Festivals: Sitges Reviews

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Sitges 2015 Review: FROM THE DARK Is An Enjoyable, If Repetitive, Ride

Conor McMahon is no stranger here in Sitges. The Irish director already succeeded in winning the audience's affection back in 2012 with Stitches, a film that managed to get as much laughter as jumps and scares. This time he comes back to Sitges with...

Sitges 2014 Review: MONSTERS: DARK CONTINENT, An Intense Yet Alienating Ordeal

Four years after Gareth Edwards exploded onto the sci-fi scene with his inventive and industrious indie alien invasion flick Monsters, first-time director Tom Green delivers a sequel that bears little resemblance to the original, in tone, content or invention.Reportedly set...

Sitges 2014 Review: MAGICAL GIRL, Dark, Twisted Magic

Carlos Vermut's second feature Magical Girl recently won the Golden Shell at the a Sebastian Film Festival, as well as best director award, and deservedly so. Fun and disturbing, strange and yet somehow entirely plausible, the film tells the story of...

Sitges 2013 Review: PEOPLE IN PLACES Is An Experimental Charmer

Gente en sitios (People In Places) is the latest movie from Spanish director Juan Cavestany. Cavestany has an extensive background in both cinema and theatre as director and writer, but remains mostly unknown to the general public even in his...

Sitges 2013 Review: MINDSCAPE Is An Intriguing Twist On The Classic Thriller

Sigmund Freud described the human mind as a series of rooms. In each one, our psychological traumas and memories are hidden, and our subconscious keeps many of them locked. These strange rooms of the mind and their secrets are explored...

Sitges 2013 Review: AMERICAN JESUS, An Outside Look At The Fringe Faces Of Christianity

When an American tells you that they're a Christian, you might need to ask them what denomination, and the answer you get might not be one of the more common ones. In his second feature documentary, Spanish directer Aram Garriga...

Sitges 2012 Review: THE SECOND DEATH Finds New Terror in Religion

Argentinean director Santiago Fernández Calvete's The Second Death is an oddity: A hard-boiled, supernatural mystery that revolves heavily around Catholic dogma. Its engagement with religion is far more complex than the slew of exorcism movies we've been subjected to as...

Sitges 2012 Counterpoint Review: THE LORDS OF SALEM Turns a Satanic Cult into a Snoozefest

Goofy. That's the word that kept popping into my head through the entire running time of Rob Zombie's baffling Polanski rip-off, The Lords of Salem. Not weird, not bizarre, not hallucinogenic, and certainly not Lynchian, as some critics (including our...

Sitges 2012 Review: BLOOD-C THE LAST DARK Brings Mixed Closure To The Franchise

The Blood-C saga is the latest entry in the long running Blood: The Last Vampire franchise, which has spanned different media such as novels, manga, TV series and films. Produced in collaboration by Production I.G and famous manga creators CLAMP,...

Bradford 2012 review: THE INNKEEPERS

Why do so many characters in horror movies end up dooming themselves through their stubborn refusal to take what's going on at face value? To be fair, we all say we'd do things differently but it's a hard thing to...

LIFF 2011: THE DIVIDE review

Xavier Gens' superb The Divide basically posits that should the bombs drop and the world get blown to radioactive splinters, the scariest thing that could happen wouldn't be finding out you were screwed. It'd be finding out that given the...

LIFF 2011: JUAN OF THE DEAD review

At first glance Alejandro Brugués's zombie comedy Juan of the Dead doesn't sound too promising. Unless you're a devoted follower of the diverse strands of Latin American cinema the idea of an unknown director shooting an affectionate tribute to Edgar...

LIFF 2011: EXIT HUMANITY review

There are some ideas it's hard to see how people could possibly screw up. Take horror (as in the supernatural) in the middle of a war zone. You've got potentially limitless subtext, the nightmares soldiers and civilians go through literally...

LIFF 2011: BELLFLOWER review

It's great when a director identifies with a film they've poured heart and soul into making, even more so when it's clearly pushed them to excel. Still, what are you supposed to think when it's a story about weak, contemptible...

Sitges 2011: BEAST Review

Love can make anyone behave strangely. The chemicals that flood the brain when love arrives turn all our emotions into extremes: we want the one we love to the point of obsession. But some tip over that point into madness,...

Sitges 2011: EL CALLEJON (BLIND ALLEY) Review

You never know quite what path Antonio Trashorras is going to take you on. He first gained  international attention in 2001 with his screenplay of The Devil's Backbone, a haunting ghost story set in the Spanish Civil War; last year...

Sitges 2011: CHICKEN WITH PLUMS Review

Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud's adaptation of Satrapi's graphic novel Chicken with Plums is a delicious fantasy, one that will leave your heart warm and likely more than a little sad. Presented with a combination of live action and animation,...

Sitges 2011: HELLACIOUS ACRES: THE CASE OF JOHN GLASS Review

Have you ever had one of those days where you wake up in a strange spacesuit, being told by an automated message that the world has ended several hundred years before due to war and alien invasion, and you must...

Sitges 2011: A LETTER TO MOMO Review

You can't say that Hiroyuki Okiura is a prolific director. It's been more than ten years since his directorial debut with Jin-Roh and despite that film's tremendous success it's not until now that his second film sees the light. When...

Sitges 2011: THE YELLOW SEA Review

Korean director Na Hong-jin returns to Sitges to present his latest film, The Yellow Sea. It's been a while since his previous directorial effort The Chaser, which gathered quite an international success. And with such credentials, the expectations for his...