International: UK, NZ & Australia Reviews

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Review: OUR KIND OF TRAITOR, Slick Yet Simple Spycraft

Veteran screen adapter Hossein Amini (The Two Faces of January, Drive) teams up with famed author John le Carré for yet another big screen espionage thriller joint with Our Kind of Traitor. Le Carré, who serves as executive producer, brings...

Review: HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE, Funny and Heartfelt

Taika Waititi can do no wrong. From his wonderful short films to his features, and through his work on the hilarious TV show Flight of the Conchords, all of his efforts have been pitch perfect. Yet because of his last...

Review: TICKLED, A Deeply Engaging Ride-Along

Tickled is a documentary about power when one is the 'tickler'. Tickled is a documentary about the sudden whiplash from silly to terror when one is the 'ticklee'. Tickled is David Farrier's investigative reporting magnum opus, a deeply engaging ride-along...

Review: GENIUS, A Theatrical Pageant That Goes Terribly Wrong

Elvis Costello famously quipped, "writing about music is like dancing about architecture", and while I hardly agree with the overall sentiment -- if I did, I wouldn't exactly be doing this -- his point is well taken. Success in one...

Rooftop Films 2016 Review: "This is What We Mean By Short Films," A Wealth of Miniature Gems

Rooftop Films Summer Series 2016 got off to a great start with their opening night presentation, “This is What We Mean By Short Films,” an eclectic and incredibly accomplished selection of shorts, some of which had their New York premieres...

Review: THE ONES BELOW, Beware The Kindness Of Neighbors

Properly moody, The Ones Below brews up a strong cup of neighborly paranoia. It's a familiar story. Kate (Clémence Poésy) and Justin (Stephen Campbell Moore) live in a lovely flat in a lovely building in a lovely London suburb. Kate...

Review: SUNSET SONG, An Impeccable Masterpiece From Director Terence Davies

A sweeping tale of changing times in Scotland in the early 20th century, Terence Davies's new film Sunset Song centers around a farm girl Chris Guthrie (Agyness Deyn) in the fictional rural town of Kinraddie near Aberdeen. Chris is a thoroughly...

Review: HIGH-RISE, A Provocation To Disengage

As audience empathy tests go, killing the dog is perhaps the most capital of movie-crimes. Here it is gleefully committed in the opening minutes; a bellwether for the casually curious to beware.    Several other canine-murders are peppered throughout the...

Review: Kurosawa's RAN, 4K Restoration DVD/Blu-ray Release

One morning, several years ago, I finished an interview with a documentary filmmaker at a little café within the cavernous underground of the Tokyo train station. The political nature of the film, combined with the fact the station was on...

Hot Docs 2016 Review: TICKLED, A Tale From Which It Is Difficult To Squirm Away

Tickled is a documentary about power when one is the 'tickler'. Tickled is a documentary about the sudden whiplash from silly to terror when one is the 'ticklee'. Tickled is David Farrier's investigative reporting magnum opus, a deeply engaging ride-along...

TIFF Kids 2016: The Kids Review ODDBALL

ScreenAnarchy's tiniest film critics return to cover the TIFF Kids Film Festival, currently running from April 8 - 24th in Toronto, the children's arm of the Toronto International Film Festival group.     Willem (age 13) and Miranda (age 11) have...

Blu-ray Review: Chen Kaige's FAREWELL MY CONCUBINE From The BFI

For many mainstream filmgoers, Farewell My Concubine is perhaps the best-known Chinese language film of the 1990s, helped in no end by its success at the Cannes Film Festival. Directed by Chen Kaige (Yellow Earth, Temptress Moon), the film traces...

Review: THE PROGRAM Portrays Lance Armstrong As A Fascinating Liar

British filmmaker Stephen Frears is no stranger to bringing a controversial and highly publicized real life case to the big screen. With both The Queen and The Program, Frears explores how much the reality of an influential figure can differ...

Review: NINA FOREVER, Blood And Sex In A Droll Relationship Drama

I had a university professor (English literature) who was fond of saying, "Nobody walks away happy from a threeway." I wonder what he would have to say about the Blaine Brothers' Nina Forever, a dark but droll relationship drama that...

Rotterdam 2016 Review: HISTORY'S FUTURE, A Shower Of Innumerable Atoms

There are few film festivals that manage to be as bold a stage for daring types of film as International Film Festival Rotterdam, and sometimes it almost feels as if there's something hard-wired into that city's forward-looking architecture that compels...

Review: PARTISAN, A Chilling Take On Coming Of Age

Under the diligent guidance of institutions like Screen Australia, Australia seems to have become a very promising country for new emerging directors, and Ariel Kleiman is no exception. Within seconds of his uncompromising first feature's opening, it soon becomes apparent...

Short Film, Short Review: Something Lurks Behind That Door In AGRAVOY

A lone figure stalks back and forth in a dilapidated apartment. Through peepholes he watches the woman next door engage with a new male tenant on the same floor. Jealousy boils over and the true nature of their relationship comes...

Sitges 2015 Review: FROM THE DARK Is An Enjoyable, If Repetitive, Ride

Conor McMahon is no stranger here in Sitges. The Irish director already succeeded in winning the audience's affection back in 2012 with Stitches, a film that managed to get as much laughter as jumps and scares. This time he comes back to Sitges with...

Toronto 2015 Review: SHERPA Scales A Different Side of Everest

On May 29th,1953, Nepalese guide Tenzing Norgay brought New Zealand philanthropist mountaineer Edmund Hillary to the summit of Mount Everest. The very idea of crawling to the top of the highest mountain on earth, with its punishing temperatures and near...

Toronto 2015 Review: EYE IN THE SKY, A Complex And Darkly Funny Look At The War On Terror

Tsotsi and Rendition director Gavin Hood has set himself a difficult task on multiple levels with his latest effort, Eye In The Sky. He is, first of all, tackling fabulously thorny and morally complex material as he weighs the question...