Tag: criterion

Blu-ray Review: MARTIN SCORSESE'S WORLD CINEMA PROJECT VOL. 2, A Trip Worth Taking

Nearly five years after Criterion released Martin Scorsese's World Cinema Project Volume One, an impressive box set of six films from around the world, we finally have its first follow up, Volume Two. Like the first volume in both packaging,...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Explores Clowes and Zwigoff's GHOST WORLD

It’s often difficult to review Criterion releases, because it tends to involve putting into words your feelings about your ‘favorite movie’. This term, when spoken by me, doesn’t hold much weight among my friends, more so, groans and eye rolls...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's TAMPOPO Will Make You Hungry

Make sure your noodle-wrangling skills are on point before spinning up this delicious disc.

Blu-ray Review: THE TREE OF WOODEN CLOGS, Far From a Wooden Slog

"I'm going to find a tree to chop down." That line, perhaps familiar from another film released by Criterion, Moonrise Kingdom, also applies to this new release by the company, respected Italian director Ermanno Olmi's 1978 Palme D'or winner, The...

Criterion in May 2017: GHOST WORLD, Scorsese's World Cinema Project and More

It's all about the world in May for the Criterion Collection. The company announced their lineup for the month and two titles jumped out at me. Terry Zwigoff's Ghost World is a movie I watched on multiple occasions years ago,...

Blu-ray Review: HIS GIRL FRIDAY From Criterion Is Black and White and Read All Over

Trumpeted even today, well beyond its 75th anniversary, Howard Hawks' 1940 newspaper-centric screwball comedy is an undeniable keeper.  It’s also warped and batty with something of a dark streak. People throw themselves out of windows, morbidity that doesn’t stop the...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Goes Far With FEDERICO FELLINI'S ROMA

When it comes to Federico Fellini's Roma, it's difficult to determine what's more self-indulgent, the act of appropriating by name a vital, ancient city that's been on the global forefront of politics, religion and culture, or this entire film in...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's PUNCH-DRUNK LOVE Proves a Healthy Choice

Breezy yet tight, severe but affecting, Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch-Drunk Love is the confounding genius' mini masterpiece.   Shot through with affection and pathos to spare, the fact that the entire picture wears its sensitivities on its sleeves benefits the...

Criterion in January 2017: HIS GIRL FRIDAY, FOX AND HIS FRIENDS, SOMETHING WILD, BLACK GIRL

Criterion will begin the new year by releasing four films, one from the 1940s, two from the 60s and one from the 70s. His Girl Friday leads the pack, and it's an interesting choice for a company known for its...

Now on Blu-ray: VALLEY OF THE DOLLS and BEYOND, The American Dream Melts Into Psychedelic Mush On Criterion Blu

Brand new from the Criterion Collection this month is a pair of whacked out features that chronicle the decay of the American Dream in glorious high definition. Mark Robson's Valley of the Dolls is an adaptation of Jaqueline Suzanne's best...

Blu-ray Review: CAT PEOPLE, Subtle and Stunning, All Over Again

Shadows, shadows, and more shadows. Shadows are everywhere in Cat People (1942), and the first time I saw it, I thought it was an imaginative way to disguise its low-budget production. So it is, but it's also far more than...

Blu-ray Review: Mizoguchi's THE STORY OF THE LAST CHRYSANTHEMUM Takes Root with Criterion

What's so special about a chrysanthemum? The ubiquitous flower comes in hundreds of forms and represents many things across most major cultures. It's a perfectly agreeable flower, and as common as the day is long. When, exactly, would a chrysanthemum...

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's WOMAN IN THE DUNES

The Criterion Collection have just released 1964's Woman in the Dunes (Suna no onna), which was --- and is --- heralded as one of the art house films of the 1960s. As a result, Teshigahara earn an Academy Award nomination for...

Criterion in November 2016: LONE WOLF AND CUB, PUNCH-DRUNK LOVE, ONE-EYED JACKS and More

Ah, November. Here in North America, the weather cools off, critically-acclaimed movies flood the theaters (in some cities) and Criterion delivers some tasty titles. The bounty begins with the classic Lone Wolf and Cub series, which combines an assassin and...

Criterion Roundup: PHOENIX, FANTASTIC PLANET and THE IN-LAWS

Suspense, belly-laughs and a jaw-dropping bit of adult oriented animation round this series of Criterion Collection reviews. I highly recommend them all.   In April the label released an edition of Phoenix (2014) a film which was nominated for, and...

Criterion in October 2016: A Feast of Guillermo del Toro, Euro Classics, BOYHOOD and SHORT CUTS

Debuting ten years ago, Pan's Labyrinth remains a gorgeous, haunting masterpiece, the best film Guillermo del Toro has directed so far. In October, it will be added to the Criterion Collection with a newly graded 2K digital master and new...

Blu-ray Review: CARNIVAL OF SOULS, Still a Puzzling, Creepy Ride

Herk Harvey's Carnival of Souls is a weird little movie. Made in 1962 for about $30,000, Carnival of Souls is one of the creepiest films of the early '60s, and not entirely on purpose. The film was shot by Harvey...

Blu-ray Review: CLOUDS OF SILS MARIA is a Misty New Classic

Though known principally for restoring and presenting classics of cinema for home video, The Criterion Collection's mission doesn't preclude occasionally pumping out a contemporary release with just as much thought and consideration. Such a release is Olivier Assayas' 2014 film...

Blu-ray Review: HERE COMES MR. JORDAN, A Heavenly Addition To The Criterion Collection

Part screwball comedy, part supernatural mystery, and part fable, Alexander Hall's Here Comes Mr. Jordan is one of the most enduring films of Hollywood's golden age between the Great Depression and the emergence of the new Hollywood in the '50s....

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's LE AMICHE Displays Early Antonioni

When one considers the work of Michelangelo Antonioni, the terms "crackling pace" and "dialogue heavy" likely do not spring to mind. Yet, both apply quite prominently to the director's 1955 female-centric drama, Le amiche (The Girlfriends). Within five short years...