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Review: A SINGLE RIDER Subtly Ponders the Small Regrets of Life

A few months after the explosive period spy thriller The Age of Shadows from genre maestro Kim Jee-woon, Warner Bros is back with its second Korean production, A Single Rider. Though both films share star Lee Byung-hun, who appears as...

Review: FABRICATED CITY, Mediocrity Hidden Behind Big-Budget Thrills

Twelve years after the success of Korean War comedy-drama Welcome to Dongmakgol, director Park Kwang-hyun is finally back in theaters with the action-thriller Fabricated City. A tale of gamers and conspiracies in modern Seoul, Park's latest presents itself as a...

Berlinale 2017 Review: Liu Jian Triumphs With HAVE A NICE DAY

Animated movies for adults are painfully undervalued, both at a festival level and as an art form, but Liu Jian's Have A Nice Day is a title that could smash through those barriers. Certainly one of the more interesting features...

Berlinale 2017 Review: ON THE BEACH AT NIGHT ALONE, Hong Sang-soo's Most Personal and Cruel Film to Date

A new year has arrived and with it the challenge of reviewing a new work from Korea's arthouse darling Hong Sang-soo. On the Beach at Night Alone, which borrows its name from the title of a Walt Whitman poem and...

Review: In Zhang Yimou's THE GREAT WALL, Matt Damon Saves the World

I've seen sillier attempts at blockbuster fantasy films than Zhang Yimou's latest, The Great Wall, but I must admit it's been a while. The director, one of China's most respected visual artists after his stunning work on crossover hit wu...

Rotterdam 2017 Review: BAMSEOM PIRATES SEOUL INFERNO Challenges Our Sense Of Liberty

Documentaries tend to do well at the International Film Festival Rotterdam, and each year several manage to get into the audience top-10. The 2017 edition has proven to be no exception, as there are three documentaries in the top-5 alone....

Review: In Shanker Raman's GURGAON, Blood Makes The Grass Grow

Family can be a tricky thing. The bonds forged between blood relations are often tenuous and fraught with jealousy and distrust. You can't choose the people with whom you make those bonds, and as a result, those people aren't always...

Review: SAIGON BODYGUARDS Doesn't Phuc With The Bromance

Professional bodyguards Viên and Trịnh's latest assignment -- protecting Henry, a rich brat who becomes heir to the LeMilk company after his father's death -- will make them sweat: the funeral is not even finished before Henry is kidnapped by...

Review: CONFIDENTIAL ASSIGNMENT, A Routine Action-Comedy for the Whole Family

After taking a back seat to Joseon Era dramas and then Japanese Colonial Era films over the last few years, tales of North Korean spies are ramping up to make a big comeback on screens in 2017. The first of...

Now on Blu-ray: SUDDENLY IN THE DARK and NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND DESIRES From Mondo Macabro

Mondo Macabro has done it again with another killer pair of Blu-ray releases for films you didn't even know you couldn't live without. This time around the company tackles a duo of sexy horror films from opposite ends of the...

Rotterdam 2017 Review: SEXY DURGA, One Terrifying Night In Darkest India

Man is a dangerous beast. Long ago, before the time of cinema, before the time of television, and certainly before the time of the Internet, the Indian subcontinent was a land mostly known as a fruitful place for the nightmares...

Review: THE KING, Korea's Very Own Scorsese Crime Saga

Coming in the midst of an unprecedented political scandal and benefitting from a prime Lunar New Year holiday release date, prosecutor drama The King aims to be the first Korean hit of the year. A glossily entertaining saga with big...

Review: THE SALESMAN, Asghar Farhadi's Riveting Tale of Revenge and Shame

Farhadi has a real knack for portraying guilt of ordinary people. The degree of guilt he is showing might be a little too dramatic to pass as a real life. But that degree is small enough to make us uncomfortable. Deeply philosophical with human entanglements, culture, tradition, class and morality, The Salesman is a complex drama with a great narrative pull that is a richly rewarding experience.

Review: RAEES, Shah Rukh Khan Steps Into The Wayback Machine But Can't Help Being Himself

When it comes to Bollywood superstar Shah Rukh Khan, I am a man of perpetual hope and enthusiasm. Over the last twenty-five years SRK has delivered some iconic performances in films by some of Bollywood's biggest directors, and every time...

Review: In KUNG FU YOGA, Jackie Chan Heads to India on an Adventure

Once it gets rolling, the exceedingly silly Kung Fu Yoga made me very happy. Jackie Chan stars as an archaeology professor, and if that puts you in mind of Chan's role as a globe-trotting treasure hunter in Armor of God...

Slamdance 2017 Review: KURO Spins a Spellbinding, Exquisitely Photographed Tale

Don’t you wonder sometimes ’Bout sound and vision … – David Bowie, “Sound and Vision” When you’ve seen a countless number of films over your lifetime, the effect can be somewhat numbing, especially after viewing many examples of standard variations...

Slamdance 2017 Review: AEROTROPOLIS, An Elegantly Made Portrait of (Sub)Urban Alienation

Li Jheng-neng's debut feature is an elegant, microbudget vision of urban/suburban anomie, which has qualities that will be familiar to intrepid art filmgoers, especially those conversant with the films of Li's fellow Taiwanese countryman Tsai Ming-liang.

Review: THE RED TURTLE, Gorgeous and Seriously Emotional

Human emotions can be fragile, unpredictable things. However, they can sometimes also be pretty damned predictable. Show someone a kitten and they'll feel an emotional pang. Show a human going through the stages of life from youth to life's logical...

Review: XXX: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE Is Legitimately Expendable

Vin Diesel resurrects extreme sports secret agent Xander Cage for this belated third entry in the xXx franchise, 12 years after Ice Cube last carried the torch for counter-culture covert operatives. Boasting a large international ensemble and a globe-trotting espionage...

Review: RAILROAD TIGERS, Jackie Chan vs. Japanese Invaders

Jackie Chan last found success in Hollywood by mentoring young Jaden Smith in a remake of the surprisingly decent The Karate Kid. That was more than six years ago. Since then, Chan has rarely been seen in North American theaters....