War for the Planet of the Apes takes advantage of its built-in name recognition to create a gloomy, tense atmosphere in which nothing is guaranteed and anything is possible. Strangely enough, the film reminds me of director...

Toronto Japanese Fest 2017 Review: HER LOVE BOILS BATHWATER

Futaba (Miyazawa Rie), a strict, but caring single mother, has an awakening when she is told she has an aggressive and terminal cancer that cannot be treated. With only a few months left to live she sets out to reconcile...

Review: THE BIG SICK Skillfully Tackles Weighty Themes With a Light Comic Touch

Whenever The Simpsons offered moments of unexpectedly touching sweetness, the writers would refer to these moments as "Jimmys", as in, showrunner James L. Brooks, who enjoyed providing the family with bouts of humanity. Walking the line of comedy and drama...

Review: THE BEGUILED, Sofia Coppola's Gorgeous and Campy Romp

Sofia Coppola is a filmmaker whose work I've appreciated from a distance. I know she's a great director, but apart from Marie Antoinette, her stories of rich white people and their troubles has held little interest for me. But as...

Review: THE BAD BATCH, Left Behind by the American Dream

Real credit where it’s due, Ana Lily Amirpour’s self-confessed "Iranian Vampire Spaghetti Western" A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night must have been a hell of a tough act to follow, so props to Amirpour for pulling it off in...

Review: Bertrand Tavernier's MY JOURNEY THROUGH FRENCH CINEMA Proves to Be an Invaluable Resource Guide

Obviously My Journey Through French Cinema is a lot to take in one sitting. It's also a goldmine for any cinephiles as an invaluable resource guide. Tavernier is doing us a great service here through his experience as a cinephile and a filmmaker. I am eager to check out more films that are featured in this documentary for years to come.

Review: THE ORNITHOLOGIST, A Wildly Imaginative, Absurdist Queer Cinema

The increasing absurdity, punctuated by beautiful images of nature, this leisurely paced film is an intoxicating mix of madcap imagination and sensory cinematic experience that is truly hard to forget. It would make a great threesome with Christophe Honoré's Metamorphoses and Alain Giuradie's Staying Vertical as examples of recent playful, eccentric and adventurous queer cinema at its best.

Toronto Japanese Fest 2017 Review: HIMEANOLE, A Violent Condemnation of Bullying And Inaction

Okada Susumu (Hamada Gaku) works part time cleaning buildings with his friend Ando Yuji (Muro Tsuyoshi). Ando asks Susumu to be a go between for himself and Abe Yuka (Satsukawa Aimi), a cafe worker. When they go to the cafe...

Toronto Japanese Fest 2017 Review: DANCHI, A Superb Example of Subdued Comedy

After their son’s tragic death the Yamashita’s, Hinako (Fujiyama Naomi) and Seiji (Kishibe Ittoku), sell their herbal medicine store and move into an apartment complex, a Danchi, in Osaka,. The building is maybe half full and most of the residents...

Review: ONCE UPON A TIME IN VENICE Makes You Remember Other Times

Today marks the release of a new action comedy with Bruce Willis, and a curious thing it is. Once Upon a Time in Venice sports a truly incredible cast, who are then placed as cartoon characters in a shallow pastiche...

Blu-ray Review: MARTIN SCORSESE'S WORLD CINEMA PROJECT VOL. 2, A Trip Worth Taking

Nearly five years after Criterion released Martin Scorsese's World Cinema Project Volume One, an impressive box set of six films from around the world, we finally have its first follow up, Volume Two. Like the first volume in both packaging,...

Review: MAUDIE, Art and Beauty in the Smallest Places

Biopics of visual artists are (or can be) some of the more interesting of that mode of film: it's fairly simple to show a painter creating their work, or show the inspiration for that work. Too often, artists who are...

Review: LOST IN PARIS, Somewhere Between Whimsy, Winsome and Wonderful

The latest collaboration between Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon is a delicate, breezy and entirely endearing comic tale of love and kinship. Herewith I will admit to my shameful, total ignorance of the couple's previous features, L'iceberg (2005), Rumba (2008)...

Review: FUNERAL PARADE OF ROSES, Japan's Queer Underground Cinema Classic Never Looked Better

Cinelicious Pics did it last year with their restoration of Belladonna of Sadness, and this time they do it again with a needed restoration of what is still among the most important works of transgressive Japanese cinema of that time,...