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Notes on Streaming: THE NEW LEGENDS OF MONKEY Childishly Delights

Inspired by the Japanese television drama Monkey (1978-80), which in turn was based on the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West, the Netflix series The New Legends of Monkey starts off with a lot of cultural baggage, which it...

Tribeca 2018 Dispatch: The Many Pleasures of Horror

Perhaps not every horror fan will confess this, but we’re not always looking for masterpieces, or even movies that we’d recommend wholeheartedly. Instead, it’s all about moments and ideas, preferably ones that reflect the whole of the filmmaker’s heart and...

Tribeca 2018 Preview: Ten Notable Fest Selections

The 17th edition of the Tribeca Film Festival, running through April 29, is once again packed with films, talks, and moving image work beyond film such as VR, television, online work, and gaming events. The opening film is Lisa D'Apolito's Love,...

Friday One Sheet: YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

Three colour, simple, and bloody, this is one of several pieces of key art for Lynne Ramsay's take on Taxi Driver, featuring Joaquin Phoenix, which at one point was called A Beautiful Day, but will be released as You Were Never...

10+ Years Later: THE PRESTIGE, Christopher Nolan's Most Knotty Work

"In my travels, I have seen the future... And it is a strange future indeed. The world, ladies and gentleman, is on the brink of new, terrifying possibilities." This is how Robert Angier, introduces his magic act, 'The Real Transported...

ScreenAnarchy's Favourite Films of 2017

Another year over, and what an annus horribilis it proved to be in so many ways. But away from the political atrocities that took place in pretty much every country you care to mention, and the sexual harassment scandals that...

DOC NYC 2017: Six Must-See Selections

DOC NYC, the largest documentary featival in the US, returns for its 8th edition, running from November 9-16, and screening at IFC Center, SVA Theatre, and Cinepolis Chelsea. This year's slate includes well over 100 features, and includes new works...

10+ Years Later: 28 WEEKS LATER Has A Fierce Bite

I do not quite recall the mood around 28 Weeks Later upon its 2007 release. I remember the wonderful “Maintain The Quarantine” poster, and that the production was financed at the full flush of Fox Atomic, 20th Century Fox’s ill-fated...

Preview: Margaret Mead 2017 "Activates" Cross-Cultural Connection

The Margaret Mead Film Festival, the premier showcase for documentary films in New York, returns for its 41st edition, screening at the American Museum of Natural History from Oct. 19-22. This year's typically impressive slate consists of 29 feature films and 12...

10+ Years Later: CODE 46 Showed Us That We Are All Replicants

With a new Blade Runner film on the way later this year, it seems an appropriate time to revisit a certain overlooked 2003 film that is as close to a prequel to Ridley Scott's seminal clone-noir as there ever was....

70s Rewind: ZARDOZ, Much More Than Sean Connery Running Around in a Loincloth

James Bond running around in a loincloth. That may be the singular image that comes to mind when Zardoz is mentioned. If another image pops, it's likely "giant statue of a head flying through the air." Out of context, the...

AnarchyVision: TRAINSPOTTING 2, GOON 2 and BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Two sequels and a remake (aka, new normal) yet still some surprises this week - a look at Disney's live action Beauty and the Beast, T2: Trainspotting and Goon: Last of the Enforcers....

10+ Years Later: SUNSHINE Is Still Waiting For The Light

With Danny Boyle's forthcoming revisit of the world of Edinburgh junkies, lowlifes and dropouts twenty years on, it would seem fitting that we have a look at Trainspotting (1996) and where it stands in the culture 20 years on. But we...

70s Rewind: ROYAL FLASH, Richard Lester's Comic 19th Century Adventure

Recently I watched Richard Lester's Royal Flash (1975), starring Malcolm McDowell, for the first time. Adapted by author George MacDonald Fraser from his own novel, it's a broad and sprightly comic adventure that I thoroughly enjoyed. To be frank, I...

Slamdance 2017 Preview: ScreenAnarchy's Top Picks

Touted as the festival "for filmmakers by filmmakers", the 23rd Annual Slamdance Film Festical kicks off Friday Jaunary 20th at the Treasure Mountain Inn in Park City, Utah. A stone's throw away from the hustle and bustle of Sundance, Slamdance...

ScreenAnarchy's Top 10 Movies of 2016

This year, 23 Screen Anarchists from 11 countries around the globe shared with us 129 films for consideration in our collective top ten movies of 2016. Our criteria was simple: an individual contributor could include a film on their ballot...

Brooklyn Horror Film Festival: ScreenAnarchy's Top Picks

The sign of a great horror film fest is not how many of the best, or soon-to-be best-known, horror flicks it screens, but how it encompasses the wide, wild world of horror—so few venues of any sort attempt that, let...

Parenting in the Film Industry: Raising Films' Survey Yields Sadly Unsurprising Results

Two years ago, I interviewed director Liv Corfixen on her film My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn, about her husband and the making of Only God Forgives. Refn was there as well, and one of the points that had...

Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: Sydney Pollack's THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR

James Grady’s novel Six Days Of The Condor was published just a year before Sydney Pollack’s big-screen adaptation, and yet almost every aspect of the story was changed. It is difficult to imagine such a flagrant disregard for the source...

Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: Samuel Fuller's FIXED BAYONETS!

Released in 1952, Fixed Bayonets! marked the first studio picture directed by Samuel Fuller, and his second in a row that would depict the still-in-progress Korean War. After the surprise success of the independently produced The Steel Helmet, Fuller met...