International: Asia Reviews

Sort By
From The
Editors
Everything From
Everyone
Most
Loved
Most
Hated
What The
Hell?!

Cannes 2017 Review: THE DAY AFTER Offers Bitter Portrait of Infidelity

Returning to black and white for the first time since The Day He Arrives (which screened in Un Certain Regard in 2011), Hong Sangsoo returns to the Cannes competition section with The Day After, a focused rumination on love and...

Cannes 2017 Review: THE VILLAINESS Shoots and Chops Her Way to Bloody Revenge

Korean action cinema bursts through to new horizons in the hyperkinetic pulp blade and bullet ballet The Villainess. Equal parts Kill Bill, Nikita, John Wick, Hardcore Henry and HK-era John Woo, the second film from Confession of Murder director Jung...

Cannes 2017 Review: CLAIRE'S CAMERA, Hong Sangsoo's Low-Key Cannes Holiday

Love him or hate him, Hong Sangsoo has been remarkably consistent with his films, which both offer viewers a familiar framework and new variations on his favorite themes. His 20th work Claire's Camera debuts this weekend as a Special Screening...

Hot Docs Review 2017: RAMEN HEADS, Slurp-tastic Food Porn

What is it about ramen, Japan's robust working man's (be it salaryman, artist or labourer) meal of broth, noodles and pork, that makes its practitioners and enthusiasts become philosophers and seriocomic poets? Cinema has only encouraged this, as Itami Jûzô's gonzo, fussy,...

Overlook 2017 Review: THE DWARVES MUST BE CRAZY, a Stinker in More Ways than One

The first edition of the Overlook Film Festival will never be faulted for not swinging for the fences with a lineup that includes something for all possible tastes; even if that taste happens to run all the way to the...

NY Indian Film Fest 2017 Review: SIDE A SIDE B, A Love Affair Caught On Tape

It takes huge balls to make a film like Side A Side B. Frankly, I'm surprised that writer/director Sudhish Kamath can sit comfortably with what he must be packing between his legs in order to have conceived this little adventure...

Review: SS Rajamouli's BAAHUBALI 2: THE CONCLUSION Shows A Director on the Verge of International Stardom

Indian director SS Rajamouli is ready for his close-up. For years filmmakers in India have toiled in international obscurity, only occasionally emerging from the shadows when something strikes a chord with international - largely arthouse - audiences. The stereotype of...

Imagine 2017 Review: GUARDIANS

(As the editor-in-chief of Preview Magazine exclaimed when introducing this screening: "Criticize it all you like, but it has a bear with a minigun!") If you've seen its trailers (and why shouldn't you have), you know exactly what to expect...

Indian Film Fest LA 2017 Review: THE CINEMA TRAVELLERS, Captures a Moment of Transition and Rebirth

Shirley Abraham and Amit Madheshiya's The Cinema Travellers is a love letter to an age quickly coming to a close in India and around the world. Once upon a time in India, the only way that the small remote villages...

Indian Film Fest LA 2017 Review: TRAPPED, Loneliness Abounds in the Midst of Millions

Vikram Motwane's Trapped is the story of a man who becomes locked in his flat hundreds of feet above the bustling metropolis of Mumbai with no one to save him or even miss him. When the story first became apparent...

Review: YOUR NAME, A Wondrous Delight From Start to Finish

Body swapping, time displacement and comets of mass destruction all feature prominently in Makoto Shinkai’s heart-wrenching adolescent romance. Boasting an infectious soundtrack by RADWIMPS and luminous animation, Your Name proves a winning combination of laughter, tears and occasionally mind-bending concepts...

Review: THE PRISON Shackles Itself in Familiar Story

The run of corruption thrillers that have proven so popular at the Korean box office of late shows no signs of abating with The Prison, which takes the same themes that have populated works such as Inside Men and Veteran,...

Review: It's Oh So Quiet in Kore-eda Hirokazu's AFTER THE STORM

In Kore-eda's world, the storm is not a cause of destruction and pain but a helping agent to bond with each other- something the current Japanese society has lost due to modern life taking its course. But the film is so old-fashioned and soft-edged, it hardly registers on an emotional level. Still a great little film. But after the greatness that was Our Little Sister, After the Storm feels like a minor Kore-eda.

Review: HEADSHOT, Iko Uwais in a World of Fast Action and Brutal Violence

Off the coast of Indonesia, the body of man washes up on shore near a small village. As he lies comatose in a hospital a doctor from Jakarta, Ailin, looks after him. When he regains consciousness only fragments of his...

Review: A SINGLE RIDER Subtly Ponders the Small Regrets of Life

A few months after the explosive period spy thriller The Age of Shadows from genre maestro Kim Jee-woon, Warner Bros is back with its second Korean production, A Single Rider. Though both films share star Lee Byung-hun, who appears as...

Review: FABRICATED CITY, Mediocrity Hidden Behind Big-Budget Thrills

Twelve years after the success of Korean War comedy-drama Welcome to Dongmakgol, director Park Kwang-hyun is finally back in theaters with the action-thriller Fabricated City. A tale of gamers and conspiracies in modern Seoul, Park's latest presents itself as a...

Berlinale 2017 Review: Liu Jian Triumphs With HAVE A NICE DAY

Animated movies for adults are painfully undervalued, both at a festival level and as an art form, but Liu Jian's Have A Nice Day is a title that could smash through those barriers. Certainly one of the more interesting features...

Berlinale 2017 Review: ON THE BEACH AT NIGHT ALONE, Hong Sang-soo's Most Personal and Cruel Film to Date

A new year has arrived and with it the challenge of reviewing a new work from Korea's arthouse darling Hong Sang-soo. On the Beach at Night Alone, which borrows its name from the title of a Walt Whitman poem and...

Review: In Zhang Yimou's THE GREAT WALL, Matt Damon Saves the World

I've seen sillier attempts at blockbuster fantasy films than Zhang Yimou's latest, The Great Wall, but I must admit it's been a while. The director, one of China's most respected visual artists after his stunning work on crossover hit wu...

Rotterdam 2017 Review: BAMSEOM PIRATES SEOUL INFERNO Challenges Our Sense Of Liberty

Documentaries tend to do well at the International Film Festival Rotterdam, and each year several manage to get into the audience top-10. The 2017 edition has proven to be no exception, as there are three documentaries in the top-5 alone....