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Review: EVOLUTION, a Strange, Unsettling Tale of Body Horror

I'm a great believer in minimalism, particularly when it comes to body horror in film. Used carefully and deliberately, a few choice scenes can have far more weight in a story and a far more effective impact on the audience. ...

Black Nights 2016 Review: THE WHITE KING, Dystopia Through A Child's Eyes

Dystopian film and literature has taken a turn from science fiction to possible current affairs, in our recent political climate. With the rise of right-wing political ideology and right-wing political control of influential countries, these stories are more important than...

Black Nights 2016 Review: A MONSTER CALLS, Emotional Manipulation at its Finest

You might be able to argue that J.A. Bayona is not the most original filmmaker current working today, but there is no denying that he has a masterful understanding of how to direct a film that will grab (almost) all...

Black Nights 2016 Review: VIOLENTLY HAPPY, Theatre of Intimacy and Pain

Most of us spend our lives trying to avoid pain. Whether it be physical or emotional, our bodily instinct (at least for physical pain) seeks to keep us out of harm's way. Emotional pain is harder to avoid even though...

Black Nights 2016 Review: Steven Cantor's DANCER Dazzles, But Risks Falling Short

Director Steven Cantor turns his attention to ballet prodigy Sergei Polunin in his latest documentary, Dancer. Having already taken the stage at the 60th BFI London Film Festival, and now returning for an encore at Tallinn's Doc@POFF strand, this feature-length...

Black Nights 2016 Review: THE LAND OF THE ENLIGHTENED Enchants With Its Docu-drama Blend

If there's one thing everybody needs to know about, it's Tallin Black Nights (or PÖFF as it is rather fantastically named in Estonian). Having gained A-list status back in 2014, it's now officially one of the top fifteen film festivals...

Review: ELLE, Sordid Without Being Exploitational

Paul Verhoeven is one of the more unique directors in cinema history. As perhaps the most famous Dutch auteur, he's gone from ribald little European films to the biggest of Hollywood bangs, incorporating his unique wit, visual sense and narrative...

Blu-ray Review: Severin Films' BURIAL GROUND, the Definitive Look at a Gut-Munching Gore Feast

If you're a Burial Ground fan, this is definitely the disc to own. Great image quality and comprehensive bonus materials make this an easy recommendation.

Blu-ray Review: Berlanga's THE EXECUTIONER, A Satirical Masterpiece

The Executioner is the story of an undertaker who falls in love with the daughter of an executioner and who is then forced to take over for his father-in-law when the elder ages out of service.

Trieste 2016 Review: VIRTUAL REVOLUTION

As video games become more cinematic in their audio-visual aesthetic, so films are looking to video games for inspiration. But though there can be some crossover, these are still two different mediums that require different approaches to storytelling. Guy-Roger Duvert's...

Trieste 2016 Review: THE OPEN, Sport at the End of the World

What if your life's dream, a goal you had been working years to achieve, was suddenly made impossible by, say, the end of civilization as we know it? What if a global war meant that any semblance of your old...

Trieste 2016 Review: MONOLITH, Motherhood Locked Out

High-concept films are generally the norm for any movie falling into the sci-fi category. Often, such concepts result in a film that focuses more on action and fancy effects; sometimes, the high concept is used to examine one or a...

Trieste 2016 Review: BLIND SUN, The Slow Burning of Madness

Joyce A. Nashawati's debut feature Blind Sun has been making the rounds of festivals for a year, so I was surprised to discover it had yet to be reviewed on Screen Anarchy. I was also quite pleased, as it was...

Trieste 2016 Review: SUM OF HISTORIES, Don't Mess with Time

It is no new theme of time travel in science fiction, that attempts to change the past for what one considers the better, often ends up making things worse. Even if the desire is just to make one simple change,...

Trieste 2016 Review: MORGAN is an Inconsistent Mess

A trend I began to notice a few years ago with much of Hollywood film (and some independent American cinema as well) was a sore lack of good scripts. Not even outstanding ones, just good scripts with good dialogue and...

Trieste 2016 Review: FOR THE LOVE OF SPOCK, A Fascinating Portrait

More than any other character or image from the 50-year culture phenomenon that is Star Trek, arguably nothing is more instantly recognizable than Spock, and his gesture of greeting. When Leonard Nimoy died last year, the outpouring of affection was...

Review: THE WINDMILL, A Bloody But Tepid Slasher Flick

Jennifer is an Australian nanny in Amsterdam, Netherlands. When her secret past surfaces she flees into the night.   The next morning she finds her way onto a tour bus that offers trips outside of the city, visiting the country’s...

Brooklyn Horror 2016 Review: WITHOUT NAME, Visionary Horror That Transports

Easily the most transporting film, horror or otherwise, I’ve seen in a long time, Without Name is one of those works of art I’ll now carry around inside me. Like certain pieces of music. Like certain poems. To be more...

Vancouver 2016 Review: THE UNKNOWN GIRL, All Quiet Revelations, Resignation and Modest Hope

While its central conceit is decidedly sensational in nature, The Unknown Girl (La fille inconnue) unfolds at a mundanely methodical trot that has come to be expected of the Dardenne brothers. Their latest film revolves around a confident and talented...

Review: DESIERTO, Some of the Most Exciting Cinema This Year

Having learned a few tricks working on his father’s multi-award winning space thriller Gravity, Jonas Cuarón brings the action down to earth to craft a similarly intense tale of human survival. The idea of putting up a wall between Mexico...