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Review: THE PRISON Shackles Itself in Familiar Story

The run of corruption thrillers that have proven so popular at the Korean box office of late shows no signs of abating with The Prison, which takes the same themes that have populated works such as Inside Men and Veteran,...

Boston Underground 2017 Review: HIDDEN RESERVES, Dystopian Noir of Money and Death

Insurance is one of the great oddities of the current economy. Pay money every month *in case* something happens. House and medical insurance might be there for you (provided your insurance company doesn't find a loophole to get out of...

Boston Underground 2017 Review: BITCH, A Hilarious and Vicious Bite at the Patriarchy

I doubt you would ever meet a woman who couldn't tell you about how, on a near daily basis, she must endure being dismissed, ignored or mistrusted by men. According to many, we are oversensitive, we exaggerate, we just 'need...

Boston Underground 2017 Review: FRAUD, A Twisted Look at Capitalism and the Public Image

What exactly do we mean when we say a film is a documentary? Do you mean a strict definition, in that a film is depicting or investing something that happened in reality? Or does it mean showing us things from...

Review: I, OLGA HEPNAROVA, A Study in the Absence of Empathy

At one point over the course of this haunting and difficult film, the lead character is reading the Graham Greene novel, The Quiet American. She highlights a passage from the novel that is the lynchpin to understanding the unanswerable questions left...

Review: METAMORPHOSES, Christophe Honoré's Dirtiest, Edgiest, Most Beautiful Film to Date

Metamorphoses works as a dreamy poetry. It's an ode to youth and an abashed celebration of amorphous nature of human sexuality.

Review: CANOA: A SHAMEFUL MEMORY, Who are the Bad Hombres?

It's always a nice surprise to come upon a completely unfamiliar film that is, in fact, a seminal entry in its national cinema history. It's all the more surprising, upon first viewing, to find oneself a bit stunned by that...

Review: It's Oh So Quiet in Kore-eda Hirokazu's AFTER THE STORM

In Kore-eda's world, the storm is not a cause of destruction and pain but a helping agent to bond with each other- something the current Japanese society has lost due to modern life taking its course. But the film is so old-fashioned and soft-edged, it hardly registers on an emotional level. Still a great little film. But after the greatness that was Our Little Sister, After the Storm feels like a minor Kore-eda.

Review: ATOMICA, Strong on Thriller, Light on Sci-Fi

Science fiction stories, especially in film and television, can often set up a sci-fi scenario only to put it almost entirely to the side (making a case for why such a scenario would be used at all). Atomica, directed by...

Review: François Ozon's FRANTZ, Sumptuous, Subversive, Touching and Relevant

The year is 1918. The Great War has just ended and Germany and France were licking their wounds, hopped up on their respective nationalistic fervor. Anna (Paula Beer), a young German woman who lost her 23-year old fiancé, Frantz in...

Now on Blu-ray: THE MAN FROM HONG KONG, LONG WEEKEND, BODY MELT, and THE PUNISHER from Umbrella Entertainment Australia

There is plenty of digital ink spilled on this site and many others about the wonderful work of US and UK cult home video specialists like Severin Films, Arrow Video, Vinegar Syndrome and many others like them. But, there are...

Review: BRIMSTONE, One of the Most Brutal Westerns in Recent Memory

In Brimstone, a Western that’s the English-language debut of Dutch director Martin Koolhoven, young actress Dakota Fanning amazes with her best performance yet, giving life to a character that since the first chapter (the film is divided in four) is...

SXSW 2017 Review: T2 TRAINSPOTTING, The Boys Are Back in Town and It's Not a Pretty Sight

Kicking heroin and staying off it for 20 years is only the first step for Renton. Facing the likely elimination of his office job, Renton (Ewan McGregor) returns to Edinburgh, Scotland in search of something he cannot yet identify. Lost...

SXSW 2017 Review: BABY DRIVER, Grand Entertainment on a Funny, Thrilling Ride

Voom voom voom! So begins Edgar Wright's Baby Driver, which finds Ansel Elgort behind the wheel as a getaway driver, rocking out to the a song blasting from the buds planted in his ears. In the privacy of his own...

SXSW 2017 Review: DIVINE DIVAS Goes Behind the Curtains

Vibrant and enlightening, Divine Divas peeks behind the curtains of the Rival Theatre in Brazil, which was one of the first in the country to showcase men dressed as women in the 1960s. Eight artists have gathered for a 50th...

SXSW 2017 Review: BAD LUCKY GOAT, Two Siblings on a Comic Dramatic Journey

A brother, a sister, a goat. A relaxed charmer, Bad Lucky Goat is some kind of wonderful. It starts with an appetizer that establishes its milieu, a ramshackle island community in the Caribbean. The area is in Colombia, South America,...

Review: THIS BEAUTIFUL FANTASTIC, Charming Light Fare

Every country/culture seems to have its particular version of the 'quirky' person or oddball, especially women, that are seen in film (America has long been obsessed with the so-called Manic Pixie Dream Girl). From the UK, such a woman usually...

Review: PERSONAL SHOPPER, Kristen Stewart, Restless Spirits and Luxury Goods

French critic-turned-filmmaker Olivier Assayas has always had a knack for combining verité, day-to-day life with stylish genre elements. His previous film, The Clouds of Sils Maria, coaxed a assured performance out of Kristen Stewart as a confident personal assistant to a...

Review: RAW, Coming of Age With Visceral Power

It's hard to maintain one's identity when university begins; or perhaps more to the point, find your identity under enormous pressure to do well in school, adapt to life without constant parental supervision, not to mentions the pressures of the...

Review: KONG: SKULL ISLAND, A Lifeless Creature Feature

Director Jordan Vogt-Roberts does not believe in subtlety, does not relish the glorious curious reveal of a brand new creature; an iconic symbol of the movies that hundreds of man-hours were spent to animate and bring to life. This is...