Berlinale 2018: Watch The Teaser For Brazilian LGBTQ Drama HARD PAINT (TINTA BRUTA)

Contributing Editor; Toronto, Canada (@Mack_SAnarchy)
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Berlinale 2018: Watch The Teaser For Brazilian LGBTQ Drama HARD PAINT (TINTA BRUTA)

Filipe Matzembacher and Marcio Reolon’s LGBTQ drama Hard Paint (Tinta Bruta) from Brazil will have its world premiere in the Panorama programme in Berlin Sunday night, February 18th. Screen Anarchy is pleased to debut the new teaser for the film which you will find below along with a selection of images in a gallery. 

While facing criminal charges, Pedro must grapple with his sister’s sudden decision to move away and leave him behind. Alone in the darkness of his bedroom, he dances covered in neon paint, while thousands of strangers watch him via webcam.

To help give everyone a sense of what the directors are trying to do with their second film here is a excerpt from a press kit that came to us as well. 

Hard Paint is about surviving into this world, finding the strength within yourself to move forward and face the judgment of others. It is much more constructed on the interpersonal relationships, on the conflict of the self and the reception of the other, and especially on a tone of violence that permeates human relations, whether through judgemental eyes or even physical aggressions. 
 
The initial idea came from a feeling of abandonment. We live in a medium sized city. Therefore, a good part of our friends, as soon as they passed adolescence, moved to larger cities in the country or even abroad. For those who remain there like ourselves, what is left are the memories and the feeling of staying in a place abandoned by so many others. And the virtual contact that remains between people seems insufficient to us. Non-materiality and the creation of online personas motivated some aspects of the characters, especially in the duality between Pedro (material world) and NeonBoy (virtual world).
 
Finally, our writing process was affected by a turbulent political and social moment, characterized by the weakening of Brazilian democracy and the growth of conservatism and waves of prejudice in Brazil and around the world. This has fueled us with anger and despair, which are printed on the film. They were guiding feelings while we were writing the script.
 
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