Festivals: Tribeca Reviews

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Tribeca 2016 Review: ALWAYS SHINE, In Which The Hollywood Dream Factory Becomes A Nightmare

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny...

Tribeca 2016 Review: ALWAYS SHINE, In Which the Hollywood Dream Factory Becomes A Nightmare

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny...

Review: HERE ALONE, Having Loved And Lost In Time Of The Apocalypse

Two of the most mis-quoted lines in Lord Tennyson’s poem ‘In Memoriam’ are… 'Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all. These lines are often taken out of their context (the author’s mourning the...

Tribeca 2016 Review: THE LONER Journeys Through A Neon Dreamscape

sounds intriguing on paper: a former child soldier from Iran drifts through L.A.'s seedy underbelly and becomes entangled in a web of crime, violence, and drugs. Heavily influenced by films like Drive and David Lynch's oeuvre -- one of...

Tribeca 2016 Review: ICAROS: A VISION Creates A Palpable Sense Of Place

Icaros: A Vision is about a white, American woman who -- confronted with a terminal illness -- embarks on a trip for a seemingly indefinite stay at a Shamanistic resort in the jungles of Peru. With a synopsis like this,...

Tribeca 2016 Review: KICKS, Announcing An Exciting New Talent

Kicks, a film about a hapless teenager who finds himself launched into the Bay Area's violent underbelly after being jumped for his new sneakers, bristles with immediacy, excitement and urgency. It's a remarkably assured, confident movie for a debut feature...

Tribeca 2016 Review: FOLK HERO & FUNNY GUY, A Witty Tale Of Best Friends (And Frenemies) On The Road

One of the key ingredients for a successful film is a good title. And one thing that makes for a good title is one that is perfectly descriptive of the movie within.   Jeff Grace's witty, diverting feature debut Folk...

Tribeca 2016 Review: HOLIDAYS Celebrates Fun Genre Filmmaking Any Day Of The Year

Any good horror anthology usually starts with a solid linking concept. It could be a wraparound or theme or even just the whole alphabet. In Holidays, the concept was pretty obvious. It's also pretty genius. Get a bunch of talented...

Tribeca 2015 Review: MAGGIE, An Elegant Zombie Melodrama

Geoff Gilmore, chief creative officer of the Tribeca Film Festival, in his introduction to the world premiere of Maggie, the first feature by Henry Hobson - starring some guy you may have heard of named Arnold Schwarzenegger - called the...

Tribeca 2014 Review: MISCONCEPTION Challenges What You Think You Know About Overpopulation

Jessica Yu has created some of the finest and most formally innovative documentaries of the past decade, such as In the Realms of the Unreal (2004) and Protagonist (2007). Her latest film Misconception, which recently had its world premiere at...

Tribeca 2014 Review: ICE POISON, A Mesmerizing, Stark Depiction of Drugs and Poverty in Burma

Grinding poverty and severely restricted life and economic choices push two impoverished denizens of Myanmar into drug dealing, and using, with predictably dire consequences in Midi Z's strong, stylistically assured third feature Ice Poison. As in his previous features Return...

Tribeca 2014 Review: LAND HO! Takes Us On An Immensely Charming Icelandic Road Trip

The wonderfully freewheeling, peripatetic road movie Land Ho!, spanning the vast, rich Icelandic landscape, marks the first collaboration between two talented independent filmmakers: Martha Stephens (Passenger Pigeons, Pilgrim Song) and Aaron Katz (Dance Party USA, Quiet City, Cold Weather). Together, they...

Tribeca 2014 Review: TIME IS ILLMATIC, An Illuminating Look Back at the Creation of a Hip-Hop Classic

This year's Tribeca Film Festival got off to a rousing start with the screening (and accompanying concert by its subject) of Time is Illmatic, a documentary by multimedia artist One9 about the making of Nas' immensely influential 1994 debut album...

Tribeca 2014 Review: Slinging Potatoes And Pills BENEATH THE HARVEST SKY

People have been trying to escape small towns since the existence of small towns. In fact, you could argue that The Garden of Eden, as perfect as it was, was the first small town, and Adam and Eve subconsciously wanted...

Tribeca 2014 Review: The Jury Has Reached a Verdict: ALEX OF VENICE is Guilty of Being Great

Life is hard, struggle is real. There should be a class in college that teaches about how life really works -- lots of disappointment, heartbreak and starting over when you thought your life was set. This is perhaps the most...

Tribeca 2014 Review: DER SAMURAI Giveth (Head) and It Taketh (Head) Away

Der Samurai is the type of film I live for: well made and weird. I count myself lucky if I come across a film like this once every festival or so (unless that festival happens to be Fantastic Fest, in...

Tribeca 2014 Review: Ivan Kavanagh Dumps All of His Fears into THE CANAL

Take one part Lynchian weirdness, one part Polanski paranoia, toss in a hefty dose of J-Horror, mix 'em and cook 'em in a pot like gumbo, as the noted American poet Ice Cube once said, add just a smidgen of...

Tribeca 2013 Review: Does MR. JONES Take Found Footage Horror To A New Dimension?

"Scott is a filmmaker in need of inspiration..." in a film whose very genre is in need of inspiration: found footage horror. The TFF festival guide bills Mr. Jones' writer/director, Karl Mueller, as someone who has "taken the found footage...

Tribeca 2013 Review: STAND CLEAR OF THE CLOSING DOORS Proves A Unique And Lyrical Journey On The Autistic Spectrum

Stand Clear Of The Closing Doors is one of those rare tone poems that successfully straddles the line between an abstract avalanche of emotions and images and true narrative, complete with arcs, climax, and resolution. It's the story of a...

Tribeca 2013 Review: THE TRIALS OF MUHAMMAD ALI Lacks Novelty And The Figurative Punch, But Provides Plenty of The Literal Kind

Muhammad Ali, aka Cassius Clay, is one of the most famous boxers in history, and one of the more recognizable names in all of sports. His legendary strength, speed, power, and his incredible brashness and pride set him apart from...