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Tribeca 2017 Review: THE ENDLESS, Monster with a Movie Camera

Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead's work has always been (at least in part) about intimacy and trust; particularly the intimacy of close relationships, and how problems manifest; and in the case of their films, they often manifest in the form...

Tribeca 2017 Review: THE PUBLIC IMAGE IS ROTTEN, A Legendary Musician's Musical and Personal Reinvention

“Ever get the feeling you’ve been cheated?” John Lydon aka Johnny Rotten’s acerbic question to the audience at the end of the Sex Pistols’ disastrous 1978 U.S. tour may have marked the end of that group, but for Lydon himself,...

Imagine 2017 Review: MOLLY Wins You Over With Perseverance And Ingenuity

Dutch science fiction films are few and far between, so when the Imagine Film Festival announced the world premiere of Molly, I was intrigued to say the least. And indeed, Colinda Bongers and Thijs Meuwese have managed to create a...

Imagine 2017 Review: GUARDIANS

(As the editor-in-chief of Preview Magazine exclaimed when introducing this screening: "Criticize it all you like, but it has a bear with a minigun!") If you've seen its trailers (and why shouldn't you have), you know exactly what to expect...

Indian Film Fest LA 2017 Review: THE CINEMA TRAVELLERS, Captures a Moment of Transition and Rebirth

Shirley Abraham and Amit Madheshiya's The Cinema Travellers is a love letter to an age quickly coming to a close in India and around the world. Once upon a time in India, the only way that the small remote villages...

Indian Film Fest LA 2017 Review: TRAPPED, Loneliness Abounds in the Midst of Millions

Vikram Motwane's Trapped is the story of a man who becomes locked in his flat hundreds of feet above the bustling metropolis of Mumbai with no one to save him or even miss him. When the story first became apparent...

Brussels 2017 Review: STRANGLED, Events in This Hungarian Thriller Will Linger Long After

The small town of Martfü, Hungary, became well known after the war for its shoe factory. But after the revolution in 1956, an atrocious murder of a local woman from a factory scares local authorities into action.   A psychotic...

Osaka 2017 Review: BAMI Offers an Inventive New Take on J-Horror

Director Tanaka Jun’s debut feature Bamy tackles J-horror in a similar vein to Kurosawa Kiyoshi, concerning itself as much with the relationships between the living inhabitants of the film as it does with their connection to the dead. A couple...

Boston Underground 2017 Review: BITCH, A Hilarious and Vicious Bite at the Patriarchy

I doubt you would ever meet a woman who couldn't tell you about how, on a near daily basis, she must endure being dismissed, ignored or mistrusted by men. According to many, we are oversensitive, we exaggerate, we just 'need...

Boston Underground 2017 Review: FRAUD, A Twisted Look at Capitalism and the Public Image

What exactly do we mean when we say a film is a documentary? Do you mean a strict definition, in that a film is depicting or investing something that happened in reality? Or does it mean showing us things from...

SXSW 2017 Review: TRAGEDY GIRLS, Their Teenage Egos Have A Body Count

The horror genre is one of the most forgiving there is. Fanatics regularly overlook low-budgets, no-name actors, questionable performances, and mediocre writing if a film delivers the kind of thrills that turn them on. The horror-comedy, however, is a far...

SXSW 2017 Review: From SMALL CRIMES Come Big Troubles

Four years ago, Evan Katz made his directorial debut with the pitch-black comedy thriller Cheap Thrills, pitting Pat Healy against Ethan Embry in a diabolical, desperate game of survival. Now Katz has returned to the director's chair with Small Crimes,...

SXSW 2017 Review: In 68 KILL, A Bunch of Assholes Hurtle Toward Oblivion

Matthew Gray Gubler's Chip has a really hard time with women in Trent Haaga's scumbags-on-parade exploitationer, 68 Kill. The story revolves around a white trash heist of $68,000 initiated by Chip's emasculating maniacal girlfriend, Liza (AnnaLynne McCord), who uses her...

SXSW 2017 Review: Three Dystopian Narcissists and an INFINITY BABY

In the not too distant future of Infinity Baby, stem cell research has caused a freak side effect wherein a certain breed of newborns will not age, rather they'll stay babies for their entire lives. Society has deemed them "infinity...

SXSW 2017 Review: DAVID LYNCH - THE ART LIFE Sheds Light on Darkness

David Lynch is one of the great mysteries in the filmmaking world. His films are meticulously constructed enigmas, which require the same type of open minded approach to understanding as it likely takes Lynch himself to paint with images. His...

SXSW 2017 Review: MAYHEM, So Fast on Its Feet That It's Almost Out of Control

With great lead performances by Steven Yeun and Samara Weaving, a great musical score by Steve Moore, and great bloody action masterminded by director Joe Lynch, Mayhem is almost too much fun. It's the perfect example of a movie that...

SXSW 2017 Dispatch: A Solid Year of Docs Continues + More Films and Fun from Austin

It's been an excellent year for documentaries already in 2017 with such incredible films as Icarus, An Inconvenient Sequel, Nobody Speak, and Trophy all premiering at Sundance (those last two playing SXSW as well). There have been several new great...

SXSW 2017 Review: HOUNDS OF LOVE, a Beast with a Ferocious Bite

Serial killer thrillers that deal with the dark subject matter of abuse and sexual victimization are the cinematic equivalent of playing with fire. Especially if your film is based loosely on real life crimes, as is the case with Hounds...

SXSW 2017 Dispatch: THE LIGHT OF THE MOON and M.F.A., Or, How to Deal with Rape

Male filmmakers have been exploiting the violent rape of women on screen for decades. How do female filmmakers deal with the subject? The Light of the Moon, written and directed by Jessica M. Thompson, and M.F.A., written by Leah McKendrick...

SXSW 2017 Review: Triumph of THE DISASTER ARTIST

I think we were all pretty skeptical upon hearing the announcement that James Franco would be bringing the story of the making of Tommy Wiseau's The Room to the big screen over three years ago; at least those of us...