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Oak Cliff 2018 Review: I AM NOT A WITCH, A Superb Film From A Prodigious New Talent

A young girl, unremarkable in any way, is walking down a path in rural Zambia. Suddenly, a woman walking ahead of her carrying a large bucket or water falls to the ground, losing her load. As the fallen woman looks...

Review: THE NIGHT OF THE VIRGIN Drags On, Then Barely Delivers As WTF Genre Cinema

Roberto San Sebastián’s The Night of the Virgin (aka La noche del virgen) is one of those genre films that, since early on, you know it’ll be all about the execution of its climax. The basic setting goes like this:...

Blu-ray Review: A Double Dose of Cristian Mungiu's New Romanian Cinema Comes to the Criterion Collection

The Criterion Collection works its way through both a long list of canon classics from the history of film, and a parallel track of what it considers to be the most important voices in world cinema today. This gives us...

London Indian Film Festival 2018 Review: WHAT WILL PEOPLE SAY Takes A Hard Look At A Clash Of Cultures

Director Iram Haq's What Will People Say is a powerful experience that has the potential to ruffle feathers on each side of the argument regarding the responsibilities of immigrants to assimilate into their adopted cultures. An Norwegian-Pakistani woman, here Haq...

Blu-ray Review: KING OF HEARTS, Still a Compelling Portrait of Madness

If you view them as mentally ill, you won’t enjoy yourself too much. Not in this day and age. And rightfully so. I’m referring to the residents, central to Phlippe De Broca’s antiwar farce King of Hearts, of the French...

Review: HAPPY AS LAZZARO, Fable and Lyrical Social Drama Collide in Magical Neorealism

Alice Rohrwacher's latest feature smoothly merges the tradition of neorealism and magical realism in a socially conscious modern fable doubling as drama.

Cannes 2018 Review: DOGMAN, Homo Homini Canis

Matteo Garrone's latest feature-length effort sees a harmless man being pushed to extremes.

Review: Carla Simón's Autobiographical SUMMER 1993 Reflects Childhood, Tragedy and Love

Catalan director Carla Simón's first feature, Summer 1993, is a touching autobiographical film about the AIDS crisis in the 90s seen through a child's eye.

Beldocs 2018 Review: BORN JUST NOW, Portrait of an Artist In Context

Robert Adanto´s documentary portrait Born Just Now illuminates Serbian performance art scene

Cannes 2018 Review: Abbasi's BORDER Blurs Lines to Wondrous Effect

When Ali Abbasi burst onto the international scene with the quietly unnerving Shelley, the world took note of a writer-director with a feel for creating an immersive atmosphere and a keen understanding of fantastical films’ capacity for dispensing understated social...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC Keeps the Faith

I couldn’t go to church on the evening of Good Friday this year, so instead I watched The Passion of Joan of Arc.  The choice was solid, for a number of reasons.  I watched the completely silent version, said to...

Review: REVENGE Fearlessly Subverts the Subgenre

There is one inviolable rule of the rape-revenge genre: the revenge must be complete. Other than that, all bets are off. French director Coralie Fargeat takes this to heart in her feature debut, Revenge, and she does not disappoint her...

Hot Docs 2018 Review: THE RUSSIAN JOB Makes You Laugh on the Inside

How is this for an elevator pitch:  What if Roy Andersson directed Roger & Me? No pitch is necessary, because a collaboration between a Czech journalist, Petr Horký, and freelance photographer (and regular contributor to the New York Times) Milan...

Hot Docs 2018 Review: CERES Connects Children to the Land

With so much of the worlds population living in cities, where all the food comes from the grocery store, or some variant of urban market, immediate, highly proximate documentaries such as Janet Van den Bran's Ceres are essential. She follows...

Hot Docs 2018 Review: DREAMING MURAKAMI, Found In Translation

The perfect sentence does not exist. Language is a way of thinking, but it is a boundary, not the infinite. Perhaps, there is a perfect thought. Or a perfect dream. There is very likely a perfect musical note. Language remains...

Tribeca 2018 Review: LEMONADE, Male Toxicity Contaminates the Promised Land

The feature debut by Ioana Uricaru is a Romanian New Wave shrouded as U.S. indie.

Tribeca 2018 Dispatch: Recommended Genre Shorts

In 2018 Tribeca’s overall shorts program, as in past years, has been both vast and satisfying. Perhaps more impressively, the genre shorts are particularly strong, not just token entries included to appease certain audience segments. These, then, are some of...

Review: MRS. HYDE, Packing a Punch in Screwball Comedy Form

Serge Bozon's idiosyncratic WWI musical comedy La France impressed me when I watched it some years ago. In it, he demystified war heroics and masculinity with his deadpan humor. In Mrs. Hyde, in his peculiar way, Bozon takes jabs at...

Review: LET THE SUNSHINE IN, Loose and Light Romantic Comedy

I think Claire Denis has been hanging out with Hong Sang-soo a little too much because I never expected her to do a wordy romantic comedy! And the result is delightful! It boasts the best rolling end credit of any...

Review: THE FENCER, History Crosses Swords at School

Endel is hiding. In The Fencer (Miekkailija), which has recently been issued as a fine-looking DVD from Music Box Films and is also available to watch via various VOD platforms, Endel Nelis (Mart Avandi) has returned to his Estonian homeland...