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70s Rewind: ZARDOZ, Much More Than Sean Connery Running Around in a Loincloth

James Bond running around in a loincloth. That may be the singular image that comes to mind when Zardoz is mentioned. If another image pops, it's likely "giant statue of a head flying through the air." Out of context, the...

AnarchyVision: TRAINSPOTTING 2, GOON 2 and BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Two sequels and a remake (aka, new normal) yet still some surprises this week - a look at Disney's live action Beauty and the Beast, T2: Trainspotting and Goon: Last of the Enforcers....

10+ Years Later: SUNSHINE Is Still Waiting For The Light

With Danny Boyle's forthcoming revisit of the world of Edinburgh junkies, lowlifes and dropouts twenty years on, it would seem fitting that we have a look at Trainspotting (1996) and where it stands in the culture 20 years on. But we...

70s Rewind: ROYAL FLASH, Richard Lester's Comic 19th Century Adventure

Recently I watched Richard Lester's Royal Flash (1975), starring Malcolm McDowell, for the first time. Adapted by author George MacDonald Fraser from his own novel, it's a broad and sprightly comic adventure that I thoroughly enjoyed. To be frank, I...

Slamdance 2017 Preview: ScreenAnarchy's Top Picks

Touted as the festival "for filmmakers by filmmakers", the 23rd Annual Slamdance Film Festical kicks off Friday Jaunary 20th at the Treasure Mountain Inn in Park City, Utah. A stone's throw away from the hustle and bustle of Sundance, Slamdance...

ScreenAnarchy's Top 10 Movies of 2016

This year, 23 Screen Anarchists from 11 countries around the globe shared with us 129 films for consideration in our collective top ten movies of 2016. Our criteria was simple: an individual contributor could include a film on their ballot...

Brooklyn Horror Film Festival: ScreenAnarchy's Top Picks

The sign of a great horror film fest is not how many of the best, or soon-to-be best-known, horror flicks it screens, but how it encompasses the wide, wild world of horror—so few venues of any sort attempt that, let...

Parenting in the Film Industry: Raising Films' Survey Yields Sadly Unsurprising Results

Two years ago, I interviewed director Liv Corfixen on her film My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn, about her husband and the making of Only God Forgives. Refn was there as well, and one of the points that had...

Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: Sydney Pollack's THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR

James Grady’s novel Six Days Of The Condor was published just a year before Sydney Pollack’s big-screen adaptation, and yet almost every aspect of the story was changed. It is difficult to imagine such a flagrant disregard for the source...

Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: Samuel Fuller's FIXED BAYONETS!

Released in 1952, Fixed Bayonets! marked the first studio picture directed by Samuel Fuller, and his second in a row that would depict the still-in-progress Korean War. After the surprise success of the independently produced The Steel Helmet, Fuller met...

Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: King Hu's A TOUCH OF ZEN

Heralded as possibly the greatest martial arts film ever made, King Hu's A Touch Of Zen stands apart from most other films in the wuxia genre. For one thing it runs over three hours long, a rarity among its peers...

J. Hurtado's 10 (ish) Favorite Blu-ray/DVD Releases Of 2015

Okay.Just to be straight with all of you, I'm going to cheat.There is no way I could get this list down to only ten discs, but I think I've managed to whittle it down pretty darned well. So, for those...

Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: King Hu's DRAGON INN

Considered by many to be the architect of wuxia cinema, King Hu was to martial arts was John Ford was to the western. Beginning with his 1966 Shaw Brothers adventure Come Drink With Me, Hu took a pulp genre associated...

70s Rewind: FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE, In Praise Of Modest Frights

As a huge fan of 1970s cinema, it's always tempting to overpraise modestly entertaining movies. For comparison's sake to another decade, witness last week's effusive nostalgia for 1985's Back to the Future II, surely one of the most ghastly, sour...

Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: Samuel Fuller's FORTY GUNS

Known primarily for his war films and crime dramas, American director Samuel Fuller also directed a quartet of westerns, the last of which being 1957's Forty Guns. The film was part of a deal struck with 20th Century Fox after...

The Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Worlds of MAD MAX: FURY ROAD

What will the future look like? In Mad Max: Fury Road, director George Miller and his fabulous team conjure up strikingly distinct landscapes for what is, in essence, a chase movie. Yet it's a chase movie with great empathy for...

Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: Sidney Lumet's THE OFFENCE

It is no secret that Sean Connery grew to hate James Bond long before he stopped playing the character. In fact, he was so reluctant to return as 007 for Diamonds Are Forever, after George Lazenby walked away from the...

Tribeca 2015: ScreenAnarchy Raises The Curtain With 10 Must-See Films

The 2015 Tribeca Film Festival, which runs through April 26, kicked off with its opening night presentation at the Beacon Theater of Live From New York!, Bao Nguyen's documentary on Saturday Night Live, that venerable 40-year old comedy institution. The...

TIFF Kids Talk Film: SHAUN THE SHEEP

TwitchFilm's tiniest film reviewers continue their coverage of TIFF Kids Film Festival, currently happening at Toronto's Lightbox Cinema. Willem (age 12) and Miranda (age 10) delight in the slapstick sheep spectacle spinoff Shaun The Sheep, from the masters of claymation at...

TIFF Kids Talk Film: MAYA THE BEE

TwitchFilm's tiniest film reviewers will be doing tiny reviews for the TIFF Kids Film Festival currently happening at Toronto's Lightbox Cinema from April 7-19. Willem (age 12) and Miranda (age 10) kick off these video micro-reviews with the German/Australian animated 3D...