Review: IN ORDER OF DISAPPEARANCE, An Exceptional Scandinavian Thriller

I think it's pretty hard not to completely adore Stellan Skarsgård. From his achingly perfect performances working with Lars Von Trier to comic book blockbusters like Thor to the original Insomnia, he's one of the great actors of this or any...

Fantasia 2016: Screen Anarchy Wraps The Fest With Our Reviews, Interviews, and Top Picks

  The king-sized 20th edition of the Fantasia International Film Festival has come to a close, and thus ends another year of 'summer-camp' for lovers of genre and intrepid explorers of the weird, and wild, undiscovered corners that lie...

Fantasia 2016 Review: SHE'S ALLERGIC TO CATS, Disturbing and Comic in Equal Measure

So, what do you want from a weird, sketchy, indie genre film? How about a cool backstory, where the director (Michael Reich) supposedly funded the film in part by being a Daft Punk body double? Or how about mixing pop...

Fantasia 2016 Review: MAN UNDERGROUND, A Love Letter to the Thrills of Conspiracy

William Koda (George Basil) is a man with a story to tell. Once a geologist for the U.S. government, he now spends his time in upstate New York telling tales of digging tunnels deep underground where they uncovered…something. Speaking to...

Melbourne 2016: ScreenAnarchy Does MIFF

Celebrating its 65th edition, the Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) has revealed its full program. With the festival now less than a week away, let's take a look at the highlights, some personal recommendations, and ScreenAnarchy reviewed gems from festivals...

Review: CAFE SOCIETY, Woody Allen's Entertaining, If Familiar, Comedy

You ever see the Woody Allen film about the older man who’s in love with a younger woman, only to have her torn between her affection for another nebbishy guy? Sure, it’s fair to say that Allen’s treading on familiar...

Review: THE BFG, Steven Spielberg's Infectious Sense of Play Returns to the Fore

Once upon a time Steven Spielberg was the fabulist of our time. Looking at Close Encounters of the Third Kind or E.T or even Jurassic Park and A.I., you could see a sense of wonder and playfulness in his filmmaking,...

Review: EAT THAT QUESTION - FRANK ZAPPA IN HIS OWN WORDS, A Service to a Musician's Legacy

It was somewhat startling to me when I lived in Europe several decades ago that the catchy, upbeat tune "Bobby Brown" would be played regularly on radio. Sure, it's got a good beat and you can dance to it, but,...

Review: SWISS ARMY MAN, A Film Unlike Any Other

What do you want from the world of independent cinema? Well, ideally you'd like a story told without the overt constraints of market, where filmmakers can tell a tale to a wide enough audience that appreciates without sacrificing to the...

Review: THE NEON DEMON, Beauty Is Fleeting

If beauty is fleeting, is there anything more precious than protecting it while it lasts? If all you have going for yourself is the outer shell, to what lengths would you go to in order to keep your specialness? Does...

Interview: Anton Yelchin on GREEN ROOM, STAR TREK, Hardcore Punk & Softcore Porn

Getting to interview filmmakers and actors can sometimes be quite a thrill, sometimes a surprising dud. The fluctuation in quality is sometimes disheartening, when people you’d like to think of in glowing terms give pat answers honed by years of...

Cannes 2016 Review: THE BFG Showcases Steven Spielberg's Infectious Sense Of Play

Once upon a time Steven Spielberg was the fabulist of our time. Looking at Close Encounters or E.T. or even Jurassic Park and A.I., you could see a sense of wonder and playfulness in his filmmaking, a childlike enthusiasm that...

Cannes 2016 Review: PATERSON, Jim Jarmusch's Latest Journey

A driver named Paterson in a town called Paterson played by a man named Driver - the rhyming seems almost too perfect. Yet Jim Jarmuch's latest, a delicate, poetic, often delightful musing on creativity and the art of listening is...

Cannes 2016 Review: Jeff Nichols' LOVING Is A Minor Key Masterpiece

There may be no more subtle, beautiful and accomplished film this year than Jeff Nichols' Loving. There might also be no film more in need of help being championed, a work surely going to be stampeded in a year where...

Cannes 2016 Review: ELLE, A Sordid, Provocative Masterwork

Paul Verhoeven is one of the more unique directors in cinema history. As perhaps the most famous Dutch auteur, he's gone from ribald little European films to the biggest of Hollywood bangs, incorporating his unique wit, visual sense and narrative...

Cannes 2016 Review: THE NEON DEMON, A Dark, Seductive Symphony

If beauty is fleeting, is there anything more precious than protecting it while it lasts? If all you have going for yourself is the outer shell, to what lengths would you go to in order to keep your specialness? Does...

Cannes 2016 Review: THE NICE GUYS, A Trifle With Great Chemistry

"I'm getting too old for this shit". Immortal lines of cinematic splendour, words so titanic that if the scribe of Lethal Weapon had only been responsible for these, then he'd be legendary. Yet Shane Black has done more than write...

Cannes 2016 Review: CLOSE ENCOUNTERS WITH VILMOS ZSIGMOND, A Sparkling Tribute

From the opening shot where the subject is adjusting the lighting, tweaking the seating height, futzing with back illumination and checking the camera's gamma, you know that Close Encounters With Vilmos Zsigmond is not an everyday documentary. But Vilmos...

Cannes 2016 Review: Woody Allen Visits CAFÉ SOCIETY

You ever see the Woody Allen film about the older man who’s in love with a younger woman, only to have her torn between her affection for another nebbishy guy? Sure it’s fair to say that Allen’s treading on familiar...

Review: THE LOBSTER Loses Its Way

Boy, I wanted to love this movie. Really, I did. I mean, the first shot of the film is a delight: a woman is passively driving in a car. She gets out, windshield wipers still flailing away, and pulls out...