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Cannes 2017 Review: THE MEYEROWITZ STORIES (NEW AND SELECTED), Rich on Dysfunctional Delight

While Cannes has not exactly been light on controversy this year, one film in its lineup was easily singled out as a suspicious inclusion when the official selection was first announced. After all, not only does The Meyerowitz Stories (New...

Cannes 2017 Review: THE MERCILESS Punches Up Familiar Gangster Tale

After helming a low-key music drama (The Beat Goes On) and a romantic comedy (Whatcha Wearin'?), director Byun Sung-hyun finally shows off what may be his true colors in the brash and confident half gangster thriller, half prison drama The...

Cannes 2017 Review: THE BEGUILED, A Campy Anatomy of Lust

Sofia Coppola is a filmmaker whose work I've appreciated from a distance. I know she's a great director, but apart from Marie Antoinette, her stories of rich white people and their troubles has held little interest for me. But as...

Cannes 2017 Dispatch: A Strong Year for the Sidebars

The main attraction at what might be the world's most bifurcated film festival is certainly the Palme d'Or competition. But there is always a film or two that finds a fair amount of buzz out of one of the primary...

Cannes 2017 Review: THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER, Love Can Make Us Cruel

Human beings can be kind, generous, and loving. But they can also be self-indulgent, vicious, and cruel. We all want to believe that, under certain circumstances, we would sacrifice and fight for the lives of our loved ones. But would...

Cannes 2017 Review: THE DAY AFTER Offers Bitter Portrait of Infidelity

Returning to black and white for the first time since The Day He Arrives (which screened in Un Certain Regard in 2011), Hong Sangsoo returns to the Cannes competition section with The Day After, a focused rumination on love and...

Cannes 2017 Review: FACES PLACES, A Delightful and Poignant Capture of Working Life

The Grand Dame of French cinema, Agnès Varda's work has ranged from the New Wave in Cleo from 5 to 7, to feminism and friendship in One Sings, The Other Doesn't, to documenting the life of the poor in The...

Cannes 2017 Review: THE VILLAINESS Shoots and Chops Her Way to Bloody Revenge

Korean action cinema bursts through to new horizons in the hyperkinetic pulp blade and bullet ballet The Villainess. Equal parts Kill Bill, Nikita, John Wick, Hardcore Henry and HK-era John Woo, the second film from Confession of Murder director Jung...

Cannes 2017 Review: CLAIRE'S CAMERA, Hong Sangsoo's Low-Key Cannes Holiday

Love him or hate him, Hong Sangsoo has been remarkably consistent with his films, which both offer viewers a familiar framework and new variations on his favorite themes. His 20th work Claire's Camera debuts this weekend as a Special Screening...

Cannes 2017 Dispatch: Competition Embraces the Weird

For a festival notorious for taking itself way too seriously, the opening salvo of the Palme d'Or competition has been filled with movies that are actually pretty weird. Of course, that's incredibly refreshing. Not to say that it isn't nice...

Cannes 2017 Review: OKJA Will Make You Jump for Joy and Burst into Tears

An endearing family adventure, a bitter ecological plea and a rousing action film all rolled into one, Okja proves once more that Bong Joon Ho is a master of twisting something new out of the familiar. While Netflix's gamble screams...

Hot Docs 2017 Review: 78/52, An Endearing, Insightful Study of a Single Masterstroke of a Cinematic Legend

At the end of the Summer of 1960 audiences and fans of British auteur Alfred Hitchcock and his already stellar filmography scurried into cinemas to watch his new film, Psycho. Riding a growing wave of popularity, hot on the heels...

Hot Docs 2017 Review: BRIMSTONE & GLORY, Where Cinematography Induces Euphoria & Panic

Do you remember that sequence in Beasts Of The Southern Wild when everyone runs around shooting fireworks at each other in the Bayou? The glorious dance of the visuals and music grasp at the essence and the onslaught of life's...

Hot Docs 2017 Review: SHINERS, Making A Living With Polish

Opting for nothing less than an examination of the purpose and philosophy of 21st century labour -- in short, how and why do we work in an era of automation and disposable consumerism? -- Stacey Tenenbaum's re-evaluation of the humble...

Tribeca 2017 Review: THE LOVERS, Break Up To Make Up, That's All They Do

Azazel Jacobs is a young filmmaker who’s continuing a family tradition. His father is avant-garde cinema legend Ken Jacobs, and his mother Flo and sister Nisi are also participants, all of them having worked on each other’s films. (Ken and Flo played the protagonist’s parents in Azazel’s 2008...

Hot Docs Review 2017: RAMEN HEADS, Slurp-tastic Food Porn

What is it about ramen, Japan's robust working man's (be it salaryman, artist or labourer) meal of broth, noodles and pork, that makes its practitioners and enthusiasts become philosophers and seriocomic poets? Cinema has only encouraged this, as Itami Jûzô's gonzo, fussy,...

Hot Docs 2017 Review: HOBBYHORSE REVOLUTION Revels in the Intensity of Youth

Dressage, in equestrian terms, is the art of riding and training a horse in a manner that develops obedience, flexibility, and balance. It factors significantly into Selma Vilhunen's documentary on the most curious of Finland subcultures, one involving hobbyhorses and (mostly)...

Hot Docs 2017 Review: ALL THAT PASSES BY THROUGH A WINDOW THAT DOESN'T OPEN

I have a particular fondness for movies set on trains or in railyards, and also for documentaries about labour. Thus, it should come as no surprise, that Martin DiCicco's All That Passes By Through A Window That Doesn't Open caught...

Hot Docs 2017 Review: PACMEN Is Exquisite Schadenfreude

How many people have selfies taken with Dr. Ben Carson on their phones that they will probably never look at again? For a few shining moments, the former neurosurgeon whose stab-to-scalpel story was adapted into a television movie starring Cuba...

Overlook 2017 First Impression: Mystery Abounds in IT COMES AT NIGHT + Trailer

One of the biggest successes of this weekend's uber-successful inaugural Overlook Film Fest was the surprise closing night film It Comes at Night. Not only is it director Trey Edward Shults's hotly anticipated horror follow-up to the much-loved Krisha, but...