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Review: THE RED TURTLE, Gorgeous and Seriously Emotional

Human emotions can be fragile, unpredictable things. However, they can sometimes also be pretty damned predictable. Show someone a kitten and they'll feel an emotional pang. Show a human going through the stages of life from youth to life's logical...

Review: XXX: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE Is Legitimately Expendable

Vin Diesel resurrects extreme sports secret agent Xander Cage for this belated third entry in the xXx franchise, 12 years after Ice Cube last carried the torch for counter-culture covert operatives. Boasting a large international ensemble and a globe-trotting espionage...

Review: RAILROAD TIGERS, Jackie Chan vs. Japanese Invaders

Jackie Chan last found success in Hollywood by mentoring young Jaden Smith in a remake of the surprisingly decent The Karate Kid. That was more than six years ago. Since then, Chan has rarely been seen in North American theaters....

Review: DANGAL, A Familiar Tale, Told With Bollywood Flair

I've been interrogated about my love-stroke-obsession with Indian cinema ever since I began writing about it on these pages a little over six years ago. I'm not Indian, before this summer I had never been to India, and I didn't...

Review: PANDORA Melds Melodrama and Fukushima Fears

Though not a new phenomenon in Korean cinema, the disaster drama has been particularly popular in 2016 and just as we wind down the year the local industry is preparing to launch one final assault on multiplexes with the release...

Review: SILENCE Demands Respect and Inspires Debate

An impressively devout expression of religious faith that seeks to answer some of mankind's most pressing questions, Silence demands respect and inspires debate, all while displaying the absolute command of master filmmaker Martin Scorsese. Now 74, Scorsese has reportedly desired...

Macau 2016 Review: THE MOLE SONG: HONG KONG CAPRICCIO Sees Miike Find His Sweet Spot

Bursting with anarchic energy and awash with lurid colours, The Mole Song: Hong Kong Capriccio surpasses its 2013 predecessor in sheer entertainment value as a consistently ridiculous crime caper.    Prolific Japanese director Takashi Miike again takes the helm, with...

South Asian 2016 Review: MAROON, A Tale of a Man Trapped With His Worst Fears

In Maroon, veteran character actor Manav Kaul plays an associate college professor whose wife goes missing, and it's not too long before his sanity goes along with her. Manav Kaul plays Saurabh, an associate professor of literature at a liberal...

Blu-ray Review: LONE WOLF AND CUB, Feel-Good Family Films For All

If I have another son, I'm going to name him Daigoro. In 1972, producer Katsu Shintaro (Zatoichi, Hanzo the Razor), director Misumi Kenji (also a veteran of the Zatoichi and Hanzo series), manga artist Koike Kazuo, and lead actor Wakayama...

Review: SWORD MASTER Honours Wuxia Tradition Through Bold Reinvention

Nearly 40 years after Chor Yuen launched his acting career in the Shaw Brothers classic Death Duel, director Derek Yee returns to Gu Long’s source novel for a ravishing new adaptation. With Tsui Hark producing and action choreography from Yuen...

Review: OLD STONE, A Riveting Thriller Where A Good Man Goes Bad

Old Stone develops into a riveting thriller and asks weighty questions about the cost of doing right in an unempathetic society where people rather kill the accident victims off by running over them again rather than saving them. It's a raw and tough first film. And it signals a emergence of a major storyteller.

London Korean 2016 Review: DONGJU, THE PORTRAIT OF A POET Offers Sober and Compelling Look at Modern Korean History

During the last year, the floodgates have opened for the Japanese Occupation Period in mainstream Korean cinema, yet The King and the Clown (2005) helmer Lee Joon-ik, arguably Korea's top purveyor of commercial period fare, has opted to tackle the...

Black Nights 2016 Review: HOUSE OF OTHERS, The Ghosts of War

Sometimes ghosts are visible, sometimes invisible, and sometimes 'ghosts' are the emptiness, the palpable void left behind. And the latter can be the most frightening and sad of all. In Russudan Gluridze's feature film House of Others, the ghosts are...

Review: SKY ON FIRE Goes Down in Flames

Last year saw Ringo Lam, the acclaimed Hong Kong director behind such action spectaculars as City on Fire and Full Contact, stage a comeback with his first feature film in more than a decade. Wild City was a rather modest...

Black Nights 2016 Review: ANATOMY OF VIOLENCE, The Pain of a Terrible Crime

In 2012, a young medical student, Jyoti Singh, was gang-raped and brutally beaten by six men on a bus in New Delhi, later dying of her injuries. This sparked a nation-wide protest, with thousands calling on the government, and Indian...

London Korean 2016 Review: OUR LOVE STORY Offers Authentic, Modern and Compelling Romance

2016 has seen Korean cinema make a big push to focus its narratives on characters from all walks of life, and particularly of different sexual orientations, with several major queer films bowing at festivals from Berlin to Busan. In between...

Blu-ray Review: Jump Straight Into Akira Kurosawa's DREAMS

Akira Kurosawa's DREAMS arrives on Blu-ray from The Criterion Collection, and it's dreamy.

Review: YOUR NAME, a Body-Swap Animated Romance with Brains and Heart

Body swapping, time displacement and comets of mass destruction all feature prominently in Makoto Shinkai’s heart-wrenching adolescent romance. Boasting an infectious soundtrack by RADWINGS and luminous animation, Your Name proves a winning combination of laughter, tears and occasionally mind-bending concepts...

Review: CRD, An Ethereal Exercise In Art Vs. Artifice

CRD is one hell of a feature from director Kranti Kanade. The film utilizes more film techniques in its 100 minutes than most directors do in an entire career.

Review: I AM NOT MADAME BOVARY, Feng Xiaogang's Acerbic Civil Service Satire

As its title proclaims, Feng Xiaogang’s bureaucratic satire I Am Not Madame Bovary has no direct connection to Flaubert’s adulterous heroine. Madame Bovary does, however, share some common traits with Pan Jinlian, the fictional 17th century character from Chinese literature...