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Berlinale 2018 Review: THE INTERPRETER, Two Oldtimers in a Road Dramedy

Peter Simonischek of Toni Erdmann fame meets Oscar-winning director Jiří Menzel in a dramedy by Slovak director Martin Šulík

Rotterdam 2018 Review: THE DEATH OF STALIN Makes You Laugh At A Corrupt Tragedy

We're big fans of Scottish writer/director Armando Iannucci here at Screen Anarchy, and have been ever since he was doing short comedic skits on the BBC. The man is now of course most famous for his series Veep, The Thick...

Berlinale 2018 Review: MUSEO, Another Gem of Charming Fecklessness By Alonso Ruizpalacios

Having won the Best First Feature Award with his exquisite debut Güeros at the Berlinale in 2014, director Alonso Ruizpalacios now excitingly returns to the festival's Main Competition with Museo (Museum). This sophomore effort feels much larger in scale, and it...

Rotterdam 2018 Review: THE HEART, a Trendy Millennial Drama Celebrating Female Sexuality and Independence

The heart wants what it wants, but does not get – this is the premise of Swedish actress-director Fanni Metelius’s debut The Heart (Hjartat), about a young photographer Mika and her musician boyfriend Tesfay who are madly in love, yet...

Berlinale 2018 Review: UNSANE, A Stellar Piece of Psycho Fiction

Depending on what your thoughts on Logan Lucky were, it was possible to worry that Steven Soderbergh had hit a bit of a bump in the road last year, but fortunately the director of prized titles like Ocean's Eleven, Magic...

Berlinale 2018 Review: FAKE TATTOOS, Bearing the Marks of a Great Teenage Drama

Whilst not Pascal Plante's first feature film, having previously made doc La génération porn in 2014, Fake Tattoos (Les faux tatouages) is the director's first step into feature-length drama. And it's quite the first step - one that definitely carries...

Rotterdam 2018 Review: THE REPORTS ON SARAH AND SALEEM Marries Arthouse Drama to Genre Audience Allure Without Losing Complexity

Muayad Alayan´s sophomore feature The Reports on Sarah and Saleem infuses genre sensibilities into arthouse drama against the backdrop of a political conflict

Berlinale 2018 Review: THE INVISIBLE HANDS, An Unlikely Meeting of Cultures Yields Strange and Beautiful Results

The Invisible Hands, an excellent documentary by Marina Gioti and Georges Salameh, explores the unlikely collaboration between American musical provocateur Alan Bishop and a group of young Egyptian musicians whose lives were upended by the Arab Spring. The film's international...

Berlinale 2018 Review: THE REAL ESTATE, a Devilishly Good Invasion of Personal Space

It's been hard to find something truly worth writing home about since opening night of this year's 68th Berlinale programme, but thankfully Swedish film The Real Estate (Toppen av ingenting) has finally exploded onto the scene. Like a cinematic pipe...

Berlinale 2018 Review: GARBAGE Savagely Attacks Religious Hypocrisy In Media Addicted India

A nation crippled by divisive partisan politics and violent religious and cultural hardliners. A nation in which anyone who doesn't expressly and enthusiastically support the right wing central government is labeled as traitorous and excoriated on twenty four hour partisan...

Berlinale 2018 Review: ISLE OF DOGS, An Obvious Joy By the Masterful Wes Anderson

The 68th Berlinale Film Festival's Main Competition opened in safe hands today, with Wes Anderson's brilliant latest animation Isle of Dogs. Already hotly anticipated by the director's fiercly loyal fans ever since the film's trailer was dropped by Fox Searchlight...

Rotterdam 2018 Review: WESTERN Documents Clashing Cultures

Valeska Grisebach's new film Western takes place, ironically, in Eastern Europe, the narrative following a group of German builders on a construction site deep in the remote woods of Bulgaria. But the title immediately provides its viewers with an interesting...

Rotterdam 2018 Review: MUTAFUKAZ Crackles With Visual Prowess

Last year, French comic-book publisher (slash-gaming-company) Ankama and the Japanese animation legends of Studio 4°C released a joint effort which has to be seen to be believed: the urban action science-fiction satire Mutafukaz. Based on Ankama's edgy comic-book series of...

Sundance 2018 Review: SWEET COUNTRY, a Powerful Slowburn on Australia's Not-So-Sweet History

Warwick Thornton's Sweet Country opens with Sam Neill's preacher Fred Smith sharing a meal with his Aboriginal farmhands Sam and Lizzie Kelly (exceptional newcomers Hamilton Morris and Natassia Gorey-Furber). "We're all equal in the eyes of the Lord," the preacher sermonizes as he...

Sundance 2018 Review: HAL, A Great Director of the 1970s Gets His Due

The so-called “New Hollywood” of the 1970s was driven by a number of filmmakers, many of them film school trained, who broke with many established modes of production and benefited from the opportunities afforded them by the collapse of the...

Sundance 2018 Review: TYREL, An Ambiguous and Uncomfortable Look at Casual Racism

Proving that ostracized characters with odd outlooks on life can be effectively disturbing in any language, Chilean director Sebastián Silva has made a career, in both Spanish and English, out of stories focused on people pushed to the edge –...

Rotterdam 2018 Review: SATAN'S SLAVES Are Coming For You

Horror elements have always played a role in Joko Anwar's thrillers. The Indonesian filmmaker seems to revel in making his audience cringe or jump from time to time, and he has always gladly incorporated supernatural elements to do so. Therefore...

Rotterdam 2018 Review: BLUE MY MIND Is Frank, Feminine and All-around Fantastic

There’s something about first-time filmmakers turning to the coming-of-age genre that feels oddly appropriate. Ostensibly at least, it’s a perfect experiential match between creator and creation insofar as both cineaste and protagonist are debuting into the world after a journey...

Sundance 2018 Review: KUSAMA - INFINITY, Inside the Life, Work, and Mind of a Legendary Artist

Now at the age of 88, legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is currently one of the most popular and successful artists in the world. Her recent New York gallery exhibition, "Yayoi Kusama: Festival of Life" - featuring her signature "Infinity...

Sundance 2018 Review: RUST, An Intriguing, Split-Screen Portrait of Abuse

Aly Muritiba’s Ferrugem (lit. Rust) opens with a haunting shot of a gymnotiform. It rears its head out of the coral, eyes still-white, mouth plopping open and shut, and body coated in a corroded tint of yellow. “They say when...