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Blu-ray Review: SID & NANCY's Slime Shines Brighter On New Criterion Blu-ray

Alex Cox's Sid & Nancy is a classic amour fou romance plastered over the backdrop of London's emerging punk scene of the late '70s. The film is the approximately real-life story of the life and death of Sex Pistols' bassist...

Review: LOGAN LUCKY Races for the Big Score, Finishing Above Average

How lucky are we? I suppose that depends upon how you feel about the work of director Steven Soderbergh. One of the most deliberately eclectic and diverse filmmakers in the history of Hollywood, Soderbergh has seen fit to shift gears...

Locarno 2017 Review: In WINTER BROTHERS, "Being Loved and Fucked" Is the Axiom

The feature-lenght and idiosyncratic debut by Icelandinc emerging talent Hlynur Pálmason probes the crevasses of male psyche in melancholic Nordic psychological drama

Review: CALIFORNIA TYPEWRITER, 50 Million Mechanical Keyboard Fans Can't Be Wrong

I am typing this on a keyboard attached to my laptop computer because the laptop's own keyboard started acting up shortly after I purchased it in 2015. This never happened with my Smith-Corona electric typewriter, which my father gave me...

Review: MARJORIE PRIME, The Haunting Power of Memory and Love

How much of our personality, our reactions to situations, our relationships with our loved ones, determined by our memories, of them and ourselves? (A somewhat rherotical question, as I think the answer is quite a lot). As we age, and...

Review: THE HITMAN'S BODYGUARD Shoots Wide of the Mark

Spoiler: Patrick Hughes' The Hitman's Bodyguard ends with a post-credits stinger in which Ryan Reynolds sits at a bar, waiting for his cue only to be put off by a five-minute church bell song, and ultimately ending with a half-funny...

Melbourne 2017 Review: PERSON TO PERSON, A Wonderfully Expansive New York Narrative

Expanded from the quirky short of the same name, Person to Person is an effortless riff on a specific indie vibe. Crafted lovingly and naturally by director Dustin Guy Defa, Person to Person moves from his initial concept, following the quest...

Review: V.I.P. Is D.O.A.

Following his period epic The Tiger, director Park Hoon-jung scales down his ambitions for the North Korea-themed investigative thriller V.I.P., a brooding procedural that lumbers its way through a serial killer tale mired in political intrigue. Much like his hit...

Review: PARADOX Scores Another Hit for the SPL Franchise

Louis Koo plays a vengeful cop rampaging through Thailand in Paradox, the third instalment of Hong Kong's SPL action franchise. Director Wilson Yip returns to the helm, as does action choreographer Sammo Hung, while Koo is joined in front of the camera...

Review: CALICO SKIES, Quiet Desperation in the California Desert

A slight, delicate flower, Phoenix has planted himself in the middle of nowhere. Also known as the Mojave Desert in California, this particular "nowhere" is quiet, spacious, and sparsely populated. And that's just how Phoenix, portrayed with somber gravity by...

Blu-ray Review: Mike Leigh's MEANTIME, A Well-Timed Criterion Release

One of many, many, many films I'd never heard of before Criterion sought to add it to their numbers (number 890 in this case), Mike Leigh's 1984 TV movie Meantime comes across as an unintentional political statement. It pulls us...

Now on Blu-ray: Look To Vinegar Syndrome For Sleazy, Scary Fun On These Six Discs

It's summertime, and the living is sleazy when it comes to Vinegar Syndrome's latest releases on Blu-ray. Today we're looking at their May and June output - sorry, we got a bit behind - and there's a little something here...

Review: THE MIMIC, A Slick and Spirited Addition to K-Horror

Four years after his strong debut Hide and Seek, director Huh Jung returns to a mid-August release date with his follow-up The Mimic. With better-than-average casting, this chilling and polished countryside take on a local urban legend may be the...

Review: THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE, A Nutty Surprise

Everyone loves to be pleasantly surprised by a movie.  What's even better?  Being surprised by being pleasantly surprised by a movie.   There is no known expectation of The Nut Job sequel being any good in any way.  The 2014...

Melbourne 2017 Review: INGRID GOES WEST, Hashtag Essential Satire

Truly great films that exist for the moment tackle relevant and contemporary themes, acting at times as a mirror into our own lives and critically picking apart what makes society function. It is refreshing, then, that Matt Spicer’s Ingrid Goes...

Review: In Brendan Muldowney's PILGRIMAGE, Faith Is a Weapon

Ireland in the 13th century is an island divided by war and fraught with peril as close as the next turn. An isolated group of Benedictine monks are the keepers of a holy relic when the church in Rome calls...

Review: WITHOUT, A Haunting, Harrowing Portrayal of Grief

One of the most deeply rewarding indies of the last ten years finally gets a release in America.

Blu-ray Review: THE BREAKING POINT, Brutal, Merciless Melodrama on Criterion

Remakes are not always bad things. Take, for example, The Breaking Point, based on a novel by Ernest Hemingway. First published in 1937, To Have and Have Not followed the adventures of Harry Morgan, a fishing boat captain in Key...

Locarno 2017 Review: METEORS Exhibits A Poetic Side of Docu-Fiction Hybrids

Turkish filmmaker Gürcan Keltek introduces his first feature-length film Meteors living a double life as a documentary and fiction film while preserving the urgency of its message in both instances

Review: THE TRIP TO SPAIN, Yet Another Hilarious Culinary Journey from Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon

Calling The Trip to Spain anything other than an overly indulgent project would be an understatement: the endless in-jokes, impersonations and food porn aplenty. But who cares? As a fan of the series and Coogan and Brydon's sardonic banter, Spain is by far the funniest of the three.