DREAMLAND Reunites Bruce McDonald, Tony Burgess and Stephen McHattie for a New Genre Mashup

Fans of Pontypool may rejoice for the beginning of production on Bruce McDonald's latest film, Dreamland. It reunites the director with writer Tony Burgess and star Stephen McHattie. While not the long rumoured sequel to the Canadian cult semiotic zombie film...

10+ Years Later: 28 WEEKS LATER Has A Fierce Bite

I do not quite recall the mood around 28 Weeks Later upon its 2007 release. I remember the wonderful “Maintain The Quarantine” poster, and that the production was financed at the full flush of Fox Atomic, 20th Century Fox’s ill-fated...

Exclusive: Sono! Sabu! Uchida! Animerama! Third Window Films 2018 Slate Looks Amazing!

Third Window Films, the English-speaking world's most well-respected distributors of comtemporary and modern Asian films on home video, has had a rough year, but they are revved-up and ready to go with a 2018 slate of releases that looks out...

Screen Anarchists On BLADE RUNNER 2049

We almost didn't publish a "Screen Anarchists On BLADE RUNNER 2049" article. I did a quick tally among our editors, critics and contributors, and everybody seemed to like the film. Now that ain't interesting, is it? We want divisiveness...

Sitges 2017 Review: CANIBA Challenges You To Take A Long Look At A Murderer

And now for something truly different. Unconventional in almost every way, Caniba is the latest anthropological and psychological inquest from Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor. Their previous film, Leviathan, made for the Harvard Sensory Ethnography Lab wordlessly looked at the...

Sitges 2017 Review: MARLINA THE MURDERER IN FOUR ACTS, a Traditional Western Story Told in a Fresh Way

In making a film, any film, it is nearly essential to have an image or scene that the audience takes away with them. Think about a film you love, and get it in your minds eye, and that is what...

Sitges 2017 Review: TEHRAN TABOO, a Savage Look at the Paradox that is Modern Iran

Blunt, angry and eye-opening, Tehran Taboo offers a scathing portrait of Iran’s largest city. Think of it as Short Cuts meets Persepolis, although that facile shorthand does not begin to get at just how much is going on, plot and...

Interview: 78/52 Director Alexandre O. Philippe Talks Voyeurism and Mirrors

With the release of the superb documentary 78/52, focusing on the construction, and deconstruction, of the shower scene from Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 masterpiece, Psycho, I had a chance to sit down and chat briefly with Alexandre O. Phillipe regarding that...

Sitges 2017 Interview: HAGAZUSSA DP Mariel Baqueiro on Snow, Swamps and Magical Moments

A singluar work of visual story telling, almost dialouge free, Hagazussa: A Heathen's Curse is one of those movies that you are not entirely sure of what you just witnessed in terms of narrative structure and detail, but you know...

Sitges 2017 Review: DHOGS Plays Cinematic Games With Its Audience

First time director Andrés Goteira wants his audience to play a game. He is open and up front about this early on by inserting his own audience into the opening shots of the film, and will come back to them periodically...

Sitges 2017 Review: CREEP 2, a Lark on Sequels, Oversharing and Midlife Crises

"It's like a job now," confesses cinema's goofiest serial killer, Josef. Mark Duplass returns to both the wolf-mask and uncomfortable sharing shenanigans that define his character's comedy. He is trying to articulate the feeling that happens when the initial thrill...

Review: DO DONKEYS ACT? Where Poetry and Empathy Get Curiously Cozy

"Plunge into the intrinsic range of unfamiliar expressions, inside this wild sanctuary that offers a sonorious glimpse into the reveries, melodies, and rhapsodies of a great donkey orchestra."   What is undoubtedly one of the strangest documentaries of 2017, David...

Review: REALIVE, Where Exact Science Is Not An Exact Science

When screenwriters turn towards directing their own features, the case is often that they can make their talkiest screenplay into a film. This is not necessary a bad thing at all, especially considering the case of Mateo Gil's new science...

LET THERE BE LIGHT Interview: Director Mila Aung-Thwin, Physicists Mark Henderson and Michel Laberge Discuss Nuclear Fusion Becoming Mainstream

And now for something completely different. Many of the writing staff here at ScreenAnarchy have different careers outside of their movie enthusiasms. Myself, I have a degree in Chemistry, and work as a materials scientist. So when the opportunity to...

Review: LET THERE BE LIGHT, When Modern Science and Spiritual Quests Meet

There is something magnificent about human endeavours that require several lifetimes to achieve. The Basílica i Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família in Barcelona was started in 1888 by architect Antoni Gaudí, but he will have been dead for 100...

ScreenPrint: PAPERBACKS FROM HELL Delights in Pulp Taxonomy

Welcome to our new feature, one that aims to looks at books, the original screen - not counting cave paintings and the Code of Hamurabi. We will typically be talking about books about movies in this space, but here for...

Toronto 2017 Review: THE CRESCENT, A Visionary Fusion of Horror Tradition and Originality

Late in Seth A. Smith's The Crescent, there is a hushed shot of the lead character, who happens to be a 2-year-old toddler, sitting on a beach, framed inside an hollow wreck of an old seaside house. The camera slowly...

Toronto 2017 Review: BRAWL IN CELL BLOCK 99, Prestige Grindhouse Moviemaking

Sometimes, you have to smash things to bits before life can get better. But then life only gets better for a while before it gets much, much worse. More smashing is required, some resolution gained. Then, well, hmmm, that seems...

Toronto 2017 Review: EUTHANIZER Unflinchingly Considers Misery and Karma With An Offbeat Finnish Worldview

Welcome to Haukka's Repairs And End Solutions. A dilapidated auto repair shop in a small town in Finland where the proprietor, Veijo, occasionally fixes cars, but mainly he runs a business of putting down pets for owners unwilling to pay...

Toronto 2017 Short Film, Short Review: GREAT CHOICE

A woman gets stuck in a Red Lobster commercial. That is the helluva succinct elevator pitch for Robin Comisar's short film that recently graced the Ryerson screen of Toronto's Midnight Madness.  Great Choice meticulously recreates said Red Lobster advert from...