Festivals: Sundance Reviews

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Sundance 2017 Review: CALL ME BY YOUR NAME Feels Both Fresh and Vintage

The word “sumptuous” doesn’t get bandied about very much during Sundance when describing films. In the land of ice and snow, things are either “quirky”, “dramadies” or “depressing as shit”, but they’re seldom languid, or bucolic. Perhaps that’s what elevated...

Sundance 2017 Review: Damn Those Unbearably Funny L.A. TIMES

L.A. Times plays like the flipside of the coin that is Whit Stillman’s aristocratic male-centric New York, where snoots court debutantes and intellectualize feeling superior. In writer/director/star, Michelle Morgan’s West Coast, a group of friends attempt to find love, happiness,...

Sundance 2017: BLACK HOLES Is A Gloriously Stylish Animated Oddity

Short film programs at major film festivals are a tricky animal, always struggling to draw attention away from the longer form material on display. And yet for those who dip in there are some absolute gems to find. And Laurent...

Sundance 2017 Review: THE BIG SICK Offers Real Feels

Whenever The Simpsons offered moments of unexpectedly touching sweetness, the writers would refer to these moments as "Jimmys", as in, show runner James L. Brooks, who enjoyed providing the family with bouts of humanity. Walking the line of comedy and...

Sundance 2017 Review: BUSHWICK, A Provocative and Chilling Picture of America in Crisis

Ever since I saw Cooties in 2014 and fought with our founding editor in order to review the film (I lost out, of course) I’ve been anxious to see how Cary Murnion and Jonathan Milott would follow up on their...

Sundance 2017 Review: WILSON, Fortitude of a Gregarious Curmudgeon

Ever since Wilson’s father passed away, he’s been feeling more lost than usual. The strangers he attempts to befriend, scene after scene, are no consolation as most people are suspicious of talkative types who behave too friendly too quickly. It’s...

Sundance 2017 Review: XX, Female-Helmed Horror Anthology Totally Rocks

Horror anthologies have been a big draw in the film world as long as there have been scary stories to tell, but it seems we've been a bit spoiled in recent years, with many of today's most interesting horror directors...

Sundance 2017 Review: I DON'T FEEL AT HOME IN THIS WORLD ANYMORE, One Hell of a Ride

Most of us met Macon Blair onscreen as a the bearded, disheveled lead of Blue Ruin. Homeless and hapless, the character soon evolved into one of the more startling and indelible in indie cinema, a bravado performance that justifiably gained...

Sundance 2016: The Best Of The Shorts Programs

Jeremy and I didn't get to see as many short films as we would have liked to, but of the short programs we were fortunate to catch, the following films resonated as our favorites....

Sundance 2016 Review: WE ARE X, The Not-Rock Doc

From director Stephen Kijak, best known for his documentary about the Rolling Stones, Stones in Exile comes We Are X which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this year. It is an excellent record of the history of X Japan,...

Sundance 2016 Review: BRAHMAN NAMAN Is A Fantastic Farce

One does not typically see raunchy, teen sex comedies coming out of India, which is precisely why acclaimed director Qaushiq Mukherjee, known simply as "Q" set out to make such a movie. After his acclaimed film Gandu became controversial in...

Sundance 2016: New Frontier VR Round-Up

There is no doubt that we are right on the doorstep of the era of Virtual Reality. But VR has been a mainstay of the Sundance Film Festival for a number of years now. In particular, the New Frontier section...

Sundance 2016 Review: SPA NIGHT, A Quietly Striking And Mature Debut

Much like its lead, articulation has failed me in the days since watching and processing Andrew Ahn's glorious Spa Night. The film presents itself with such ease and confidence that its easy to miss its complexities at first glance. A...

Sundance 2016 Review: THE FITS, Or Maybe All Girls Are Magic

What makes a black girl fly? Is it her magic-- the frightful inheritance of her sex? Or is it illusory? (the shape of their hips in blue and gold sequins...) What makes a black girl fly? Is it her fear...

Sundance 2016 Review: GLEASON Is An Emotional Triumph

Clay Tweel has been involved in some of the most entertaining documentaries in recent years including his producing role in The King of Kong, right up through his directing turn on both Print the Legend and last year's brilliantly witty...

Sundance 2016 Review: DARK NIGHT, Scenes From The New American Apocalypse

Close your eyes. Picture the scenes: You gotta keep your head down. She runs her hands through your hair; it's so short it must feel like walking barefoot on freshly cut grass. The burnt orange dye bleeds into your scalp....

Sundance 2016 Review: HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE, An Adventure Worth Taking

Taika Waititi can do no wrong. From his wonderful short films to his features, and through his work on the hilarious TV show Flight of the Conchords, all of his efforts have been pitch perfect. Yet because of his last...

Sundance 2016 Review: NEWTOWN, A Simple Tale Of Universal Grief

The horror of what took place on December 14, 2012 at Sandy Hook elementary school captured the world's attention. A young man, armed with an assault rifle, handgun and plenty of ammunition, walked through his old school and butchered...

Sundance 2016 Review: CHRISTINE, A Report On The Art Of Self-Destruction

Performance>Perfection>Breakdown.

No. That's not right. Run the film again. What do we see: A woman in her late twenties, dark hair, big eyes, tall; walking down the halls of a TV station. Take the splicer to the footage. Chop it in...

Sundance 2016 Review: EAT THAT QUESTION: FRANK ZAPPA IN HIS OWN WORDS, A Highly Entertaining Look

It was somewhat startling to me when I lived in Europe several decades ago that the catchy, upbeat tune "Bobby Brown" would be played regularly on radio. Sure, it's got a good beat and you can dance to it,...