Have Your Say: Aggregate Review Scores Are Good / Bad

Director Brett Ratner made some waves last week, when he publicly stated his opinion about aggregate review scores. I quote from Entertainment Weekly's article about it: The worst thing that we have in today's movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. I...

Calgary Underground 2017 Announces Lineup: Kaiju! Bigfoot! Booze! Headbangers! Sugar-Cereal! and The Shower Scene

The Calgary Underground Film Festival (CUFF) has been quietly kicking ass for 13 years. Being overshadowed somewhat by larger festivals in larger Canadian cities like Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver, or even its bigger sister, the Calgary International Film Festival (CIFF),...

Review: I, OLGA HEPNAROVA, A Study in the Absence of Empathy

At one point over the course of this haunting and difficult film, the lead character is reading the Graham Greene novel, The Quiet American. She highlights a passage from the novel that is the lynchpin to understanding the unanswerable questions left...

Screen Anarchists On KONG: SKULL ISLAND

Unless you've been living under a (skull-shaped?) rock, you're probably aware there is a new King Kong film in theaters. It's called Kong: Skull Island, and opinions about it within Screen Anarchy are divided, to say the least. Kwenton...

"One Day You'll Pay": I, OLGA HEPNAROVA Gets A Trailer And Poster For Its March 24th US Opening

While Polish filmmaker Agnieszka Smoczynska's killer mermaid musical The Lure may be getting all the press, there was another film from Eastern Europe quietly racking up award after award and stunning festival audiences last year. Tomás Weinreb and Petr Kazda's I,...

Review: PERSONAL SHOPPER, Kristen Stewart, Restless Spirits and Luxury Goods

French critic-turned-filmmaker Olivier Assayas has always had a knack for combining verité, day-to-day life with stylish genre elements. His previous film, The Clouds of Sils Maria, coaxed a assured performance out of Kristen Stewart as a confident personal assistant to a...

10+ Years Later: SUNSHINE Is Still Waiting For The Light

With Danny Boyle's forthcoming revisit of the world of Edinburgh junkies, lowlifes and dropouts twenty years on, it would seem fitting that we have a look at Trainspotting (1996) and where it stands in the culture 20 years on. But we...

Review: MY SCIENTOLOGY MOVIE, Less a Documentary and More a Provocation

The Church of Scientology has been well covered, or rather exposed, in the culture over the last decade or more. Popular magazine features, such as the New Yorker's 2011 piece on Paul Haggis ("The Apostate"), as well as host of...

Review: BITTER HARVEST Is Bad Canadian Borscht

In between the two World Wars, the then nascent Soviet Union, in a barbarous act of mismanaged nation building, starved north of seven million Ukrainians to death, all the while violently appropriating the land and the crops from the 'bread...

Review: THE GIRL WITH ALL THE GIFTS, A Heady Mix of Arthouse, Genre and Zombies

Opening with the eponymous girl locked in a cell and counting upwards to a thousand, The Girl With All The Gifts may as well be ticking off the sheer number of zombie films that a fan of the genre is...

Interview: THE RED TURTLE Director Michael Dudok de Wit Talks Studio Ghibli and More

Dutch animator, director and illustrator, Michael Dudok de Wit is the first foreign director to collaborate with Studio Ghibli as the Japanese animation house embarks into foreign waters and international production. After years of making award winning shorts (how many...

Review: GOLD Is Not Entirely Worth Its Weight

Are you old enough to recall Bre-X? If not, Stephen Gaghan's Gold is a fanciful, fictional retelling of a story about Wall Street greed and hubris that is happy to take the cautionary tale and gild it with Hollywood glitz....

Review: THE FOUNDER, There Will Be Burgers

The evolving nature of the film biopic has recently become quite interesting to me. Insofar as Pablo Larraín's Jackie is as much about Theodore H. White's Life magazine article as it is about the iconic First Lady, so John Lee Hancock's...

THE LURE: Red-band Trailer for Agnieszka Smoczynska's Superlative Musical

From Sundance to Sitges, The Lure was one of the purest delights on the festival circuit last year. The debut feature from Polish director Agnieszka Smoczynska is a thoroughly unorthodox adaptation of Hans Christian Anderson’s The Little Mermaid, re-envisioned as a 1980s nightclub...

ScreenAnarchy's Top 10 Movies of 2016

This year, 23 Screen Anarchists from 11 countries around the globe shared with us 129 films for consideration in our collective top ten movies of 2016. Our criteria was simple: an individual contributor could include a film on their ballot...

Screen Anarchists On ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY

(Do anarchists like rogues and rebels, or is there a disturbance in The Force?) Earlier this week I managed to get into a 3D IMAX screening of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, and I was surprised to notice...

The Many Faces of James Earl Jones

This week sees the worldwide release of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, the first in a series of stand-alone films taking place in the famed franchise's universe. According to our Jim Tudor it is quite good, and it has...

The Many Faces of Dame Judi Dench

Today sees the 82nd birthday of Dame Judi Dench, so this week we dedicate the quiz to her! A renowned actress for over six decades, she achieved worldwide fame at age 60 when she took on the role of "M"...

The Many Faces Of Richard E. Grant

This week sees the American wide release of Pablo LarraĆ­n's Jackie, starring Natalie Portman as the famous First Lady in the week following the murder of her husband John F. Kennedy. Other notable actors in the film are Peter Sarsgaard,...

The Many Faces Of Mifune Toshiro

This week sees the American premiere of Steven Okazaki's documentary Mifune: The Last Samurai, about probably the most famous Japanese actor of all time: Mifune Toshiro. In his review Patryk Czekaj calls it "...a perfectly informative and well-researched documentary that...