Tag: toddhaynes

New York 2017 Review: WONDERSTRUCK, Why We Go to the Movies

“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.” -Oscar Wilde If we were to conduct a poll of all of our writers’ and readers’ favorite live-action kids movies – and I really think...

NYC Weekend Picks, Jan 20-22: Dealing with Trump, Early Scorsese, Adapting Patricia Highsmith, Poetic Docs From Iran, and a Jarmusch Classic

I wasn’t with it, but just that very minute, it occurred to me the suckers had authority … – Public Enemy, “Black Steel in the Hour of Chaos”   Today is when it all goes down, figuratively and literally. Regardless of...

Destroy All Monsters: Systems Of Control In CAROL

Some spoilers for Carol. Carol is one of the best films of the year, beautifully mounted by Todd Haynes, based on Patricia Highsmith's novel. It pays close attention to the tools of its trade: framing, composition, editing, and sound choices...

Interview: Screenwriter Phyllis Nagy On Adapting CAROL

Two years before Patricia Highsmith would earn acclaim with the release of her 1950 suspense novel, Strangers on a Train, she was working as a shopgirl selling dolls at a department store. Legend goes that one day an elegant, beautiful...

Review: CAROL, A Magnificent Mood For A Story That Doesn't Quite Connect

Todd Haynes' Carol is an objectively beautiful film. It is exquisitely acted, hauntingly shot and meticulously well-designed. And it left me surprisingly cold. The same-sex melodrama presents an interesting case where form and content match up a little too well....

New York 2015 Interview: Todd Haynes On Falling For CAROL

In Todd Haynes' new film, Cate Blanchett plays Carol, the object of uncharted desire for Therese (Rooney Mara), a young girl ill-equipped to handle this foreign attraction. Since the film exists in the closed-minded postwar years, circa late 40s, the courtship...

Cannes 2015 Review: CAROL, Tremendously Accomplished, Yet Cold

Todd Haynes' Carol is an objectively beautiful film. It is exquisitely acted, hauntingly shot and meticulously well-designed. And it left me surprisingly cold. The same-sex melodrama presents an interesting case where form and content match up a little too well....