Festivals: New York Film Fest Reviews

Sort By
From The
Editors
Everything From
Everyone
Most
Loved
Most
Hated
What The
Hell?!

New York 2017 Review: LADY BIRD Emerges

What separates Lady Bird from other exemplary entries into the beloved coming of age genre, besides its superficial differences, is the personality and layered nuance that Gerwig offers her craft, allowing for an experience that feels fresh in the face of every cliché it transcends.

New York 2017 Review: WONDERSTRUCK, Why We Go to the Movies

“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.” -Oscar Wilde If we were to conduct a poll of all of our writers’ and readers’ favorite live-action kids movies – and I really think...

New York 2017 Review: LET THE SUN SHINE IN, Claire Denis Goes Hong Sang-soo

I think Claire Denis has been hanging out with Hong Sang-soo a little too much because I never expected her to do a wordy romantic comedy! And the result is delightful! It boasts the best rolling end credit of any movie ever.

New York 2017 Review: THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE, Syrian Refugee Crisis, Aki Kaurismaki Style

Extremely silly and endlessly charming, The Other Side of Hope reminds us that the complicated world we are living in doesn't need to be complicated. Through the Kaurismakian glass, the world is filled with decent people and it remains a hopeful place as long as people help each other out.

New York 2017 Review: In FELICITE, a Glimpse of a Modern Woman's Life in Kinshasa

Félicité is not another downbeat film about Africa steeped in miserablist tendencies. Gomis and company don't lose the sight of happiness in the daily lives of its ordinary citizens. There is much humanism and culture and joy to be had in Félicité and I am grateful for it.

New York 2017 Review: Lucrecia Martel's ZAMA Is the Cinematic Highlight of the Year

Finding the Latin American identity, as European settlers and their offspring, has been the continuous source for great literature over 300 years. Throw in the idea of class, masculinity, racism, sense of belonging, you get a very complex picture of what makes up the theme of Zama.

New York 2017 Review: THE FLORIDA PROJECT, A Stunning Work of Authenticity and Humanism

As with Tangerine, Baker uses mostly untrained non-actors to portray people on the skid and just have them run with the materials they were given. The result is a stunning work of authenticity, brimming with humor, heartache and much humanism.

New York 2017 Review: Isabelle Huppert Schools Us in MRS. HYDE

I didn't expect a biting, timely social commentary from Bozon and from Mrs.Hyde. Unlike Robert Louis Stevenson's Jekyll and Hyde, Bozon's two faced, mild mannered school teacher parable has a lot more to do with the society we live in - which lacks self-determination, individual thoughts, and honestly, is more and more very much anti-intellectual.

New York 2016 Review: James Gray's THE LOST CITY OF Z, A Well-Meaning But Lackluster Adventure Film

There is nothing particularly wrong with The Lost City of Z. I buy that one man's obsession- 'a man's reach should exceed his grasp', is worthy subject for a movie. Obviously, it's much less offensive than that last Indiana Jones film or Apocalypto when the depiction of natives are concerned. But do we need another film about a white man's journey to validate another culture's worth in this day and age?

New York 2016 Review: With CERTAIN WOMEN, Kelly Reichardt's Back in Form

If her newly restored/rediscovered debut film Rivers of Grass gave a nod to Bonnie and Clyde and old noir films, with Certain Women, Reichardt does Altman-- an ensemble cast and loosely connected stories structure based on short stories (by a Montana Native, Maile Meloy). But it's still very much Reichardt film: with muted tones, sense of melancholy and loneliness, Certain Women excels at being small, minimalistic character studies that are distinctly a small town Americana. Also, many of her films placed women in precarious situations to observe, but I think this is the first time that she is forefront about exclusively telling women's stories.

New York 2016 Review: In Albert Serra's THE DEATH OF LOUIS XIV, Irony is Not Lost

The irony of the king's death is heightened by it's straightforward presentation and procedural approach. The Death of Louis XIV is a very singular formalist filmmaking in its highest order.

New York 2016 Review: HERMIA & HELENA, Matías Piñeiro's New Offering is Slow in Tempo But Just as Beguiling

Just like his other films, H & H is extremely talky, but the feel of the film is much slower even languid at times. It's not more contemplative, per se. Perhaps it's New York's snowy winter landscape that's bringing out certain melancholy to the film. Because of Camila's journey takes unexpected turns (in romance or otherwise) and because of the people she meets and we get to see her (sort of) motives, the film comes closer to a character study and feels more personal than any other Piñeiro films I've seen.

New York 2016 Review: AQUARIUS Explores Indiscreet Charm of Brazilian Bourgeoisie

With Braga's commanding performance and the quite explosive ending, Aquarius goes down as one of the finest films of 2016.

New York 2016 Review: FIRE AT SEA, Juxtaposition of the Refugee Crisis and Old Europe

Fire at Sea refuses to be a rhetorical documentary. There are no narrations nor sit down interviews with locals or 'experts' about how they feel about the tides of Immigrants coming ashore or what could be done about it. It is more of a straight up reportage on the ground, simply showing the magnitude of the crisis that begs your attention and understanding.

Toronto 2016 Review: THINGS TO COME Ponders the Wilderness of Self with Supreme Gentleness

French filmmaker Mia Hansen-Løve teams up with iconic actress Isabelle Huppert for a quietly affecting story about a bourgeois middle-aged philosophy teacher and the big changes in her life.

New York 2015 Review: BRIDGE OF SPIES, A Thrilling Throwback To An Earlier Era

The New York Film Festival's transition in the past few years from being more or less purely a showcase for the crème-de-la-crème of world cinema (which it still largely is) to being an increasingly prominent stop on the way to...

New York 2015 Review: Getting To Know DE PALMA's Rabbit

Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow's documentary, De Palma, begins with its beloved subject discussing the first time he ever saw Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo and the profound impact it had on his sense of storytelling and general cinematic philosophy. In discussing...

New York 2015 Review: The Tranquil Insanity of JUNUN

Paul Thomas Anderson has finally given the world a film that won't send its audiences into fits of over-thought analysis. By no means is this meant to imply that ruminating on PTA films isn't a source of great cinematic joy,...

New York 2015 Review: MIA MADRE Is An Elegant And Deeply Personal Film

Nanni Moretti's latest film, Mia Madre, is elegant, understated, and discreetly moving. A personal, if not autobiographical film, Mia Madre chronicles the slow death of a filmmaker's mother as the director struggles to complete her movie. Moretti experienced the hospitalization...

New York 2015 Review: STEVE JOBS Is A Dud

The first question is: do we really need another Steve Jobs movie? Then, what merits does the life of the billionaire co-founder of Apple have, to prompt three movies (Jobs, Steve Jobs: the Man in the Machine, and now Steve...