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Review: KALEIDOSCOPE Is Beautiful and Fragmented

Lots of mentally fragile guys are obsessed with their mothers, especially when it comes to cinematic tropes. Of course, there's Psycho, a giant of a film and a close cousin to Rupert Jones' debut feature, Kaleidoscope. Out today on VOD...

Blu-ray Review: Terry Gilliam's JABBERWOCKY on Criterion, Vital, Promising, More Quirky Than Funny

Surprise! The delightful, self-deprecating audio commentary by Terry Gilliam and Michael Palin is what sold me on Jabberwocky, a very British film loosely inspired by Lewis Carroll's poem. Released in the U.K. and the U.S. in April 1977 -- two...

Blu-ray Review: RED CHRISTMAS Kills

I first saw Red Christmas at Fantasia in 2016, and then again in September 2017 at the Horrible Imaginings Film Festival. Star Dee Wallace (Cujo, E.T.) was in attendance at both festivals, but it was at HIFF where she gave an impassioned...

Review: JUNGLE, Daniel Radcliffe Gets Lost

First comes sheer human panic, then the growl of a wild animal. Seeking change in his life after completing three years of service in the Israeli Navy, Yossi Ghinsberg (Daniel Radcliffe) ends up in Bolivia, South America, in search of...

Review: THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER, Strange, Cold and Horrifying

Human beings can be kind, generous, and loving. But they can also be self-indulgent, vicious, and cruel. We all want to believe that, under certain circumstances, we would sacrifice and fight for the lives of our loved ones. But would...

Fantastic Fest 2017 Review: TOP KNOT DETECTIVE, Japan's Greatest TV Show That Never Existed

Just to be up front, I am generally a fan of media based mockumentaries, and Aaron McCann and Dominic Pearce's Top Knot Detective is one of the best and funniest examples of the form in a while. The film explores...

Fantastic Fest 2017 Review: PIN CUSHION, The Heartbreak of Bullying

Some people like to say that bullies really just hate themselves. That might be true of many, but not of all; some people are just mean, and enjoying being mean to others to give themselves power, or because they get...

Blu-ray Review: THE DEVIL'S CANDY Continues to Rock

Out today on Blu-ray and DVD from Scream Factory, The Devil's Candy, is Sean Byrne's hard-rocking horror flick. You may have seen that we've given a lot of support to this film, and that's simply because it's awesome. You can read Todd's...

Blu-ray Review: A DARK SONG Soars

Scream Factory is an awesome imprint and they show no signs of slowing down with their superb releases. To that end, the horror distribution arm of Shout! Factory has recently released the festival hit A Dark Song, which toured the circuit...

Venice 2017 Review: Martin McDonagh Triumphs Again With THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI

In Bruges director Martin McDonagh has laid down what could be the first real winning hand at the 74th Biennale with Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, and whilst there's definitely still time for someone else to clinch this year's Golden Lion,...

Review: In ENGLAND IS MINE, Is It Really So Strange That This Charming Man Is Unloveable?

For over three decades Steven Patrick Morrissey has been one of the most controversial and enigmatic characters in pop culture. A singer-songwriter with an affinity for sarcasm and a vehement distaste for pretty much everything life has to offer, Moz...

Blu-ray Review: Mike Leigh's MEANTIME, A Well-Timed Criterion Release

One of many, many, many films I'd never heard of before Criterion sought to add it to their numbers (number 890 in this case), Mike Leigh's 1984 TV movie Meantime comes across as an unintentional political statement. It pulls us...

Melbourne 2017 Review: RABBIT Falls Down a Meandering Yet Mesmerizing Hole

Luke’s Shanahan’s twisted twin sci-fi thriller Rabbit is a bold and confident debut feature with wonderfully detailed small moments and plot twists that recall some of the best in psychological horror. The film has a focused idea of how it...

Fantasia 2017 Short Film Short Review: TRANSMISSION

Transmission opens with a selection of provocative, disturbing and benign images, a tip of the hat to classical conditioning or aversion therapy. The audience is being prepped for the story. Then the Radetzky March, OP 288 from Johann Strauss Sr....

Fantasia 2017: Born Of Woman Shorts Programme Highlights a Trio of Haunting Standouts

For its second year at Fantasia, the theme running across the curation for the shorts programme Born Of Woman has moved away from the cerebral physical fetishes, and queer emotional landscapes of last year, towards the nature of haunting. The highlights were...

Review: KILLING GROUND, Halfway to a Disturbing Classic

I love horror movies that are disquieting and suspenseful. I hate horror movies that traffic in sheer cruelty and stupidity. So I love the first half of Killing Ground. Sam (Harriet Dyer) and Ian (Ian Meadows) are the prototypical romantic...

Review: DUNKIRK, Nolan Styles Overwrought War Epic

After a slew of tired franchise entries and superhero tentpoles, the summer finally delivers a truly essential big screen experience. Austere and nerve-racking, Christopher Nolan's Dunkirk is a bold big-screen gamble that employs an experimental structure and little in the...

Short Film Short Review: THE SUMMONER Punching Ghosts to an Electronic Beat

James Secker’s short film The Summoner introduces us to a world where the spirit world can be very invasive. When this happens the public can call upon The Summoner and he will come and clean your home. Think Tangina Barrons...

Review: LADY MACBETH, An Exhilarating and Timely Tale of a Survivalist Woman

Exquisitely acted, framed and paced, William Oldroyd's Lady Macbeth is perhaps the most accomplished debut feature I've seen in years. Based on Nicolai Lestov's Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk District, a 19th century Russian novel which was adapted and scripted by...

Review: CHURCHILL, Roaring Like a Lion

Years of warfare have taken their toll on the old lion. Beginning one week before D-Day is set to launch in June 1944, Churchill finds the British Prime Minister (and Minister of Defence) haunted by an epic military failure during...